Does it get harder to progress?

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    Nov 21, 2010 12:58 AM GMT
    Would you agree that, on the road to fitness in whatever endeavor, be it running, cycling, sports, bodybuilding, fat loss, etc., it gets harder and harder as you continue with it?

    I personally think it does. For me, I've been trying to lose weight and cut fat. I've watched what I eat and done more walking/jogging/running than I've ever done in my life, and I've lost around 45 - 50 pounds from late March to now, so now I'm down to a little less than 180. And I look better, and I feel better, and I get a lot of compliments and stuff from people about it. But I'm still not where I want to be. I still feel like I'm not there yet. And I'm beginning to worry that it's the ever dreaded "plateau" that so many exercise enthusiasts/experts warn about. If it's not physically the case, it feels mental. Like you're mentally exhausted from trying to motivate yourself to keep to your program. Furthermore, if there's one thing that worries me more than plateau-ing, it's backtracking. It always sucks to see that you are going the opposite direction of where you want to go, like if you gain some weight instead of losing it, or if you fall off the wagon with your eating routine.

    On my journey, I've had to do it all on my own. I never ran with a friend or anyone. Maybe it's just the solitude of the journey that's catching up to me. icon_neutral.gif
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    Nov 21, 2010 2:20 AM GMT
    Szchatt89 saidMaybe it's just the solitude of the journey that's catching up to me. icon_neutral.gif

    ...or biology.
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    Nov 21, 2010 3:26 AM GMT
    What makes you think you are on a plateau? You don't really say why you think that.

    I am on the other end of the spectrum myself. I can lose weight just by breathing. Most people say they are jealous of that but realistically it is the same problem just in reverse.

    Before I get more off topic let me just say that: No, it does not get harder. It only gets harder if you stop or relax your fitness behavior. That being said there is no problem in taking a break as long as you get back to it at some point. Take a couple of days to a week off from exercising. Not dieting though.

    I also have never really worked out with anyone aside from personal trainers years ago. It can be tough being the one and the only one that supports you and gets you to the gym. And yeah, backtracking completely sucks.
  • barriehomeboy

    Posts: 2475

    Nov 21, 2010 3:32 AM GMT
    I'm not an expert but..wait a minute... I'm gay and on the internet so that makes me an expert on everything!... From what I've read, fitness progress comes fast when you start working out, then the gains are slower as you get more muscular. If that wasn't so, we'd all look like Mark Wahlberg when he was Marky Mark. Makes sense, no?
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    Nov 21, 2010 4:26 AM GMT
    "Beginner's gains" and "diminishing returns" come to mind.
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    Nov 21, 2010 5:51 AM GMT
    And after some years, you reach Alice in Wonderland wisdom :

    Need to run very fast to stay on the same spot
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    Nov 21, 2010 3:14 PM GMT
    minox saidAnd after some years, you reach Alice in Wonderland wisdom :

    Need to run very fast to stay on the same spot
    That's treadmill wisdom.
    When I run faster, I get to point B faster.
    <-- Not a treadmill fan. icon_wink.gif
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    Nov 21, 2010 4:37 PM GMT
    there are two ways of looking at it:

    (1) you make fast gains to start with which tail off and the last part of the journey gets harder and harder, with more and more work for less and less gain.

    (2) you work hard to get where you want to be and then maintain, which is easier than gaining.

    Depends on how realistic you are about where you want to be. Me, I prefer to get to 85 or 90% of my potential and be happy (option 2). Some people get caught in the destructive goal for perfection (1). For elite athletes it´s necessary. For the rest of us just another sort of self harm.
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    Nov 21, 2010 4:46 PM GMT
    i find it easier once you get into it, you get more experienced and know what youre doing. thats how i see it
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    Nov 21, 2010 5:07 PM GMT
    If things stay the same, they will stay the same.

    You have to increase calories, train differently, etc, and make sure not to over train, in order to continue to make gains.

    You fail to define where you "want to be." You need a clearly defined plan, and then you need to execute it.