Follow reason or feelings?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 03, 2010 1:18 AM GMT
    I think this may be Like an earlier post about reason vs feelings,(I actually was slightly weirded out by the similarities of the other post) but I still wnt my own post and perspectives. So my situation is that I am in nursing school and I am panicking that I don't want to be a nurse anymore. I have done a lot of soul searching the past year and had to be out of school for a semester etc... I have an idea of a business I would like to start. Its quite brilliant if i must say so myself. I have everything fine tuned and I consider it my baby and wish to pursue starting it. I've just recently told my mother I had this plan and while she was supportive she was unsure of what to say. Not that I blame her it kind of came out of left field. So I have to ask- what, personally, would you do: follow reason and job security or something You basically live and dream about
  • gonewind

    Posts: 37

    Dec 03, 2010 1:31 AM GMT
    Moderation. Find a middle ground between what is reasonable and what is desirable. Personally I would err to the side of feelings because in the long run, you want to wake up and be happy that you're going to work. If you love it, you love it and no matter how much instability you may experience monetarily, you are pursuing your dreams and that should grant you the ultimate happiness.

    But pragmatically, looking at the economy, its not the right environment for people to jump off the high board and hope there's water below. So find a way to mix the two. icon_biggrin.gif
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    Dec 03, 2010 1:47 AM GMT
    Why not finish your schooling, take your degree, and then start your business? If the business thrives, the credential may still be useful. If the business doesn't thrive, then you have a fallback job to tide you over until you come up with entrepreneurial Plan B.
  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16311

    Dec 03, 2010 1:49 AM GMT
    I'd probably complete the degree and evaluate whether I could do both.. nursing AND your business and if you felt your new venture needed your full time attention, you'd still have your nursing degree to fall back on if the new business didn't work out.
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    Dec 03, 2010 1:50 AM GMT
    When giving any advice or an opininon, one must stick to this concept: LESS is More. So, what is my advice? Reason over feelings ALL the time. Think with your BIG head and not with the little one. Good luck.
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    Dec 03, 2010 1:53 AM GMT
    As someone who went through a version of this with grad school, I'd say to definitely have some sort of safety net to break your fall. I was working toward a master's of science in California, and then came to the conclusion that 1.) I wasn't too sure if I was still interested in the program, and 2.) It was costing me waaaaay too much. So my plan was to leave the school and go get some job experience....

    ...skip ahead almost a year where I'm still looking for a full-time job and working two different part-time jobs. While I'm still sure I made the right decision to leave the program, it probably would've been smart to explore all of my options (say, try to get a co-op and think about continuing school later).

    If you've thought it through a million plus times, then follow your feelings - but, as gonewind mentioned, the economy isn't particularly forgiving at the moment, so plan out a few ways to support yourself before you take the jump.
  • barriehomeboy

    Posts: 2475

    Dec 03, 2010 1:58 AM GMT
    What is it about nursing that you don't like? If you like going home at night feeling fulfilled because you helped sick people get better, but don't like changing diapers, then you should look around the hospital at the other careers. Respiratory Technologists save lives and are paged overhead STAT! all the time. If you like drama, you'd like being an RT!

    If you like toys and people, become an X-Ray Tech. We have robots to position the machines, and digital networks and post processing computers to play with. CT is the best. The 3-D images we produce are nothing like the things you have to wear glasses to see in the theater.

    Stay with health-care my friend. Business is dead. The global debt meltdown is coming. Those rich fat cats will need someone to keep them alive when they have their heart-attacks, or are still alive after they bounce off an awning after jumping out of a building.

    You followed your heart and soul when you picked health-care. Stick with it.
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    Dec 03, 2010 2:05 AM GMT
    The Seven Pitfalls of Business Failure
    by Patricia Schaefer

    Summary: When you're starting a new business, the last thing you want to focus on is failure. But if you address the common reasons for failure up front, you'll be much less likely to fall victim to them yourself. Here are the top 7 reasons why businesses fail and tips for avoiding them

    The latest statistics from the Small Business Administration (SBA) show that "two-thirds of new employer establishments survive at lease two years, and 44 percent survive at least four years." This is a far cry from the previous long-held belief that 50 percent of businesses fail in the first year and 95 percent fail within five years.

    Brian Head, Economist with the SBA Office of Advocacy, noted that the latest statistics are a much more accurate assessment of new business success rates, and that "as a general rule of thumb, new employer businesses have a 50/50 chance of surviving for five years or more."

    Better success rates notwithstanding, a significant percentage of new businesses do fail. Expert opinions abound about what a business owner should and shouldn't do to keep a new business afloat in the perilous waters of the entrepreneurial sea. There are, however, key factors that -- if not avoided -- will be certain to weigh down a business and possibly sink it forevermore.

    1. You start your business for the wrong reasons.
    2. Poor Management
    3. Insufficient Capital
    4. Location, Location, Location
    5. Lack of Planning
    6. Overexpansion
    7. No Website

    Read the article: http://www.businessknowhow.com/startup/business-failure.htm
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 03, 2010 2:23 AM GMT
    Finish school first. You can always do something outside of nursing later. But you can't always go back and finish your degree. In addition, you'll have something to fall back in case your other ideas don't work out. Good luck.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 03, 2010 2:25 AM GMT
    Caslon16000 saidThe Seven Pitfalls of Business Failure
    by Patricia Schaefer

    Summary: When you're starting a new business, the last thing you want to focus on is failure. But if you address the common reasons for failure up front, you'll be much less likely to fall victim to them yourself. Here are the top 7 reasons why businesses fail and tips for avoiding them

    The latest statistics from the Small Business Administration (SBA) show that "two-thirds of new employer establishments survive at lease two years, and 44 percent survive at least four years." This is a far cry from the previous long-held belief that 50 percent of businesses fail in the first year and 95 percent fail within five years.

    Brian Head, Economist with the SBA Office of Advocacy, noted that the latest statistics are a much more accurate assessment of new business success rates, and that "as a general rule of thumb, new employer businesses have a 50/50 chance of surviving for five years or more."

    Better success rates notwithstanding, a significant percentage of new businesses do fail. Expert opinions abound about what a business owner should and shouldn't do to keep a new business afloat in the perilous waters of the entrepreneurial sea. There are, however, key factors that -- if not avoided -- will be certain to weigh down a business and possibly sink it forevermore.

    1. You start your business for the wrong reasons.
    2. Poor Management
    3. Insufficient Capital
    4. Location, Location, Location
    5. Lack of Planning
    6. Overexpansion
    7. No Website

    Read the article: http://www.businessknowhow.com/startup/business-failure.htm


    Good post. But you forgot one. The #1 reason small businesses fail is because the OWNER doesn't show up for work.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 03, 2010 3:12 AM GMT
    Go for it.

    But under one condition.... you put your heart and soul into it. Balls to the wall. No slacking. Give it your all.

    Go in with the understanding that things never turn out the way that you planned... for better or worse

    You only have one life man, you might as well live it to its fullest. If it fails.... who cares? Go back and finish school. But until then, follow your heart. It'll lead you to amazing places.