Old American Folk Music

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    Nov 05, 2010 4:18 AM GMT
    I jsut saw this today, my new incredible musical discovery...

    An absolute jewel in the sparkling tapestry of American folk music, rife with perfect socio-political satire coupled to a joyful soulful and singable tune, assuring you will never forget it or its important socio-cultural message ...

    an unforgettable piece of the much-forgotton and bygone era of the rich American folk culture, soon to become usurped, much like it alludes to on its own, to the sad, braindead "little boxes made of ticky tacky" in American music... our rich cultural heritage, with all its deep meaning and social significance, overtaken by valueless pop and commercialism...

    Enjoy icon_biggrin.gif



    Post me some cool folk music mates icon_biggrin.gif
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    Nov 05, 2010 6:58 PM GMT
    amar_m said


    Great idea. I still get chills listening to this music. Malvina Reynolds remains an inspiring figure, and this song is a keeper. Here is another favorite by Pete Seeger:



    For those interested to know more about the song, and the context in which it was written, here is the short description that appears on YouTube next to the video:

    "On July 26, 1956, the House of Representatives voted 373 to 9 to cite Pete Seeger and seven others (including playwright Arthur Miller) for contempt, as they failed to cooperate with House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC) in their attempts to investigate alleged subversives and communists. Pete Seeger testified before the HUAC in 1955. In one of Pete's darkest moments, when his personal freedom, his career, and his safety were in jeopardy, a flash of inspiration ignited this song.

    The song was stirred by a passage from Mikhail Sholokhov's novel "And Quie Flows the Don". Around the world the song traveled and in 1962 at a UNICEF concert in Germany, Marlene Dietrich, Academy Award-nominated German-born American actress, first performed the song in French, as "Qui peut dire ou vont les fleurs?" Shortly after she sang it in German. The song's impact in Germany just after WWII was shattering.

    It's universal message, "let there be peace in the world" did not get lost in its translation. To the contrary, the combination of the language, the setting, and the great lyrics has had a profound effect on people all around the world. May it have the same effect today and bring renewed awareness to all that hear it."


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    Nov 05, 2010 7:04 PM GMT
    Have had the pleasure of meeting Pete Seeger and he remains an inspiration at age 91.

    Sunday Routine | Pete Seeger
    ‘Letters to Answer, and Logs to Split’

    New York Times
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    Nov 05, 2010 7:14 PM GMT
    njmeanwhile saidHave had the pleasure of meeting Pete Seeger and he remains an inspiration at age 91.

    Sunday Routine | Pete Seeger
    ‘Letters to Answer, and Logs to Split’

    New York Times



    That was a really great read.

    "Fresh corn only needs to be boiled for two minutes. The trick is to not put too much corn in the pot and lower the water temperature. I just learned that."

    Just beautiful. Thanks icon_biggrin.gif
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    Nov 05, 2010 7:19 PM GMT
    You're welcome! He lives just northwest of the city near Beacon and is a fixture in town there. I should also add that the son of his best friend Woodie Guthrie (Arlo Guthrie) performs annually at Carnegie Hall on Thanksgiving weekend. My family is represented in some form at that show every year, this year being no exception. I think he will be accompanied by the Kentucky Symphony this year (the cast of characters always varies). Until recently Pete was almost always part of it.
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    Nov 05, 2010 7:23 PM GMT
    I love that song. Its the Weeds theme song. icon_biggrin.gif
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    Nov 05, 2010 7:59 PM GMT


    "Goodnight, Irene" by Leadbelly has been covered by everybody from Woodie Guthrie to Barry Gibb (I'm afraid to listen to that version) to the Pogues. I think I like Peter, Paul, and Mary's version the best. Can't find that but here's them doing a Dylan classic:



    This was especially cool because the audience was Japanese but they knew the words.



    Woodie Guthrie wrote "This Land is Your Land" but his son Arlo didn't know that when he went to school and all the kids but him knew the words. Once while in tour in China he was surprised the kids there knew the song too. When he told his mother it didn't make much sense for kids in Asia to be singing about "From California to the New York Island" ... his mother rolled her eyes and said, "Oh, Arlo! Nobody said they had to go the short way!"

    My favorite verse to that song (and there are probably hundreds that different performers have added over the years is)

    "As I was walking, I saw a sign there
    and on the sign said "No trespassing"
    But on the other side, it didn't say nothin'
    This land, was made for you and me"