My lower lower back hurts!

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    Nov 30, 2010 4:29 AM GMT
    I've tried the chiropractor who straightened me out and a muscle-bone doctor who injected cortisone in my lower back muscle and gave me ibuprofen.

    The thing is I've been doing all these back stretches and glute and legs stetches, but the pain is still there! It's a dull ache that feels like it's on the anterior end of the lowest part of my spine, like where the spine connects to my hips. It feels like it's somewhere deep inside between my glutes and my spine. I have NO IDEA what the hell this is but it's been going on for months.

    Maybe someone can shed light on this since I'm tired of paying doctors to not fix my back. =( ....and yes I know a chiropractor is not a "doctor" ...but they usually fix my back.

    [edit] I know the etiology of this pain, which may be important in diagnosing the source of the problem. I was doing this exercise:



    NOT with the leg machine but with the appropriate machine for lower back lifts. Sorry this video is like the worst but the only one I could find right now to illustrate my point. Anyway I went down with my arms out and up and OW totally hurt.
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    Nov 30, 2010 5:57 AM GMT
    SI (sacroiliac) joint pain?

    Google it and try some of the exercises suggested in the online videos.
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    Nov 30, 2010 6:09 AM GMT
    mine too. only more towards the center lower back by the spinal cord. mine are knots though cause i can feel them. Massage i think is the only way to get rid of them. all my stress builds up on my back.
  • Citrushills

    Posts: 56

    Nov 30, 2010 6:17 AM GMT
    I've got multiple problems with my spine and have had what you describe. I found that physical therapy was extremely helpful. I've found that the worst thing is rest, especially bed rest. I recommend the following:

    Try race-walking several miles daily and paying attention to correct posture as you do so.

    Lift only light weights with strict attention to posture--keeping your back straight. If you have pain on lifting, stop and lighten up on weight until you can do so without pain and if the pain persists on lifting, proceed to a different weight-lifting exercise.

    Work on strengthening your hips by doing straight leg raises. You can start these leg raises without any weight but as you get more comfortable, gradually add weights on the ankles in half pound increments. Ankle weights are available at most sporting good stores.

    Work on strengthening your pelvis by doing pelvic tilt exercises.

    Stretches--
    Hang from a bar for 10-20 seconds gradually increasing to 20-30 seconds.
    Hamstring/s.
    Illial tibial band (IT band).
    Hip flexer.
    Knees to chest for lower back.
    Do bridges.

    Finally, apply heat for 15-20 minutes prior to exercise and ice at first 15-20 minutes after all exercise and stretching is completed. When you are feeling better, use heat both prior to and after exercise. For most, wet heat works better but dry heat can be effective as well.

    I hope this was helpful.
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    Nov 30, 2010 6:30 AM GMT
    Jake I think you may have strained your Psoas muscle ( it's one of your main hip flexor muscles) it's also the most overlooked muscle involved in low back pain cause people think its not a cause due to the fact that it is on the anterior surface of your body. I've treated the psoas muscle on many patients with ongoing low back pain described the same way you have and it has been very successful in eliminating the pain. So find a physiotherapist or Chiropractor that specializes in the a soft tissue therapy called ART ( Active Release Technique.)

    go to www.activerelease.com and click on find a provider its a database that allows you to find practioners in your area that specialize in ART. Good luck dude. Seriously check it out. icon_smile.gif
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    Nov 30, 2010 7:27 AM GMT
    Um- Stop power bottoming- I'm sure that'll stop the "somewhere deep inside between my glutes and my spine" pain.





    I don't know if you're being serious of not.
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    Nov 30, 2010 7:58 AM GMT
    Citrushills saidI've got multiple problems with my spine and have had what you describe. I found that physical therapy was extremely helpful. I've found that the worst thing is rest, especially bed rest. I recommend the following:

    Try race-walking several miles daily and paying attention to correct posture as you do so.

    Lift only light weights with strict attention to posture--keeping your back straight. If you have pain on lifting, stop and lighten up on weight until you can do so without pain and if the pain persists on lifting, proceed to a different weight-lifting exercise.

    Work on strengthening your hips by doing straight leg raises. You can start these leg raises without any weight but as you get more comfortable, gradually add weights on the ankles in half pound increments. Ankle weights are available at most sporting good stores.

    Work on strengthening your pelvis by doing pelvic tilt exercises.

    Stretches--
    Hang from a bar for 10-20 seconds gradually increasing to 20-30 seconds.
    Hamstring/s.
    Illial tibial band (IT band).
    Hip flexer.
    Knees to chest for lower back.
    Do bridges.

    Finally, apply heat for 15-20 minutes prior to exercise and ice at first 15-20 minutes after all exercise and stretching is completed. When you are feeling better, use heat both prior to and after exercise. For most, wet heat works better but dry heat can be effective as well.

    I hope this was helpful.


    Definitely awesome that we are trying to help, but keep in mind we don't know the actual cause of his pain. Some of the exercises you suggest can actually exacerbate his pain
  • Bunjamon

    Posts: 3161

    Nov 30, 2010 11:01 AM GMT
    My mom, who is still very young and fit, had crippling back pain until she did spinal traction. Get a referral to see a physical therapist.

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    Nov 30, 2010 12:16 PM GMT
    I've had pain like that, though it's been on and off since I was a teenager. I kind of just deal with it, but I might see a physical therapist if it's really hurting you. Also, try focusing more on lower back exercises to strengthen the area. That's probably what a therapist would end up having you do anyway. No hardcore deadlifts or anything though, obviously!
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    Nov 30, 2010 12:21 PM GMT
    Have you tried stretching your hip flexors?
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    Nov 30, 2010 2:45 PM GMT
    If the cortisone injections and stretches didn't help, you probably need an MRI. MRI would be the next step.
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    Nov 30, 2010 3:43 PM GMT
    Well, I'm biased but it sounds like a massage therapist is the answer. It sounds like a muscular issue. Doctors are only going to give you shots and pills to mask the problem and a chiropractor isn't going to be able to fix a muscular problem(which is what your problem sounds like) like a massage therapist can. That's why many chiropractors have massage therapists working for them. Have you not considered a massage therapist?
  • tokugawa

    Posts: 945

    Nov 30, 2010 4:44 PM GMT
    Take a break from weight lifting and any exercise which uses your lower back muscles. I had something like what you describe, and after about a month away from the gym, the pain went away.
  • Citrushills

    Posts: 56

    Nov 30, 2010 5:05 PM GMT
    I definitely said that if you have pain when doing these things, stop, or try another exercise, move onto the next step. Relieving back pain can take weeks and sometimes months. It took me 4 months with mine when I had it two years ago. But I have NEVER heard of ANYONE getting sustained or permanent relief from the medical solutions--epidural injections or surgery. Everybody has told me that their pain has returned so I think it's better for many to take a pass on surgery and find out how to manage their spine through stretching and exercise done properly. There is some trial and error involved but physical therapy is extremely helpful.

    orthojock said
    Citrushills saidI've got multiple problems with my spine and have had what you describe. I found that physical therapy was extremely helpful. I've found that the worst thing is rest, especially bed rest. I recommend the following:

    Try race-walking several miles daily and paying attention to correct posture as you do so.

    Lift only light weights with strict attention to posture--keeping your back straight. If you have pain on lifting, stop and lighten up on weight until you can do so without pain and if the pain persists on lifting, proceed to a different weight-lifting exercise.

    Work on strengthening your hips by doing straight leg raises. You can start these leg raises without any weight but as you get more comfortable, gradually add weights on the ankles in half pound increments. Ankle weights are available at most sporting good stores.

    Work on strengthening your pelvis by doing pelvic tilt exercises.

    Stretches--
    Hang from a bar for 10-20 seconds gradually increasing to 20-30 seconds.
    Hamstring/s.
    Illial tibial band (IT band).
    Hip flexer.
    Knees to chest for lower back.
    Do bridges.

    Finally, apply heat for 15-20 minutes prior to exercise and ice at first 15-20 minutes after all exercise and stretching is completed. When you are feeling better, use heat both prior to and after exercise. For most, wet heat works better but dry heat can be effective as well.

    I hope this was helpful.


    Definitely awesome that we are trying to help, but keep in mind we don't know the actual cause of his pain. Some of the exercises you suggest can actually exacerbate his pain
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    Nov 30, 2010 5:06 PM GMT
    tokugawa saidTake a break from weight lifting and any exercise which uses your lower back muscles. I had something like what you describe, and after about a month away from the gym, the pain went away.
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Good point !!! I've had multiple spinal troubles bulging disks, deteriorating disk desease (loss of spinal fluid from damage), surgery in my cervical spine with screws and a plate of steel installed, sciatica and nerve damage to all extremities. Changing what I'm doing frequently is a lifesaver for me, Avoid those exercizes that affect your lower back, everytime you sit down or lay down, have a heat pad to help relax those muscles, massage the area often yourself and use a vibratoror, muslces being relaxed is primary to relieving your pain. Don't stop doing all the above untill your feeling better then if signs of the same problem happen again note what activity brings it on and stop it. LOL !! you can get relief but you have to pay attention to what your body is telling you. Good luck
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    Nov 30, 2010 5:50 PM GMT
    crazycool saidJake I think you may have strained your Psoas muscle


    Thanks for the lead on this...I think this could be a/the culprit. That's definitely the area of the pain I feel. It's either that or the Piriformis muscle.
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    Nov 30, 2010 5:52 PM GMT
    uhhuh saidHave you tried stretching your hip flexors?


    Could you or someone provide me with a bunch of stretches? I've looked and I know a few, but I'm looking for some more.
  • metta

    Posts: 39104

    Nov 30, 2010 6:55 PM GMT
    13 years ago, I injured my lower back from doing squats improperly. I took ibuprofen and lots of rest. I found that once I injured it, it was easy to re-injure it. Over the years, I have always been very careful in doing things to make sure that I do not injure it again. If I start to feel something after doing some strenuous back work, I take ibuprofen right away....usually around 400 to 600 mg. Taking a big dose once, I normally only need to take one dose and it goes away. This should not be done on a long term basis of course. I probably only take the ibuprofen, on average, once every couple of months. I look at it as proper pain management. I would say that in the last 5 years, after working out regularly, my back is almost normal. It can get a little sore after working on my back muscles or during cold weather but I have not had my back go out in at least 10 years. I'm still very careful, even now, when doing any squats, I use lite weight. I find that I do not need a lot of weight to get a good leg workout. I did not do any squats for many years after I injured it.

    If you are doing something that you feel is putting too much stress on the injured area of your back, stop doing it. Listen to your body. It will generally tell you what you can and cannot do.

    To this day, it makes me cringe when I see people bouncing the weight on their shoulders, hoping up and down, when doing squats. (That is not what I did. I was just at a bad angle with too much weight/pressure on my lower back.)

    Something else that I found helpful, is when I'm sleeping, I use a body pillow and put it between my legs. It helps to keep the pressure off my back.

    I thought that it was the nerves that get inflamed.

    Don't do this...



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    Nov 30, 2010 8:17 PM GMT
    Take a HOT shower!
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    Nov 30, 2010 8:37 PM GMT
    Piriformis- can be released by rolling on a lacrosse ball...that's how I released mine a few years back. As far as stretching goes, try this...

    Lie down on a mat flat on your back, cross your legs, and bring them towards your chest. Start gently. I think the pose is called half pigeon if you want to look it up on a yoga site...maybe it's full pigeon. Someone correct me if I'm wrong.

    Things like cortisone, and chiropractic all have their place, but if the cause of the problem is a tight muscle, it makes sense to someone who specializes in treating muscles. I'm also studying to do neuromuscular/massage therapy... when I strained my hip flexors 2 years ago, and having someone get in there to release my psoas was the only thing that really helped. After that a yoga friend of mine showed me the dragon series which is a series of yoga poses done in a kneeling lunge stance.

    Tightness in hamstrings, and abdominals can also be a culprit in lower back pain.

    When you stretch do not bounce, if you bounce you're going too deep and you need to back off. Also make sure you are holding your stretches for an extended period of time focusing more on relaxing into the stretch than making the stretch too intense. That's where a lot of issues from static stretching come from, people go to deeply and activate the reflexive response that causes the muscle to do the opposite of what you want it to do.

    Hope that helps.
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    Nov 30, 2010 8:54 PM GMT
    I have had the same problem since I hurt it about 4 months ago. Recently while stretching Hamstrings, something pulled a muscle in my lower back and the pain came back.
    For me the heat patches help a lot. I use them every night and usually by third night pain goes away.
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    Nov 30, 2010 9:33 PM GMT
    Sounds like soreness from over-training, but I'd still suggest an MRI if the condition worsens.