Asperger?

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    Nov 02, 2010 7:45 AM GMT
    How many think they possibly have this?

    -I look at my behaviors, and I conclude that this is a possibility.
    -my therapist brought this up to me
    -I don't like it
    -I show about 75% of characteristics
    -the diagnosis occurs in late 20s

    - also have absence of acoustic reflex bilaterally but hearing within normal limits (WNL)
    - Auditory Brain Systems (ABR) is normal
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    Nov 02, 2010 10:19 AM GMT
    hauptstimme saidHow many think they possibly have this?

    -I look at my behaviors, and I conclude that this is a possibility.
    -my therapist brought this up to me
    -I don't like it
    -I show about 75% of characteristics
    -the diagnosis occurs in late 20s

    - also have absence of acoustic reflex bilaterally but hearing within normal limits (WNL)
    - Auditory Brain Systems (ABR) is normal



    I have it, as well as ADD.
  • LJay

    Posts: 11612

    Nov 02, 2010 1:47 PM GMT
    And?
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    Nov 02, 2010 1:58 PM GMT
    I honestly don't know... but I could think my way into having a brain tumor if I really tried, so I am not going to take a guess.
  • LJay

    Posts: 11612

    Nov 02, 2010 2:12 PM GMT
    Oh! that is not nice. Please do not do so. We like having you here.
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    Nov 02, 2010 2:17 PM GMT
    LJay saidAnd?


    en wat?
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    Nov 02, 2010 3:47 PM GMT
    Here are the 'official' US clinical criteria for Asperger's Syndrome (AS).

    My 13 yr old son was diagnosed at age three and also has ADHD, sensory integration difficulties, epilepsy and other conditions all of which show up in people on the autism spectrum more than in others. With extensive work, he does well in a mainstream school, but will likely have to work around his AS for his whole life.

    If you think you or someone close to you is on the autism spectrum, I urge you to arrange an evaluation with a neuropsychologist with experience in working with people on the spectrum. Then consider whether counseling or remedial services make sense. The good news is that a lot of money and research are currently being focussed on conditions on the autism spectrum. So there are lots of options and support groups, etc out there. There is also a recognition that there are lots of adults out there who did not have the advantage of early diagnosis; and there are programs designed to work with those people. One major focus now is early screening - even pre-natal screening - so that accommodations and support can be provided as early as possible.

    Diagnostic Criteria for 299.80 Asperger's Disorder


    [The following is from Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: DSM IV]

    (I) Qualitative impairment in social interaction, as manifested by at least two of the following:

    (A) marked impairments in the use of multiple nonverbal behaviors such as eye-to-eye gaze, facial expression, body posture, and gestures to regulate social interaction
    (B) failure to develop peer relationships appropriate to developmental level
    (C) a lack of spontaneous seeking to share enjoyment, interest or achievements with other people, (e.g.. by a lack of showing, bringing, or pointing out objects of interest to other people)
    (D) lack of social or emotional reciprocity

    (II) Restricted repetitive & stereotyped patterns of behavior, interests and activities, as manifested by at least one of the following:
    (A) encompassing preoccupation with one or more stereotyped and restricted patterns of interest that is abnormal either in intensity or focus
    (B) apparently inflexible adherence to specific, nonfunctional routines or rituals
    (C) stereotyped and repetitive motor mannerisms (e.g. hand or finger flapping or twisting, or complex whole-body movements)
    (D) persistent preoccupation with parts of objects

    (III) The disturbance causes clinically significant impairments in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning.

    (IV) There is no clinically significant general delay in language (E.G. single words used by age 2 years, communicative phrases used by age 3 years)

    (V) There is no clinically significant delay in cognitive development or in the development of age-appropriate self help skills, adaptive behavior (other than in social interaction) and curiosity about the environment in childhood.

    (VI) Criteria are not met for another specific Pervasive Developmental Disorder or Schizophrenia."
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    Nov 02, 2010 3:51 PM GMT
    hauptstimme saidHow many think they possibly have this?

    -I look at my behaviors, and I conclude that this is a possibility.
    -my therapist brought this up to me
    -I don't like it
    -I show about 75% of characteristics
    -the diagnosis occurs in late 20s

    - also have absence of acoustic reflex bilaterally but hearing within normal limits (WNL)
    - Auditory Brain Systems (ABR) is normal


    Not much you can do about it. Learn to live with it.
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    Nov 02, 2010 6:12 PM GMT
    I am a therapist who has seen his fair share of AS clients over the years and the diagnosis is often given from ages 5 and up but many of the interactional behaviorals and non-verbal cues are seen earlier by parents who bring their children in for evaluation.

    My experience has taught me that, like with most disorders, there is a range of intensity and severity but certain hallmark criteria tend to be met across the board. Ulitmtely, not every AS client is created equal.

    Sometimes psychological testing can point to AS when there is a large gap between performance and verbal scores on an IQ test. Since I do not do testing I refer out for that.

    One of the greatest challenges people with AS tend to experience is the ability to interpret social cues particularly ambiguous ones. Sarcasm is often very difficult for a person with AS to understand it as sarcasm when it's intent is to be humorous.

    One thing I have often encountered in providing therapy is that when you teach certain social skills to a person with AS they will lkely struggle with transferring those skills to similar situations. One psychologist who trained me used to call this "synthetic ego functions" - meaning that the client learns a skill set related to a very particular set of circumstances but cannot apply it more broadly so it appears that there has not been any learning.

    Repitition of practicing skills is necessary with consistent and constant reinforcement for these folks to get better at social interaction. Like another poster said there are many other comorbid issues that are seen with AS including but not limited to ADHD, OCD and myriad learning problems.

    Keep in mind though that if you go through the Diagnostic Manual of Mental Disorders, you could pretty much find 5 or more things that could seemingly fit any of us at any time. To make a clear diagnosis in my opinion is teasing intensity of symptoms, frequency, duration and finally level of impact on your life.

    Good luck in discovering more about this.
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    Nov 02, 2010 6:15 PM GMT
    there are good parts to it i heard,like special talents,so... take the good things with the bad [like everyone else,lol]
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    Nov 02, 2010 6:24 PM GMT
    pjp201 saidI am a therapist who has seen his fair share of AS clients over the years and the diagnosis is often given from ages 5 and up but many of the interactional behaviorals and non-verbal cues are seen earlier by parents who bring their children in for evaluation.

    My experience has taught me that, like with most disorders, there is a range of intensity and severity but certain hallmark criteria tend to be met across the board. Ulitmtely, not every AS client is created equal.

    Sometimes psychological testing can point to AS when there is a large gap between performance and verbal scores on an IQ test. Since I do not do testing I refer out for that.

    One of the greatest challenges people with AS tend to experience is the ability to interpret social cues particularly ambiguous ones. Sarcasm is often very difficult for a person with AS to understand it as sarcasm when it's intent is to be humorous.

    One thing I have often encountered in providing therapy is that when you teach certain social skills to a person with AS they will lkely struggle with transferring those skills to similar situations. One psychologist who trained me used to call this "synthetic ego functions" - meaning that the client learns a skill set related to a very particular set of circumstances but cannot apply it more broadly so it appears that there has not been any learning.

    Repitition of practicing skills is necessary with consistent and constant reinforcement for these folks to get better at social interaction. Like another poster said there are many other comorbid issues that are seen with AS including but not limited to ADHD, OCD and myriad learning problems.

    Keep in mind though that if you go through the Diagnostic Manual of Mental Disorders, you could pretty much find 5 or more things that could seemingly fit any of us at any time. To make a clear diagnosis in my opinion is teasing intensity of symptoms, frequency, duration and finally level of impact on your life.

    Good luck in discovering more about this.


    Good stuff.

    I known several folks that have AS, and, it can be amazing how talented they are, but, at the very same time, so very clueless.
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    Nov 02, 2010 7:03 PM GMT
    Ive posted a whole thread about this before

    http://www.realjock.com/gayforums/1152850

    And so did Skotty

    http://www.realjock.com/gayforums/1203034
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    Nov 02, 2010 8:27 PM GMT
    i have ADD
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    Nov 03, 2010 2:09 AM GMT
    hauptstimme saidHow many think they possibly have this?

    -I look at my behaviors, and I conclude that this is a possibility.
    -my therapist brought this up to me
    -I don't like it
    -I show about 75% of characteristics
    -the diagnosis occurs in late 20s

    - also have absence of acoustic reflex bilaterally but hearing within normal limits (WNL)
    - Auditory Brain Systems (ABR) is normal


    my husband as aspberger....and does very well prefessionally. He doesnt like large crowds and has his unique qualities.

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    Nov 03, 2010 5:51 AM GMT
    I was diagnosed around the age of 8. At this point, I think it was a false diagnosis.