Deadlift Replacement

  • Peteyboy583

    Posts: 32

    Dec 02, 2010 4:19 AM GMT
    Hey guys,

    I do deadlifts as a part of my workout, but I hurt my back about a month ago (just a slightly pulled muscle) and I don't want to possibly strain it again by doing deadlifts. Is there a decent substitute?
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    Dec 02, 2010 6:06 AM GMT
    I def can't think of any. I mean, any back work (i.e. any replacement exercise) you do is going to put strain on your back either way, so I'd not worry too much about it and just start back up really light? May be horrible advice but that's what I would do... nothin' beats deadlifts...
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    Dec 02, 2010 8:19 AM GMT
    Try http://www.realjock.com/article/473 maybe? Unless you're doing Russian Deadlifts that also use legs
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    Dec 02, 2010 8:59 AM GMT
    Peteyboy583 saidHey guys,

    I do deadlifts as a part of my workout, but I hurt my back about a month ago (just a slightly pulled muscle) and I don't want to possibly strain it again by doing deadlifts. Is there a decent substitute?



    deadlifts are a good work out if done correctly. I seriously injured my lower back once because i didnt use proper form. injured to the point that merely walkin was painful. the other think that SUCKS is i had missed on on dance-auditions for Step Up 2 the movie. i was depressed!
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    Dec 02, 2010 3:40 PM GMT
    To target the lower back, a low back machine or hyperextensions. But as MuchMoreThanMuscle suggests, I wouldn't try these either until you feel that your low back has completely healed, though I would start out with these before resuming deadlifts.
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    Dec 02, 2010 3:55 PM GMT
    If your back muscle is already healed (and you are certain it was teared muscle and not lower back disk pitching), do deadlift again.

    Just reduce the weight significantly (like 60% of what you used previously).

    As you are very slim/tall and still young, it's reasonable to assume your lower back muscle power are not on par with your legs power.

    Deadlift is a compound exercise, it require the simultaneous use of a chain of muscles. If one muscle group on the chain is weaker, it may fail and lead to injuries, out of losing the right form and also just out or tearing up.

    To reach that homogeneous power on all the muscular chain, you have to use weight targeted for the weak link, even if the exercise then feel ridiculously easy.

    For health purpose on the long run, you need to train so that your abs and lower back power outmatch your legs power. Specially for tall guys

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    Dec 02, 2010 3:56 PM GMT
    Cut out deadlifts and do squats instead. Deadlifts are a serious back injury just waiting to happen.
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    Dec 02, 2010 4:10 PM GMT
    catfish5 saidCut out deadlifts and do squats instead. Deadlifts are a serious back injury just waiting to happen.


    That's why I prefer full squat, even if it take a lof of work to get the form right (not trivial at all).

    DeadLift
    Half squat (femur parallel to the ground)
    Full squat (ass touching heels)
    Full squat holding in front of you, on shoulders and throat

    To get the same intensity, it's take a lot more weight from dead lift to full squat.

    For anything related to lower back vertebral disk pinch, the pressure on them is proportional to the weight on your shoulder, so dead lift dangerous just out of the weight.

    But it's very challenging to keep a perfect vertebra alignment in full squats, so full squat are dangerous out of quality of execution.

    Half squat is a compromise, significantly heavier weight than full squat, but less complicated to get the right form.

    Choose you own evil ;-)

    PS : Leg press is not in the league, it's not a compound exercise.
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    Dec 02, 2010 4:15 PM GMT
    Half squat is best. Full squat is a meniscal tear in your knee just waiting to happen.
  • DanOmatic

    Posts: 1155

    Dec 02, 2010 4:23 PM GMT
    I had a similar thing happen to me about a week ago: I was doing deadlifts with not a whole lot of weight and was being very conscious about my form (my trainer says I have great form), but nonetheless I ended up with a muscle strain/pull that has kept me from working out for a week and will mean having to pull out of a trail race on Saturday. It totally sucks!

    However, deadlifts themselves are great, and I will do them again when my back is better. I don't think my strained/pulled muscle came from the deadlifts per se, but the deadlifts were definitely a catalyst. I woke up the morning of my injury feeling a bit tight in my back from a hard trail race the weekend before--I should have known not to tempt fate by doing a back workout later that day. That's what did me in, but it wasn't the cause of my injury.
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    Dec 02, 2010 4:48 PM GMT
    catfish5 saidHalf squat is best. Full squat is a meniscal tear in your knee just waiting to happen.


    I hear you ;-)

    But at my age, I trust my form more than my aging body, as vertebral disk don't regenerate, and get weaker as years fly.

    This being said, I did learn the form before you where born (yep, at 10yo), refused to start doing squat with real heavy weight, despite coaches pressure, before I completely stopped to grow and got full bone calcification, and got very strong abs./lower back muscle (21yo).
    At 48, despite pole vaulting and triple jumping on national level, and regulary doing full squats, it still have all my meniscs and healthy lower back.

    The form, and the choice of the right weight, really matter on the long run.

    Most my buddies got menisc surgery or L4/L5 disk removal before being 30yo, but, during training, they were choosing maximum risk options to get maximal short term power benefit.