Dead aboriginal woman sarrested for introxication suffers massive stroke in police custody - 6 hours pass before officers summon paramedics

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    Dec 14, 2010 1:41 AM GMT
    http://www.cbc.ca/canada/nova-scotia/story/2010/12/13/ns-report-on-prisoners-death.html?ref=rss&loomia_si=t0:a16:g4:r4:c0:b0#socialcomments


    Sadly this is just the most recent incident.


    Stroke symptoms can look like drunk behaviour.


    Know these symptoms :

    Symptoms of stroke can include (but are not limited to) slurring, difficulty understanding or speaking, unsteadiness, blurred or double vision, dilated pupils
    weakness or numbness on one side.

    All of these are also signs of intoxication


    If you suspect someone is having a stroke cal 911 without delay

    A simple test: ask them to stick out their tongue - when someone is having a stroke, the tongue will not be straight - it will point to one side or another.

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    Dec 14, 2010 1:46 AM GMT
    Maybe all the policemen were at taser practice.
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    Dec 14, 2010 2:00 AM GMT
    As you might well imagine, this story hits close to home for me.

    I have also had the experience of a "special constable" try to arrest me for public intoxication when I had a seizure. He insisted I could not be having a seizure because i was not unconcious. icon_rolleyes.gif

    (I have only lost consciousness once during a grand mal seizure - I do not lose consciousness each time.

    (I have been painfully concious during a couple and it was horrible and terrifying for my boyfriend who witnessed it.


    ( I "saw" the "warning colours" (very pretty kaleidoscopic colours in my lerft peripheral vision - called out "Alllan - I need you - NOW" and got onto the floor just as the violent twitching began. Tht. He called my ex-wife (who lived down the block) and she was there in about 3 minutes - I was convulsing the entire time - but totally conscious and able to speak (but I may not have been making a whole lot of sense)

    My ex-wife got there and she just talked calmly to me until it stopped. Then they put me to bed for 12 hours unbroken sleep.
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    Dec 14, 2010 3:32 AM GMT
    I saw you have a seizure once. It was weird. I called your son. Remember? You were down in the basement at the time.
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    Dec 14, 2010 3:33 AM GMT
    The title of this thread makes me wanna fuckin nuke the whole planet...

    yes, Im enraged
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    Dec 14, 2010 3:37 AM GMT
    amar_m saidThe title of this thread makes me wanna fuckin nuke the whole planet...

    yes, Im enraged


    Uhm.. I still like my life thank you. And i hope i have a lot left to experience so please no nuking if said planet.. just nuke the officers involved thx icon_smile.gif
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    Dec 14, 2010 4:39 AM GMT
    Read the comment from the ER Doctor, the stroke would not have been noticed in hospital because the individual was drunk. The only indicators would have been after she sobered up.

    Sad that a life was lost, but no culpability on the Police's part.
  • conquer

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    Dec 14, 2010 6:07 AM GMT
    shameful, one more incident to tarnish the rcmp's cred's
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    Dec 14, 2010 6:07 AM GMT
    I wish this were an isolated incident, but I remember a similar case (also involving a seriously ill aboriginal Australian) being discussed at a 2001 Indigenous Knowledges Conference. The exact same thing happened here in southern Indiana three months ago, only the stroke victim (police victim?) was a 24-year-old white woman. Sadly, she left a two-year-old daughter behind. In the southern Indiana case, however, the police were already under investigation for 20+ allegations of torture over the previous year, so it proved to be the last straw.
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    Dec 14, 2010 4:01 PM GMT
    conquer saidshameful, one more incident to tarnish the rcmp's cred's



    Is the Truro police force RCMP?

    http://www.truro.ca/police-services.html


    -Doug
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    Dec 14, 2010 4:09 PM GMT
    Correct me if I'm wrong aren't Aboriginees considered to be and treated like third class tribal residents in that Country???? This comes as no surprise to me, it's horrible but not a shock. It's not like here in the US that we don't have a history of that happening come now!
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    Dec 14, 2010 4:15 PM GMT
    From your headline:

    A dead aboriginal woman was arrested for being intoxicated. And that dead aboriginal woman somehow suffered a massive stroke and died again.

    What?
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    Dec 14, 2010 11:31 PM GMT
    UpperCanadian saidI have also had the experience of a "special constable" try to arrest me for public intoxication when I had a seizure. He insisted I could not be having a seizure because i was not unconcious. icon_rolleyes.gif

    (I have only lost consciousness once during a grand mal seizure - I do not lose consciousness each time...

    I hope you always wear a medic-alert bracelet for epilepsy as I do, with your ID and contact info on it. I run the same risk of police and even medical personnel not realizing I'm not drunk or on drugs, because I can remain conscious during my seizures, too, although my speech may be making little sense.

    I have complex partial seizure disorder, and don't get convulsions. And my seizures can be of varying intensity, ranging from no more than mild disorientation during some to total unconsciousness in others.

    I usually get an "aura" precursor to the seizure (though some neurologists tell me the aura is a mild seizure itself), most often taking the form of sensory hallucinations. My eyes will play tricks on me, I'll hear nonexistent sounds, and most unique to this form of epilepsy are phantom smells, that are usually inappropriate for the place in which I seem to be detecting them. (Such as a strong auto repair garage smell in my living room)

    Other specific signs are my left arm going up to the chest, the hand becoming claw-like. I'll also do "lip-smacking" which is a constant running of my tongue across my lips.

    Depending on the severity of the incident, my speech will slur as I lose tongue control, I may drool, become non-responsive to others, have balance problems, and begin endlessly repeating the same phrase. If things get that far along I almost always will finally become unconscious.

    After the seizure passes I'll have little or no memory of it, and I may sleep for many hours. It causes me no direct pain or injury, except sometimes for a bad headache afterwards. The risk is from falling down stairs, stumbling, falling onto sharp objects, and having other accidents. For this reason I'm told I should not live alone, nor where there are staircases.
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    Dec 15, 2010 3:57 PM GMT
    Caslon17000 saidI saw you have a seizure once. It was weird. I called your son. Remember? You were down in the basement at the time.


    Oh yes I remember that!!


    We were talking on cam and I think I sort of pitched over to one side and started convulsing.


    That was not a nice experience. I felt really bad for frightening you. But thank goodness you did what you did.

    Kinda freaky though that my son got a call from VA telling him to check on his dad in the basement (where my office was then) .


    Fortunately he is a smart boy and was already familiar with the protocol.

    I do have a medic alert but it is constantly falling off my wrist - i need to get one on a necklace.


    That incident with the special constable was defused only because I did have one on that day.

    I actually saw that same guy a few times after and we glared at each other each time (I had lodged a complaint requesting the transit "cops" get better training on recognizing sitns.

    I had enough problems that I had the transit company's special ombudsman for the disabled on speed dial! I got a bit activist after that incident. and I was told the training had been given. I think they just knew who I was then.

    The transit drivers were actually all very good in Ottawa. They get to know you on the roues you take and looked out for me - thery understood I could not move fast with my cane any more.
    Even though the bad experiences tend to stick with me - I have to admit thre wre far many more GOOD experiuences with them.

    (I even had opccsion once to get up and approach the front of the bus where some guy was screaming at the driver and I told him if he did not get off the bus that instant I would jam my cane up his arse!

    All the biddies in the priority seating loved it.

    (People on busses generally do not talk but people in the priority seating (the disabled) tend to talk among ourselves - often about our health. Those seats are right behind the driver, so it does not take too long to become friendly with the drivers.






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    Dec 15, 2010 4:04 PM GMT
    Most embarassing incident on a bus that actually turned out very well:

    One day the bus was rather packed and an old lady got on . No seats were available and no one was giving up a seat so i looked around and said to a veery healthy-looking man and said rather loudly "you;d think SOMEONE wouls stand up for this lady."

    The guy said "I would if i could!!" Only then did I notice his wheelchair!

    I was so embarassed and apologised to him, saing "I'm so sorry - I did not see your chair at all!

    He was with his wife at the time and he was actually delighted!!

    He said someting to the effect o me being the first one in years who saw HIM, and not his CHAIR.

    It forged an instant friendliness and we enjoyed a lovely conversation with a whole bunch of people around us for the entire journey through rush hour traffic



    The moral - we all fuck up but a sincere apology goes a long way.
  • username23

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    Dec 16, 2010 7:52 AM GMT
    I think I'd fire any law officer who arrested a dead person... Just sayin'.
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    Dec 16, 2010 8:38 AM GMT
    I wish that were an isolated incident. It seems like many people who see a native can not see past preconceived notions and stereotypes. I know a family of aboriginals who were killed by a drunk white driver a few weeks ago in Saskatchewan. It did not even make the news outside of the immediate surrounding area. Had it been a white family killed by a drunk native I have no doubt that it would have been well reported on. What makes it so sad is that the extended family had suffered so many losses due to drug and alcohol abuse- and this family did not touch the stuff.

    I am reminded of the RCMP arresting drunk natives around Regina a few years back and dumping them in the rural areas... I will never understand how that is allowed to continue in the force.

    I love the story of the wheelchair, UC. It has been my experience that most people who have physical disabilities are less uncomfortable with their disability than are those around them. I can see where he would have had a good laugh...

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    Dec 16, 2010 8:47 AM GMT
    tallcanuck saidRead the comment from the ER Doctor, the stroke would not have been noticed in hospital because the individual was drunk. The only indicators would have been after she sobered up.

    Sad that a life was lost, but no culpability on the Police's part.

    Bullshit. You do not leave a person who is unresponsive laying on a cell floor for hours in a puddle of urine. According to their own practices, you rouse a drunk every 30 minutes. If you can not, you call EMS. This is the equivalent of saying that people who die in police custody from alcohol poisoning are just a sad waste of life. If the police are there to serve and protect, regardless of whether the person is native, drunk, or belligerent, then they need to follow practices that are put in place to protect prisoners from harm, whether self inflicted or not. I hope those officers who carried on with business as usual while her son begged them to call EMS when she was unresponsive end up feeling something...
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    Dec 16, 2010 9:26 AM GMT
    So, UpperCanadian & Art, it is absolutly bizarre to hear (read) of you guys having seizures involved with the cops etc, because I had an incident very similar myself! So I have temporal lobe epilepsy, diagnosed when I was 16, etc, and my seizures occur in a variety of ways, ie "complex partial seizures" and back in October I was waiting for a taxi to take me home to my place by the lake outside of town. Long story short, I had a started to feel very "not right," and managed to make it over to a building to fall against until it passed; I'm not sure exactly how long I was there, but the next thing I vaguely recall is someone grabbing me to pull me to my feet.
    I was really so out of it I scarcly remember, but I do know I threw a least a punch or two before kicking the person grabbing me... It turned out to be a police officer!!... So after other fun cops arrived to "subdue" me, I ended up in jail. I finally figured out what was going on I tried explaining what happened & they thought I was high on something. After swearing quite profusly, I don't remember much until I found myself on the floor of the jail cell, another seizure, and eventually tried telling them that yes, I'm a epileptic , and yes, I had another seizure.. I was there until my lawyer showed up With My Neurologist!! Good times! I hate cops; why is it the majority of morons in this country have guns?
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    Dec 16, 2010 9:56 AM GMT
    My dad had seizures too, out of being a war veteran with grenade bits in the brain.

    He also had those issues about being taken for a drunk when having a seizure in the street.

    But I also remember the home rule about never contradicting him, for fear he might have a seizure out of contrariety. I suspect he greatly overplayed this part ;-)
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    Dec 16, 2010 11:10 AM GMT
    UpperCanadian saidNo seats were available and no one was giving up a seat so i looked around and said to a veery healthy-looking man and said rather loudly "you;d think SOMEONE wouls stand up for this lady."

    Only obliquely related, but made me think of this: when in New York City a few years ago, everyone, and I EVERYONE, even women, kept trying to offer me their seats because I limp & walk with a cane. In New York! Who woulda thunk?

    On the crowded bus from the airport, on the subways, also offering to move me ahead of them in waiting lines, to take their bench seat in public places, just everywhere. Naturally I politely declined with many thanks, I'm not that bad off yet. But either I really do look terribly infirm, or else New Yorkers aren't quite the selfish bastards they're often portrayed.
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    Dec 16, 2010 11:14 AM GMT
    minox saidBut I also remember the home rule about never contradicting him, for fear he might have a seizure out of contrariety. I suspect he greatly overplayed this part ;-)

    Stress, fatigue and emotional agitation seem to increase the chances I'll have a seizure. Whether this also happens to your father, and whether he unscrupulously exploits it to his advantage, I wouldn't know, but both causes are possibilities.
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    Dec 16, 2010 11:44 AM GMT
    EccentricStud saidSo, UpperCanadian & Art, it is absolutly bizarre to hear (read) of you guys having seizures involved with the cops etc, because I had an incident very similar myself! So I have temporal lobe epilepsy, diagnosed when I was 16, etc, and my seizures occur in a variety of ways, ie "complex partial seizures"...

    ...I was [in jail] until my lawyer showed up With My Neurologist!! Good times! I hate cops; why is it the majority of morons in this country have guns?

    Yes, I have TLE, also, which produces my complex partial seizures. So do you wear a medic-alert bracelet or necklace? You must always! Mine never comes off, except at airport TSA checkpoints.

    The cops or EMTs may overlook it, but if they do, and abuse you or give incorrect treatment, your legal case against them is much stronger. And although I may be too far gone to show them my bracelet myself, many times I can. When they see this plate that reads EPILEPSY with my name engraved on it, and bearing a red cross, they pay serious attention, or ignore it at their peril.

    And they better not try removing it, because everyone knows I'm never without it: my doctor, my attorney, my partner, all my friends. Plus I keep a medical card in my wallet, all the data's in my iPhone, etc. To defend themselves in a lawsuit they'd have to claim they found me stark naked. For which possibility I may consider getting a tattoo. LOL!

    Because I have no shame about being an epileptic, though I know some people do. Sure, I'd rather not have it, and disputed the doctors when they first diagnosed me.

    But the fact is I DO have it, denial won't make it go away, so the next step is to deal with it head on. I let all my friends know I have it; I want them not to fear it or me, and know that if I have a seizure in front of them it's OK, I can't die, I won't swallow my tongue or any of those other myths.

    Just sit me down, keep on eye on me, sell tickets if you want. It'll pass on its own, no need to panic and call 911. I'll owe you all a round when I'm back on my feet, for causing all this drama. And ya know what? My friends are the best, and I don't think anybody shuns me because of this.

    BTW, did you know there's a so-called TLE personality? Read up on it, and see if my posts here don't prove it exists, and that I have it. Do you? Many experts dispute it, or reject it on the basis of wanting to prevent harmful stereotypes & prejudices.
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    Dec 16, 2010 2:45 PM GMT
    Just having you guys "come out"with your own seizure disorders helps me acknowledge my own.

    I too dismissed any notion of it when it was first raised as a potential. Having something that affects your brain is a pretty dismaying thing to be told (when one is as proud as I - growing up in a family where academic achievement was everything.

    I really (wrongly) felt diminished and humiliated that I should now have these "short circuits."


    The thought that what happened to this poor woman could just as easily happen to me was so distressing I could not even take my usual care in composing my post - hence the poorly worded topic title.

    My pride initially would have me rush to correct it once the first idiot above commented on the poor wording, but I then decided - "fuck you. It is bloody clear what i am trying to say and if one is so petty as to crow about it, then that speaks to the kind of person they are.

    So it stands as I wrote it - and it accurately depicts how angered I was that I could not take my usual care.



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    Dec 16, 2010 3:06 PM GMT
    Because of the reminders here, though, I have had the link fixed on my Medic Alert and I am again wearing it on my wrist.

    icon_biggrin.gif