Bigorexia soon to come as a mental disorder?

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    Nov 18, 2010 4:47 AM GMT
    If you don't know what it is here is a link, http://menshealth.about.com/cs/menonly/a/bigorexia.htm, today in class my professor was talking about disorders that have come up in recent years and suggest that bigorexia might soon be considered one.
    Your thoughts? I could see it being classified as a type of OCD or another type of personality disorder but I don't know about a mental disorder.
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    Nov 18, 2010 4:54 AM GMT
    I just hope the don't seriously name it that.

    Seems more of a subtle form of body dysmorphic disorder to me.
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    Nov 18, 2010 5:34 AM GMT
    Thats what I figured too. Something on the lesser side of things but not an actually mental disorder but my professor was dead serious about it.
    Sadly, that is what they are probably going to call it.
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    Nov 18, 2010 5:42 AM GMT
    Reverse anorexia? That's dumb. Because it's not like you die of not-starvation just because you're dissatisfied with your size. It's just psychologists grasping to create fictitious disorders because, otherwise, they'd be out of a job.
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    Nov 18, 2010 5:44 AM GMT
    Animus saidReverse anorexia? That's dumb. Because it's not like you die of not-starvation just because you're dissatisfied with your size. It's just psychologists grasping to create fictitious disorders because, otherwise, they'd be out of a job.


    That's how they create "most" of their disorders take a group of symptoms, vote, and you have a new disorder which you can hospitalize patients into.
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    Nov 18, 2010 5:49 AM GMT
    yeah, everything is a mental disorder or "illness."

    "Mental illness" is a social construct, to label, classify and 'treat' that which we do not understand about the mind.

    Do you know how something becomes a "mental illness"?
    The American Psychiatric Association (APA) takes a vote. That's all.

    The APA are also heavily connected to the pharmaceutical industry, which means that the more "illnesses" they literally make up, the more drugs that can be made to "treat" them.

    Homosexuality was considered a "mental illness" until the 1970s, when the APA voted to have it removed.

    So yes, I'm sure it WILL become a "mental disorder", just like all the other personality variants and psychological differences in the whole spectrum of human emotion and experience.
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    Nov 18, 2010 5:55 AM GMT
    Animus saidReverse anorexia? That's dumb. Because it's not like you die of not-starvation just because you're dissatisfied with your size. It's just psychologists grasping to create fictitious disorders because, otherwise, they'd be out of a job.


    Did you even read the website url I gave?
    It is obvious you either didn't or have a case and you are in denial.
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    Nov 18, 2010 5:55 AM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidI have known men who "suffer" from this condition. Total narcissist bullshit and I do not get along with them at all.


    Yeah, Narcissus didn't die because he had a "mental disorder", he died because he was so self-absorbed, he wasted away while staring in his own reflection.
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    Nov 18, 2010 5:58 AM GMT
    MeOhMy saidyeah, everything is a mental disorder or "illness."

    "Mental illness" is a social construct, to label, classify and 'treat' that which we do not understand about the mind.

    Do you know how something becomes a "mental illness"?
    The American Psychiatric Association (APA) takes a vote. That's all.

    The APA are also heavily connected to the pharmaceutical industry, which means that the more "illnesses" they literally make up, the more drugs that can be made to "treat" them.

    Homosexuality was considered a "mental illness" until the 1970s, when the APA voted to have it removed.

    So yes, I'm sure it WILL become a "mental disorder", just like all the other personality variants and psychological differences in the whole spectrum of human emotion and experience.


    Look through the current DSM-IV and you might realize you are being a bit paranoid.
    Yes, psychology use to have a habit of labeling everything they didn't understand as an illness but then again most earlier practices had some fucked up starts.
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    Nov 18, 2010 6:17 AM GMT
    MeOhMy said
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidI have known men who "suffer" from this condition. Total narcissist bullshit and I do not get along with them at all.


    Yeah, Narcissus didn't die because he had a "mental disorder", he died because he was so self-absorbed, he wasted away while staring in his own reflection.


    That's why in some languages, the flower known as daffodil is called "narcis".

    Etymological fact of the day icon_wink.gif
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    Nov 18, 2010 6:20 AM GMT
    mnboy said
    MeOhMy saidyeah, everything is a mental disorder or "illness."

    "Mental illness" is a social construct, to label, classify and 'treat' that which we do not understand about the mind.

    Do you know how something becomes a "mental illness"?
    The American Psychiatric Association (APA) takes a vote. That's all.

    The APA are also heavily connected to the pharmaceutical industry, which means that the more "illnesses" they literally make up, the more drugs that can be made to "treat" them.

    Homosexuality was considered a "mental illness" until the 1970s, when the APA voted to have it removed.

    So yes, I'm sure it WILL become a "mental disorder", just like all the other personality variants and psychological differences in the whole spectrum of human emotion and experience.


    Look through the current DSM-IV and you might realize you are being a bit paranoid.
    Yes, psychology use to have a habit of labeling everything they didn't understand as an illness but then again most earlier practices had some fucked up starts.


    Look through the current DSM-IV and you might realize it's a joke.

    A person has both a body and a mind. On this, we can agree.
    A body, while complex in its biology, is dictated to by the brain. An arm does not move of its own accord, but at the will of the mind. The mind governs the body, and the body works through biology.
    The mind, itself, however, is far more complex than the body. The body is but a vessel for the human mind. The human mind, while biologically manifest in the physical brain itself, is not governed by biology, but by that which we have yet to fully understand. Our environment - social, political, economic, cultural, etc. - all have direct bearings upon our individual mind.

    To determine "illness" in the body, a doctor checks the symptoms, then conducts tests based upon the symptoms, from which [s]he then draws a diagnosis. For matters of the mind, which are FAR more complex than those of the body, a psychiatrist identifies symptoms, and from that, concludes a diagnosis. There is no such thing as an objective test to determine a "mental illness." They are, in fact, made up.

    There has never been a single established fact of biological determinism in the case of 'mental disorder' or 'mental illness.' These are, in fact, made up terms, social constructs, that change through time and are governed by the biases of those who create them.

    Psychiatry has been operating for over 200 years on the basis that 'mental disorder' is caused by human biology, and while acknowledging that it has yet to be proven, they acted under the basis that it 'would' be proven. Over 200 years ago, psychiatrists would drain the blood from people's brains to 'release the disorder'... not so long ago we gave them lobotomies... today, we simply drug them. And because drugs are so profitable, and because (as Aldous Huxley explained) "social control" will reach its ultimate fruition through elites making people "love their servitude" (what he referred to as the "Ultimate Revolution"), the amount of "mental illness" classifications has skyrocketed, and the drugs to "treat" them followed suit.

    It's creating a world of zombies, where all human emotion and experience is considered "ill" or "abnormal", and thus there can (and will) be a drug for any situation, emotion, experience or thought, so that instead of actually "taking responsibility" for the world around us, instead of changing our environment, we change our psychological state in order to better suit ourselves to a monotonous existence.

    And you can claim "paranoia" or whatever it is I am sure you will claim, but several prominent intellectual voices were warning people about this as early as the 1930s, and specifically psychology, psychiatry and pharmacology were identified. It isn't 'conspiracy', but simply social control, social engineering, and long, incremental social processes.

    Psychology students today are not taught about different ways of viewing the mind or the world. It is presented as a "science", when in fact, it is a philosophy. They are not readily exposed to the critical thinkers within the field, who have done so much to advance knowledge about the mind, but because they were anti-establishment agitators, their work is often lost to history.

    Some good people to look up on the subject:
    - Franco Basaglia
    - Thomas Szasz
    - R.D. Laing
    - Michel Foucault
    - Jeffrey Masson
    - Rollo May
    - Robert Whitaker

    There is much more to the mind than biology. Do not be too hasty to label mental differentiation as "illness." Posterity will call you 'mad'.
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    Nov 18, 2010 6:42 AM GMT
    mnboy saidI could see it being classified as a type of OCD or another type of personality disorder but I don't know about a mental disorder.


    It could be a manifestation of a mental disorder, but to me it seeks akin to female's anorexia. So whatever that is classified under, this would probably be comparable.
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    Nov 18, 2010 6:42 AM GMT
    5ebastian saidIm just curious how these "doctors" are able to label something a personality disorder when its clearly nothing but. I suppose they would argue that extensive exercise is indicative of the mental state associated with mania in patients with bipolar disorder. Then again, I don't agree with their trivial basis.


    On that note, being preoccupied with "eating healthy" is also considered a "mental disorder."
    http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2009/aug/16/orthorexia-mental-health-eating-disorder

    It would all be so funny if the repercussions weren't so serious. Shame.
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    Nov 18, 2010 6:45 AM GMT
    MeOhMy said
    Do you know how something becomes a "mental illness"?
    The American Psychiatric Association (APA) takes a vote. That's all.


    They are experts in the field, and thus are rightfully in this position to decide what is a mental disorder. Anyway, I'm not freaking out because there wasn't a pizza man randomly elected to the APA like one was for congress this year.
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    Nov 18, 2010 6:46 AM GMT
    MeOhMy said
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidI have known men who "suffer" from this condition. Total narcissist bullshit and I do not get along with them at all.


    Yeah, Narcissus didn't die because he had a "mental disorder", he died because he was so self-absorbed, he wasted away while staring in his own reflection.


    And that's a mental disorder. We can argue what you think "mental" is, but his behavior was unequivocally detrimental to his physical well being.
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    Nov 18, 2010 6:47 AM GMT
    MeOhMy said
    5ebastian saidIm just curious how these "doctors" are able to label something a personality disorder when its clearly nothing but. I suppose they would argue that extensive exercise is indicative of the mental state associated with mania in patients with bipolar disorder. Then again, I don't agree with their trivial basis.


    On that note, being preoccupied with "eating healthy" is also considered a "mental disorder."
    http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2009/aug/16/orthorexia-mental-health-eating-disorder

    It would all be so funny if the repercussions weren't so serious. Shame.


    Ah, dude did you read that url? Again, obviously you glanced at it.
    Sorry but someone who tries to say that there an no such things as mental illnesses cannot be taken seriously.
    Also, ever heard of Narcissistic Personality Disorder... he did die of a disorder..
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    Nov 18, 2010 6:59 AM GMT
    mnboy said
    MeOhMy said
    5ebastian saidIm just curious how these "doctors" are able to label something a personality disorder when its clearly nothing but. I suppose they would argue that extensive exercise is indicative of the mental state associated with mania in patients with bipolar disorder. Then again, I don't agree with their trivial basis.


    On that note, being preoccupied with "eating healthy" is also considered a "mental disorder."
    http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2009/aug/16/orthorexia-mental-health-eating-disorder

    It would all be so funny if the repercussions weren't so serious. Shame.


    Ah, dude did you read that url? Again, obviously you glanced at it.
    Sorry but someone who tries to say that there an no such things as mental illnesses cannot be taken seriously.
    Also, ever heard of Narcissistic Personality Disorder... he did die of a disorder..


    Haha, you're funny. Well, I think someone who claims there are such things as "mental illnesses", yet provides no actual evidence for the claim, has little to be taken seriously. "Illness" is a medical term, and illnesses of the body are not simply 'symptoms', but are largely objective, identifiable, tested diagnoses which are based upon particular symptoms. There is no such test in matters of the mind. There is no such thing as 'normality' in matters of the mind. If it is up to psychologists and psychiatrists to decide what is 'normal' and 'abnormal', then we're all fucked.

    You base your understanding of "mental illness" on unsound methods. How is a group of flawed individuals (as all people are) voting to agree on the application the term "illness" to a particular set of criteria of symptoms in
    personality variants, in any way, proof of "mental illness"?

    One should study the history of psychiatry and the term "mental illness" if one hopes to be taken seriously on their views of "mental illness."

    As for Narcissus: what test was conducted on Narcissus to determine his 'illness' or 'disorder'? Oh wait, there's no such thing. So I get it, you take particular characteristics and personality variants, classify them as 'symptoms', and deduce from that simple formula, the classification of 'illness'. Well, take the symptoms of NPD, look at them, and if you can look at a list of symptoms and say it is "proof" of "illness", there is nothing scientific or medical or objective about that perspective. NPD is otherwise known as being a self-absorbed ass. All that it takes to "prove" that it is a mental illness is for a bunch of guys sitting in a room to vote that it is.

    And apparently, all it takes for you to believe them and have blind faith in their 'votes' is repetition. You know, you should check the DSM-IV under "faith", I'm sure it's classified as a "mental illness" too... you should get that checked out.
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    Nov 18, 2010 7:04 AM GMT
    5ebastian saidUr right I did glance at the article, and then I responded.

    ---


    "I could see it being classified as a type of OCD or another type of personality disorder but I don't know about a mental disorder."

    That is what you said. I was pointing out that even if that were true... a personality disorder such as Borderline Personality Disorder differs from Bipolar Disorder (which has been associated with patients that exercise rigorously).

    You clinical definitions are off. What does frequent gym use have to do with a personality disorder? Is showering every frickin day considered a personality disorder? People go to the gym to tone up and yes build muscle. There's nothing wrong with it.


    The problem is frequent gym usage. The problem is when it becomes too much. Don't act like you don't know what the article is talking about. Those people who take the gym too far.
    http://www.strangesports.com/images/content/112336.jpg

    It could be seen as OCD because of the obsessiveness of it or a personality disorder such as seen in people with addictions or anorexia (hence its name).
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    Nov 18, 2010 7:05 AM GMT
    JAKEBENSON said
    MeOhMy said
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidI have known men who "suffer" from this condition. Total narcissist bullshit and I do not get along with them at all.


    Yeah, Narcissus didn't die because he had a "mental disorder", he died because he was so self-absorbed, he wasted away while staring in his own reflection.


    And that's a mental disorder. We can argue what you think "mental" is, but his behavior was unequivocally detrimental to his physical well being.


    So therefore... the 'cause' is physical?

    It's a dangerous thing to mix 'cause' and 'effect'.

    If a mental state is detrimental to one's well being, as indeed MANY are, it is the responsibility of that person to change that, and hopefully the prerogative of those close to that person to help. Classifying it as an "illness" removes the notion of 'responsibility' for both the individual and society.

    I subscribe to the notion that "insanity is a sane reaction to an insane society." (R.D. Laing)

    However, classifying mental differences as "disorders" and "illnesses" is much safer for power structures (social, political, economic, cultural, etc) than having communities of people seeking to change the environment to suit the mind. So instead, they propose drugging the mind to suit the environment. If your mind rebels against this world we call 'reality', you are called "ill" and can thus be drugged up. That is where the term "illness" becomes so useful, it sounds medical and scientific, as if it has legitimacy when it has anything but.

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    Nov 18, 2010 7:06 AM GMT
    Honest question... how is "bigorexia" different from "manorexia"?
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    Nov 18, 2010 7:09 AM GMT
    SAHEM62896 saidHonest question... how is "bigorexia" different from "manorexia"?


    Manorexia is the same thing as anorexia just people didn't think anorexia was 'masculine' enough for men...
    Wrestlers have manorexia.
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    Nov 18, 2010 7:11 AM GMT
    JAKEBENSON said
    MeOhMy said
    Do you know how something becomes a "mental illness"?
    The American Psychiatric Association (APA) takes a vote. That's all.


    They are experts in the field, and thus are rightfully in this position to decide what is a mental disorder. Anyway, I'm not freaking out because there wasn't a pizza man randomly elected to the APA like one was for congress this year.


    Experts in what? Voting?

    Psychiatry is a philosophy disguised as a science, and has the backing of the state, which provides it with legitimacy.

    Religion has been a philosophy of the world, often backed by the state, which provides it with legitimacy (and the church returns the favour). Does that mean that the religious members of a particular church or religion are "experts" on the world?

    Certainly, they can be considered the champions of their faith, the "experts" in their philosophy.

    Man kind was good to question the legitimacy of the church and the views of its leaders. Man kind would do well to treat psychiatry and psychology the same. Just because it is "viewed" as legitimate, does not make it so.

  • Vaughn

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    Nov 18, 2010 8:12 AM GMT
    averagejoe saidI just hope the don't seriously name it that.

    Seems more of a subtle form of body dysmorphic disorder to me.


    Too late. Been done already. REAL cases though people actually look into the mirror and see themselves as thinner than they actually are. It is NOT a personality disorder but a perceptual disorder. I'm in this class right now.
  • Vaughn

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    Nov 18, 2010 8:23 AM GMT
    MeOhMy saidyeah, everything is a mental disorder or "illness."

    "Mental illness" is a social construct, to label, classify and 'treat' that which we do not understand about the mind.

    Do you know how something becomes a "mental illness"?
    The American Psychiatric Association (APA) takes a vote. That's all.

    The APA are also heavily connected to the pharmaceutical industry, which means that the more "illnesses" they literally make up, the more drugs that can be made to "treat" them.

    Homosexuality was considered a "mental illness" until the 1970s, when the APA voted to have it removed.

    So yes, I'm sure it WILL become a "mental disorder", just like all the other personality variants and psychological differences in the whole spectrum of human emotion and experience.


    It's only a mental illness if it interferes with your ability to function or attain "happiness". People often lie about the extent of the problem when they seek the help of a mental health professional. How many people claim to have OCD or Narcissism when in fact they are embellishing mild to weak cases of the problem. The APA also took a stance against conversion therapy whilst the government still allows people to lock their kids up in mercy houses. In the 1970s the APA was ahead of it's time. The APA isn't as much attached to the pharmaceutical companies as much as individual doctors are. Bigorexia is not news. It will be generally diagnosed less often as it has different effects on the body then anorexia. Most things have been "coined" by shrinks, especially in Normal Psychology.
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    Nov 18, 2010 8:54 AM GMT
    There's too much money in making up ways to be sick in the mind to stop, we should congratulate the APA on achieving a money garnering status that has even more potential than religion. After all, you can only create so many ways to sin but with mental disorders, the possibilities are endless. We shouldn't be hating on the APA for their ridiculously effective method of getting paid.