Progressive California's economy is deeply in debt...

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    Nov 10, 2010 5:22 AM GMT
    but REPUBLICAN Texas is in WORSE shape.

    http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dws/dn/latestnews/stories/1024dntexbudgetmess.274b11d.html

    A fact that the TX Repub pols hid from the TX voting public until after the election, to help themselves get reelected.

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    Nov 10, 2010 6:50 AM GMT
    Lets see how long it'll take for Southbeach to troll this post.
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    Nov 10, 2010 3:55 PM GMT
    California's budget gap is twice as bad, so this is a fail -- and of course, you are an ongoing fail.

    ...What both states do have in common is an illegal immigration problem.
  • conservativej...

    Posts: 2465

    Nov 10, 2010 4:01 PM GMT
    Oh, I think Texans know where to focus in the coming months. This is going to be interesting.
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    Nov 10, 2010 4:12 PM GMT
    mocktwinkie saidCalifornia's budget gap is twice as bad, so this is a fail -- and of course, you are an ongoing fail.

    ...What both states do have in common is an illegal immigration problem.


    Did you read the article? It said that Texas' gap was proportionally twice as bad as California's?
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    Nov 10, 2010 4:31 PM GMT
    Christian73 said
    mocktwinkie saidCalifornia's budget gap is twice as bad, so this is a fail -- and of course, you are an ongoing fail.

    ...What both states do have in common is an illegal immigration problem.


    Did you read the article? It said that Texas' gap was proportionally twice as bad as California's?


    No, it said proportionately larger, not twice as large.

    So let's look at what is contributing to the budget shortfall. And keep in mind this is from 2004. Things are much, much worse now.

    "While these massive budget deficits cannot be attributed to any single source, the enormous impact of large-scale illegal immigration cannot be ignored. The total K-12 school expenditure for illegal immigrants costs the states nearly $12 billion annually, and when the children born here to illegal aliens are added, the costs more than double to $28.6 billion.1

    This enormous expenditure of the taxpayers’ hard-earned contributions does not, however, represent the total costs. Special programs for non-English speakers are an additional fiscal burden as well as a hindrance to the overall learning environment. A recent study found that dual language programs represent an additional expense of $290 to $879 per pupil depending on the size of the class.2 In addition, because these children of illegal aliens come from families that are most often living in poverty, there is also a major expenditure for them on supplemental feeding programs in the schools. Those ancillary expenditures have not been included in the calculations in this report.

    10847.jpg

    "In California, the $7.7 billion spent annually educating the children of illegal immigrants—nearly 13% of the overall 20045 education budget—could:

    * Cover the education budget shortfall for the 2004-05 school year, estimated by the Legislative Analyst Office at $6 billion and nearly cover the $2 billion reduction this year from the Proposition 98 formula.
    * Or, the remaining $1.7 billion could pay the salaries of about 31,000 teachers and reduce per student ratios, or it could furnish 2.8 million new computers—enough computers for about half of the state’s students.
    * Prevent educational shortfalls estimated at $9.8 billion over the past four years that have impacted on “…class size, teacher layoffs, shorter library hours and fewer counselors, nurses, custodians and groundskeepers.” (See Los Angeles Times, March 11, 2005)

    In Texas, the $3.9 billion spent annually educating the children of illegal immigrants could:

    * Cover more than the $2.3 billion shortfall identified by the Texas Federation for Teachers for such things as textbooks and pension contributions.
    * Make Texas’ salaries for teachers more competitive by national standards, thereby reducing costly attrition, and recruit the 5,000 new teachers needed each year.


    In New York, the $3.1 billion spent annually educating the children of illegal immigrants could:

    * Nearly cover the estimated $3.3 billion required by the state’s Supreme Court under the decision in the Campaign for Fiscal Equity case to establish equitable state funding for New York City’s public school system.
    * Help to reduce the $1.8 billion revenue shortfall for fiscal year 2005 in New York City.
    * Provide enough additional funding to nearly meet the $3 billion in health care cuts in the current proposed budget for payments to hospitals and nursing homes.

    In Illinois, the $2 billion spent annually educating the children of illegal immigrants could:

    * Balance the current state budget—estimated to be $2 billion in the red—and make unnecessary adoption of the new taxes in the Education Funding Reform Act of 2005.
    * Help close the potential gap resulting from decreased federal 2006 funding to the state of between $1.07$1.35 billion.9

    In New Jersey, the $1.5 billion spent annually educating the children of illegal immigrants could:

    * Go a long way toward solving the dilemma Gov. Codey noted on March 1, 2005, when he said, “I wish I could be here discussing a major investment in higher education or an expansion of health care because those are investments New Jersey needs to make, but I can't have those discussions, not with this [fiscal] mess in front of us.”
    * Help close the potential gap resulting from decreased federal 2006 funding to the state of between $682$845 million.

    In Florida, the $1.2 billion spent annually educating the children of illegal immigrants could:

    * Fund the services eliminated as a result of a cut in federal funding to Florida public schools estimated by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities to be $565 million over the next five years beginning in 2006. Over the same period, the Center estimated an additional $321 million has been lost to the state for adult and vocational education as well as $3.2 billion in grants to the state and local governments and $392 million in “Strengthening America’s Communities” block grants.
    * Help close the potential gap resulting from decreased federal 2006 funding to the state of between $1.52$1.89 billion.

    In Georgia, the $952 million spent annually educating the children of illegal immigrants could:

    * Raise the performance of the state’s schools described by Gov. Perdue in his 2003 State of the State Address in these terms, “Georgia’s education system is not what it should be. The National Assessment of Education Progress is the nation’s education report card. It shows Georgia is behind the national average on reading, writing, math, and science. For each of those subjects more than 50% of Georgia children are below the proficient level. Georgia also has one of the lowest high school graduation rates in the nation. And, to our shame, we rank 50th in SAT scores. We can sum up our report card in two words: “Needs improvement.”
    * Help close the potential gap resulting from decreased federal 2006 funding to the state of between $847$1,071 million.

    In North Carolina, the $771 million spent annually educating illegal immigrant children could:

    * Redress part of a $1.2 billion state budget shortfall and obviate the need for new taxes proposed by Gov. Mike Easley for the 2006 budget.
    * Help close the potential gap resulting from decreased federal 2006 funding to the state of between $888$1,129 million.

    In Arizona, the $748 million spent annually educating illegal immigrant children could:

    * Improve state funding for education, which in this year’s Quality Counts 2005 state-by-state education report ranked Arizona 50th in per-pupil spending. To close the gap with the national average in spending per student would cost the state an additional $1.6 billion.
    * Help close the potential gap resulting from decreased federal 2006 funding to the state of between $587$763 million.

    In Colorado, the $564 million spent annually educating illegal immigrant children could:

    * Reduce the state budget deficit estimated at $900 million in the 2003’04 budget, and more recently by the Independence Institute at around $158 million for 2006.
    * Help close the potential gap resulting from decreased federal 2006 funding to the state of between $270$337 million." -----http://www.fairus.org/site/News2?page=NewsArticle&id=17193&security=1601&news_iv_ctrl=1901
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14345

    Nov 10, 2010 10:34 PM GMT
    New York is in the worst shape of all the states yet we keep electing and reelecting establishment career politicians that are largely responsible for the horrendous budget mess in Albany. At least Texas has a 9 billion+ rainy day fund to fall back on. We have nothing in New York except towering stacks of IOUs and tax increases.
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    Nov 10, 2010 10:41 PM GMT
    roadbikeRob saidNew York is in the worst shape of all the states yet we keep electing and reelecting establishment career politicians that are largely responsible for the horrendous budget mess in Albany. At least Texas has a 9 billion+ rainy day fund to fall back on. We have nothing in New York except towering stacks of IOUs and tax increases.


    Expecting New York to EVER vote for fiscal sanity is impossible. They are like california, completely doomed.
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    Nov 10, 2010 10:49 PM GMT
    California needs to legalize the Mexicans so we can tax them. After all, they work harder (and play harder apparently) than anyone else. They deserve citizenship and they deserve to give us their hard earned money that comes with it. icon_biggrin.gif
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    Nov 11, 2010 12:01 AM GMT
    JAKEBENSON saidCalifornia needs to legalize the Mexicans so we can tax them. After all, they work harder (and play harder apparently) than anyone else. They deserve citizenship and they deserve to give us their hard earned money that comes with it. icon_biggrin.gif


    Absolutely absurd proposal. Are you serious? Do you realize the precedent that would set for the future? So in 10 years we'll do the same thing, and then we'll do it again and again? Why even have such a thing as citizens to begin with? You do realize that most of the people you're referring to have very little money to even get taxed, right? They will basically just be supported by everyone else anyway in the hopes that the next generation will finally be more self-sustainable. And talk about increasing the gap between rich and poor even more. The more third world immigration that occurs the bigger the gap between rich and poor because the income per head goes down.
  • rioriz

    Posts: 1056

    Nov 11, 2010 12:21 AM GMT
    mocktwinkie said
    JAKEBENSON saidCalifornia needs to legalize the Mexicans so we can tax them. After all, they work harder (and play harder apparently) than anyone else. They deserve citizenship and they deserve to give us their hard earned money that comes with it. icon_biggrin.gif


    Absolutely absurd proposal. Are you serious? Do you realize the precedent that would set for the future? So in 10 years we'll do the same thing, and then we'll do it again and again? Why even have such a thing as citizens to begin with? You do realize that most of the people you're referring to have very little money to even get taxed, right? They will basically just be supported by everyone else anyway in the hopes that the next generation will finally be more self-sustainable. And talk about increasing the gap between rich and poor even more. The more third world immigration that occurs the bigger the gap between rich and poor because the income per head goes down.


    I actually quite agree with this statement. Most illegal immigrants are working for very very little and do not have taxed jobs. The people that hire them do so because of cheap labor and no government involvement. As said above the increase in supposed tax return would be almost invisible. And because of their poverty level there will be a need for more state and federal funded program funding that the state simply just cannot afford. Immigration needs to be tackled but this is not the way to do it.
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    Nov 11, 2010 3:49 AM GMT
    Christian73 said
    mocktwinkie saidCalifornia's budget gap is twice as bad, so this is a fail -- and of course, you are an ongoing fail.

    ...What both states do have in common is an illegal immigration problem.


    Did you read the article? It said that Texas' gap was proportionally twice as bad as California's?




    Apparently, twinkie doesn't understand the meaning of the word "proportionally".