The English (British) accent...

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    Nov 08, 2010 1:44 PM GMT
    I think most accents originating from Britain you almost can swim in. There are exceptions of course, but really the majority of them are amazing.


    Here's to you our English brothers!

    British%20Flag%20Waving.jpg
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    Nov 08, 2010 1:56 PM GMT
    Why thank you sir.
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    Nov 08, 2010 2:19 PM GMT
    I was interested to learn from British Army Officers with whom I served in Germany 1978-80 that when they attended the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, they were given diction lessons to acquire (or perfect) an upper-class British accent. Since accent tends to infer class status & authority, it was thought proper & advantageous that Army Officers sound the part, or so I was told.

    And indeed, I thought the Officers did all sound very much alike (except the Scottish Regiments), certainly no Manchester or Liverpool accents among them, so perhaps there really is a Sandhurst accent. I wonder if this is still done at the RMA today?
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    Nov 08, 2010 2:25 PM GMT
    I acquired mine from a british private school abroad.. not directly from the uk however. I believe it was RP
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    Nov 08, 2010 2:27 PM GMT
    Those accents are delicious!
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    Nov 08, 2010 2:27 PM GMT
    Art_Deco saidI was interested to learn from British Army Officers with whom I served in Germany 1978-80 that when they attended the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, they were given diction lessons to acquire (or perfect) an upper-class British accent. Since accent tends to infer class status & authority, it was thought proper & advantageous that Army Officers sound the part, or so I was told.

    And indeed, I thought the Officers did all sound very much alike, certainly no Manchester or Liverpool accents among them, so perhaps there really is a Sandhurst accent. I wonder if this is still done at the RMA today?


    I live about 10 minutes away from the RMA Sandhurst, I don't think the majority of them have an upper-class accent icon_lol.gif
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    Nov 08, 2010 2:31 PM GMT
    NickFit saidI live about 10 minutes away from the RMA Sandhurst, I don't think the majority of them have an upper-class accent icon_lol.gif

    Ah, then perhaps not done anymore, I was wondering. And then I was being told this by fellow Captains & Majors, who would have attended Sandhurst some years earlier than 1978. But I can say that every British Officer I encountered, excepting the Scots as I said, did have a very similar upper class accent at that time.

    Which I enjoyed hearing, BTW. And that I had to avoid copying, because I tend to mimic accents without even thinking about it. I caught myself doing that a few times and got some nasty looks from Officers who thought I might be mocking them.
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    Nov 08, 2010 2:41 PM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    NickFit saidI live about 10 minutes away from the RMA Sandhurst, I don't think the majority of them have an upper-class accent icon_lol.gif

    Ah, then perhaps not done anymore, I was wondering. And then I was being told this by fellow Captains & Majors, who would have attended Sandhurst some years earlier than 1978. But I can say that every British Officer I encountered, excepting the Scots as I said, did have a very similar upper class accent at that time.

    Which I enjoyed hearing, BTW. And that I had to avoid copying, because I tend to mimic accents without even thinking about it. I caught myself doing that a few times and got some nasty looks from Officers who thought I might be mocking them.


    Haha, yeah it can be really easy to pick up someone's accent and start talking that way around them!

    My own accent is not cut-glass posh British (which most of Britain regards as really rather cringeworthy), but I'm fairly well-spoken. I don't drop h's or t's on words like many people do around here, and I don't have a Cockney London accent geezer!
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    Nov 08, 2010 4:28 PM GMT
    English people are evil.
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    Nov 08, 2010 4:43 PM GMT
    mnboy saidEnglish people are evil.


    Hey, how very dare you... no actually, it's fair icon_twisted.gif
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    Nov 08, 2010 5:08 PM GMT
    It is actually conjectured that the Great Vowel Shift occured due to people trying to create a class distinction in their speech.
  • aiko14

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    Nov 08, 2010 5:54 PM GMT
    prefered scottish accent over english
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    Nov 08, 2010 7:50 PM GMT
    NickFit saidMy own accent is not cut-glass posh British (which most of Britain regards as really rather cringeworthy),


    I speak like that and it´s not cringeworthy. Twat.
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    Nov 08, 2010 8:23 PM GMT
    I like the ones you can hardly understand.

    Total shit when playing on LIVE, probably because I'm stuck between arousal and confusion.
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    Nov 08, 2010 8:38 PM GMT
    PrinceOfArya saidI acquired mine from a british private school abroad.. not directly from the uk however. I believe it was RP


    yeah, the british call their private schools "public schools".

    i never got that.
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    Nov 08, 2010 8:41 PM GMT
    xassantex said
    PrinceOfArya saidI acquired mine from a british private school abroad.. not directly from the uk however. I believe it was RP


    yeah, the british call their private schools "public schools".

    i never got that.


    It´s because the other option at the time was to have a private tutor or governess. If you didn´t do that you could go to a "public" school where any riff raff could go.
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    Nov 08, 2010 9:04 PM GMT
    Lostboy said
    NickFit saidMy own accent is not cut-glass posh British (which most of Britain regards as really rather cringeworthy),


    I speak like that and it´s not cringeworthy. Twat.


    Voice clip/vid of you talking or it didn't happen ( i know that doesn't make grammatical sense, but I care not ;)
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    Nov 08, 2010 9:56 PM GMT
    I like the choice of words they use sometimes,but when you try to use them in a North American accent you sound soo fucking stupid lol.
  • Webster666

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    Nov 08, 2010 10:06 PM GMT
    I like the British accents, Irish is okay, hate the Scottish accent.
    And the Welsh accent sounds like gibberish.
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    Nov 08, 2010 10:14 PM GMT
    Sage_Humour said
    Lostboy said
    NickFit saidMy own accent is not cut-glass posh British (which most of Britain regards as really rather cringeworthy),


    I speak like that and it´s not cringeworthy. Twat.


    Voice clip/vid of you talking or it didn't happen ( i know that doesn't make grammatical sense, but I care not ;)


    just listen to this. I sound like this

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    Nov 08, 2010 11:21 PM GMT
    NickFit saidI don't drop h's or t's on words like many people do around here, and I don't have a Cockney London accent geezer!

    We have a local friend who owns a Brit store called Pond Hoppers, and he has the most adorable, unadulterated Manchester accent. Or Mawn-chestah as he says it.

    And it makes me love the wonderful varieties the English language supports all around the globe, countless numbers of different accents, just so long as I can still understand them. We have a Dutch friend who stays with us each year, speaks perfect English, but with his own delightful accent. And a lesbian friend of ours is currently dating a woman with a German sound to her English. And then we go to a couple of French restaurants and hear that variation. I really do love English.

    pond-hoppers-logo.jpg

    http://www.pondhoppers.net/

    And you can hear the owner's Manchester accent on the video in this link. BTW, this is the ONLY place I buy my tea, as well as kipper snacks and sardines. Plus they have some decent marzipan, and a better assortment of Cadbury chocolates than I find elsewhere.
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    Nov 08, 2010 11:49 PM GMT
    Webster666 saidI like the British accents, Irish is okay, hate the Scottish accent.
    And the Welsh accent sounds like gibberish.




    SPOT ON!!!!!!!!!!!
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    Nov 08, 2010 11:56 PM GMT
    Art_Deco saidI was interested to learn from British Army Officers with whom I served in Germany 1978-80 that when they attended the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, they were given diction lessons to acquire (or perfect) an upper-class British accent. Since accent tends to infer class status & authority, it was thought proper & advantageous that Army Officers sound the part, or so I was told.

    And indeed, I thought the Officers did all sound very much alike (except the Scottish Regiments), certainly no Manchester or Liverpool accents among them, so perhaps there really is a Sandhurst accent. I wonder if this is still done at the RMA today?


    Such an attitude makes me laugh! All this pretence of national/class/cultural/rank/imperial superiority.

    It's just rank hypocrisy!

    Do I sound harsh or demeaning?

    The trouble is, no matter who you are, whether you speak posh or not, whether you're educated or not, whether you are a high rank military officer or just a private, whether you are rich or poor...

    You still eat, drink, sleep, belch, fart, your shit still stinks, you still use toilet paper, you have peed in the bushes/against the wall, you have picked your nose and it remains stuck to your finger, you suffered bad breath, you still get a boner, you have jacked off, staining the bedsheets, secretly flicked your cum across the room, you lied to get out of trouble, you still become ill and eventually you'll die - and either end up as food for maggots or become a bag of ashes, scattered across the field which was once your home...

    Ah, yes - life is vanity, says the Preacher - Vanity of vanities...

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    Nov 09, 2010 12:21 AM GMT
    NotThatOld saidThe trouble is, no matter who you are, whether you speak posh or not, whether you're educated or not, whether you are a high rank military officer or just a private, whether you are rich or poor...

    Actually I did run into this animosity you express when I was in Germany. Among my staff were several local civilian employees, or LNs as we called them (Local Nationals). Except one wasn't German, but rather Irish. I didn't know his resident status, really not my concern, enough for me to know that he was already hired through the proper US Army channels and on the job before I took over there.

    And he had this incredibly hostile attitude to authority, and particularly to military Officers such as myself. A constant thorn in my side, he approached everything as class warfare. The labyrinth of LN employment regulations prevented me from disciplining him directly, nor easily having any actions taken within my typically brief tenure before I was rotated out, and he knew it.

    Your comments do rather remind me of him, and his framing every issue in terms of class conflict. I understand this is not uncommon in the UK, given its strong traditions of class divisions. But I don't come from the aristocracy, I earned what I have for myself. It's true I was raised with certain advantages, but those faded with time, and in the end I was left with nothing more than my own wits & ability.

    And so I personally resented his attitude, being more democratic as an American than he may have been able to understand. Even if I was an Officer, and even if I admired the professionalism and polish of British Officers with whom I served, that quite frankly used to be the envy of many of us Americans.
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    Nov 09, 2010 9:35 AM GMT
    Lostboy said
    Sage_Humour said
    Lostboy said
    NickFit saidMy own accent is not cut-glass posh British (which most of Britain regards as really rather cringeworthy),


    I speak like that and it´s not cringeworthy. Twat.


    Voice clip/vid of you talking or it didn't happen ( i know that doesn't make grammatical sense, but I care not ;)


    just listen to this. I sound like this



    Oh that's similar to me actually - I was meaning that 'horsey' posh types are the cringeworthy ones...you know, the ones who say "Ears, Ears Off Cors" when they are saying "Yes, Yes of course"!

    Twat.