Are We Over the Hump as Gays??

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 14, 2010 11:42 PM GMT
    I have this feeling which has prevaled for the last couple of decades, that our struggles for equality and acceptance as normal folk is getting closer to the apex of the mountain, and that within the next 5-10 years, we will have attained a comfortable, although not a total, acceptance into the free world.

    I look back at 59 years, and wonder what all the struggle in my own life was about, everyone I have spoken to, family, friends, acquaintances, has accepted me without a blink.

    I know that is not the case everywhere, but we have been in the forefront in many ways in the past decade - in North America and Britain - gays in the UK and Canadian Armed Forces, Gay Marriage in Canada, hate laws, DADT challenges in the US, more and more people of notoriety coming out and much more acceptance by the younger gen.

    Long winded, sorry.....do you agree that we are close to the top of the mountain? Why?

    Again, I invite your intelligent and mature input.................Keithicon_cool.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 14, 2010 11:46 PM GMT
    I think there are many changes in the gay community thats been going on in the early century so far. There has been alot of changes and being gay now is more acceptable than it was at any time in history. I dont think we are over the hump yet as long as conservatives input there religious view into politics which it should be left out of. I say we are maybe 75% there but not fully close to the top yet.
  • Import

    Posts: 7190

    Nov 14, 2010 11:50 PM GMT
    Gradually more people are becoming a lot more understanding and accepting of gays.

    However we're not over the hump yet. Look at the recent spate of suicides and bullying.

    its a gradual process and it is progressing, at least I think anyway
  • masculumpedes

    Posts: 5549

    Nov 14, 2010 11:55 PM GMT
    I think that we still have a long way to go icon_sad.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 15, 2010 12:01 AM GMT
    I think the US is experiencing a change as significant and as unsettling as the back civil rights movementwas to the status quo then.

    The ferocity of the pushback is a reaction to its inexorability.


    i am eager to how much will have changed in the next 10 years.

    (But i think it will take longer than that before gays have equal rights.

    Interestingly this time it is the people who seem ahead of the legislators on this - so unlike the black civil rights movement (where public acceptance came AFTER legislated equality, this time the public acceptance is ahead of the laws.



  • disasterpiece

    Posts: 2991

    Nov 15, 2010 12:12 AM GMT
    vetteset saidI have this feeling which has prevaled for the last couple of decades, that our struggles for equality and acceptance as normal folk is getting closer to the apex of the mountain, and that within the next 5-10 years, we will have attained a comfortable, although not a total, acceptance into the free world.

    I look back at 59 years, and wonder what all the struggle in my own life was about, everyone I have spoken to, family, friends, acquaintances, has accepted me without a blink.

    I know that is not the case everywhere, but we have been in the forefront in many ways in the past decade - in North America and Britain - gays in the UK and Canadian Armed Forces, Gay Marriage in Canada, hate laws, DADT challenges in the US, more and more people of notoriety coming out and much more acceptance by the younger gen.

    Long winded, sorry.....do you agree that we are close to the top of the mountain? Why?

    Again, I invite your intelligent and mature input.................Keithicon_cool.gif


    If you're saying "we" in the name of Gays in North America and Western Europe, then I'd say yes. But for the Gays across the world, it's another story, unfortunately, and I'm not even sure we can talk about a mountain, but a huge iron curtain called culture and religion.

    Now, on a more joyful note, I think we've made a lot of progress. From my personal experience, which was been flawless until now (and as relieving as possible). We're close guys... And I'm sure it is definitely better on the top of the mountain ;)
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 15, 2010 12:14 AM GMT
    ^^end of the first paragraph "into the free world.........Keithicon_cool.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 15, 2010 2:47 AM GMT
    i don't think we are. we have laws and rights now but ppl's attitudes haven't changed much, and they are the hardest thing to change.

    i had a horrible childhood growing up gay, all the teasing and bs and hate that made me ashamed for years... over my lifetime, it's damaged me. and it's all still here, look at the shit on tv, the kids killing themselves because they're gay.. the laws and rights don't change the fact that i still feel bad for a kid growing up gay. when i can say i no longer feel that way, then i'd consider us close to equality and acceptance.

    we have definitely come a long way, at least icon_smile.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 15, 2010 2:56 AM GMT
    Yeah well, no thanks to those that stayed safely in the closet their whole lives, while the rest of us marched, protested, lobbied, took the risks, and made gays visible.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 15, 2010 3:16 AM GMT
    Gotta tell ya I as a pure homosexual in the land of Oz, am already there.

    When I first become active in the gay community, it was still illegal to be a homosexual, and it was still classed as a mental health issue and this allowed the police and military the right to kick out poofters and they where mentally unbalanced. But then AIDS come along and the whole thing took a big step backwards, and it all went pear shaped, but we have recovered from that now.

    I was one of the few people in my city to fight this, and we won. It is not longer illegal to be a poofter, nor is it on the mental health list anymore. Us homosexuals now have our relationships recognised as de-facto, so the government can tax us accordingly.

    So I as a pure homosexual feel that I now live in a time of equity. I don't play the victom, all my friends 99.9 of them straight are accepting of my sexuality and my employer too.

    So I am already there, and for me the fight is well and truly over.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 15, 2010 5:50 AM GMT
    Caslon16000 saidYeah well, no thanks to those that stayed safely in the closet their whole lives, while the rest of us marched, protested, lobbied, took the risks, and made gays visible.


    maybe some closeted with influence moved things more discretely but nonetheless concretely.
  • rdberg1957

    Posts: 662

    Nov 15, 2010 7:33 AM GMT
    I think the gay rights movement of the late 20th century is one of many periods in which the drive toward belonging and acceptance has been at least partially fulfilled (see John Boswell's Christianity, Social Tolerance and Homosexuality). At various times and in various communities over history, gay people have been a part of their communities rather than outcasts. I believe that the dominant theme over the history of humanity has been rejection by the larger community, with brief (maybe a couple hundred years at most) interludes of integration.
  • Gaymer

    Posts: 111

    Nov 15, 2010 9:55 AM GMT
    We still have a long way to go.

    I'm an avid gaymer, and although gamers don't make up a majority of the younger generations, they still make up a significant proportion when one includes games such as halo or other Xbox online games. In this ecclectic community, homophobia is the default entertainment. To be open-minded takes more effort apparently. I play WoW (shush, no sass =P), and gosh, the butthurt you get for speaking up against homophobia. Then again, WoW is a cesspit for the internet.

    However, in general, the homophobia has just shifted tactics. Instead of outright violence, it's become a sort of dismissal instead. People accept glbtq people when they have friends who are glbtq, but otherwise, people are default homophobic, it seems.

    Heterosexism will still prevail for quite a few generations as the dominant norm. icon_sad.gif
  • Hokenshi

    Posts: 387

    Nov 15, 2010 11:22 AM GMT
    True_blue_aussie saidGotta tell ya I as a pure homosexual in the land of Oz, am already there.


    Yeah the UK has also done everything that Americans are currently fighting for. There is still room for improvement to be sure but I would say we're a good few years ahead of you guys. (we'll put the kettle on and save you a seat)icon_razz.gif