I want to start boxing! Tips?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 01, 2010 4:46 AM GMT
    I recently joined a gym in downtown Chicago, and it has punching bags and for some reason I've always wanted to box. I just don't know how to start out without making a complete fool out of myself!

    Any tips?
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    Nov 01, 2010 12:08 PM GMT
    Get a trainer, if only for a few sessions. They can show you how to wrap your hands, first off (you'd be surprised how profoundly you can fuck up your hands if you don't do this right), footwork, how to approach the bag, change up your regular workouts (for example, adding jumprope) and spar with you in controlled conditions.
  • bad_wolf

    Posts: 1002

    Nov 01, 2010 12:23 PM GMT
    How developed are you triceps, did an entire session of pure punching at tkd once felt it there the most, second in the delts and traps.
  • inuman

    Posts: 733

    Nov 01, 2010 1:00 PM GMT
    Well I taught basic boxing and still do on the rare occasion but I'll tell you a few things to help you along, after all its what we're here for is it not?

    1. Ask the gym if they have a boxing coach or instructor. Kickboxing is a very different thing in a lot of ways, so someone who is teaching kickboxing who hasn't trained in boxing isn't going to know a lot of stances and the limited movement you have when boxing. So yeah that's the main one in regards to the gym you joined.

    2. Boxing has 2 basic types of wraps, depending on your coach they are going to swear by them. Mexican wraps which are more flexible and has a lot more give and Standard wraps. Mainly it comes down to how each one feels to you. I use both depending on how hard I am going to train that day on the bag. Also how your hands are going to be wrapped is also going to be different and again its how it feels to you.

    3. Use this website as I've passed it onto students who which to learn on their own time. It has the basics and is very helpful for such things.

    http://www.balazsboxing.com/cgi-bin/catalog2.cgi?action=page&page=in%20the%20gym|boxing%20basics

    4. Remember that the way you hit the bag has to be proper or you will injure your hands even during warm ups. Also try breathing from your nose when hitting for more then 5 minutes because its the best way to train your body for the longer sessions of bag hitting.

    5. Just cause someone says they know how to teach, doesn't mean they really know how. Ask them to do 3 different combination's on the bag and if they can't do that properly then most likely you won't learn much from them.

    6. Lastly remember that if it doesn't feel right when being trained say something and ask why because most if not all who work in a gym will tell you its for cardio purposes only when they teach.


    Hope those help some. icon_cool.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 01, 2010 1:00 PM GMT
    ThatCrash saidI recently joined a gym in downtown Chicago, and it has punching bags and for some reason I've always wanted to box. I just don't know how to start out without making a complete fool out of myself!

    Any tips?

    Are you just interested in hitting a punching bag, which can be good exercise, or actually sparing with other guys? The danger of brain injury is high, the term "punch drunk" not for nothing.

    Many incidents of head trauma (though not from boxing) is what likely brought about my epilepsy, along with memory and other problems. Our brains don't like to be bounced around. Don't jostle yours.
  • neosyllogy

    Posts: 1714

    Nov 01, 2010 1:18 PM GMT
    Take a class, make a complete fool of yourself. Then keep making a fool of yourself for months, regularly, then eventually get decent.
    S'your best bet.

    Caveat: If you eventually go to a decent gym with real fighters, then once you become decent you'll still feel like you're making a fool of yourself, simply because your standards will have changed. Then you're probably in good hands. icon_wink.gif
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    Nov 01, 2010 3:36 PM GMT
    Just go all in buddy! Don't be afraid, but like many - watch a class or two; begin small and then jump right on in and hit it hard. Training isn't for the weak in boxing - your body will be sore.

    At the gym during weight training - focus primarly on building agility within your core. Target your training on core & cardio.

    Oh - last thing! Buy two to three pairs of wrist wraps until you can beat the bag...believe me.
  • SoDakGuy

    Posts: 1862

    Mar 03, 2011 6:48 PM GMT
    Definitely take a class where you use the bag and pads as your opponent. A gym I use to go to had boxing classes, but they told their clients not to imagine their bags as another person. icon_eek.gif

    I'm floored! That's how you progress thinking this bag is someone who wants to knock you out.

  • Mar 03, 2011 7:06 PM GMT
    I started boxing November 2010 so a neophyte. I had the same feelings--what an ass I was making of myself each time I tried a new combination, but you know what? It got easier, I got more confidence and much due to my trainer who looked me square int he face when I had flubbed something and said I was a but ashamed--"Hey! There is no shame in this sport hall--there is no shame in sports!"

    Best advice I got in my life, and wish to hell I had started being a jock when I was young and intimidated by the other jocks in school.

  • Mar 03, 2011 8:16 PM GMT
    I started boxing 12 years ago, then moved into muay thai, san shou, and jiu jitsu--ultimately leading me into MMA 8 years ago. Although I've had to ease up on my training because I'm involved with other activities and needed to give my body a break--I can tell you that there's nothing like the rush you get from training/sparring/fighting...and it's amazing what it can do for your self-confidence!

    You absolutely should work with an instructor! If you go to a generic boxing class, you're just going to learn really basic techniques and you won't be getting the personalized attention that is critical to ensure you're not picking up bad habits. It may be a good idea to go to a class regularly, and meet with an instructor one-on-one every few weeks (if you go every week, it could get expensive!).

    Also, much better to go to a real boxing or MMA gym instead of going to a boxing class at your local gym.

    Anyway, good luck and enjoy the pain!!!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 16, 2011 3:25 AM GMT
    Prepare to devote 10,000 hours. That is what it takes to become anything close to good. My best most experience trainer still says he is still learning. And that is with multiple belts awarded and about 100 fights. For this Muay Thai devotee, boxing without kicking is like a bird without wings. Look at it this way, you have two additional weapons.

    And yes! There is nothing like the exhilarating feeling of a good sparring session.