Cure for HIV? I hope this is true!

  • ZacktheMan

    Posts: 340

    Dec 15, 2010 1:31 AM GMT
    From http://www.foxnews.com/

    http://www.foxnews.com/health/2010/12/14/doctors-claim-hiv-positive-man-cured-stem-cell-transplant/

    Doctors say a man living with HIV may have been cured after receiving a transplant of stem cells from a donor carrying a rare, inherited gene mutation that seems to make carriers virtually immune to HIV infection
  • ZacktheMan

    Posts: 340

    Dec 15, 2010 1:38 AM GMT
    ZacktheMan saidFrom http://www.foxnews.com/

    http://www.foxnews.com/health/2010/12/14/doctors-claim-hiv-positive-man-cured-stem-cell-transplant/

    Doctors say a man living with HIV may have been cured after receiving a transplant of stem cells from a donor carrying a rare, inherited gene mutation that seems to make carriers virtually immune to HIV infection


    Even so, There are difficulties, but it may lead to an easier cure. From the above article:

    "“This is not prime time to me at all,” he said. “This is a very unusual situation that has little practical application for a simple reason. This donor not only had to be a good compatible match, but the donor had to have a genetic defect of cells that do not express the receptor that the HIV virus needs to enter the cell.”

    Fauci also pointed to the fact that this transplant process is not only expensive, it’s incredibly painful and complicated, and requires the patient to start a whole new regimen of drugs."

  • conservativej...

    Posts: 2465

    Dec 15, 2010 1:45 AM GMT
    They are on the right track. How do I know? I am a Delta32 carrier with interest in just this type of research.
  • ZacktheMan

    Posts: 340

    Dec 15, 2010 1:49 AM GMT
    conservativejock saidThey are on the right track. How do I know? I am a Delta32 carrier with interest in just this type of research.


    Well, I'm truly hoping it will become a reality, and not an ardous painful one.
  • conservativej...

    Posts: 2465

    Dec 15, 2010 1:59 AM GMT
    ZacktheMan said
    conservativejock saidThey are on the right track. How do I know? I am a Delta32 carrier with interest in just this type of research.


    Well, I'm truly hoping it will become a reality, and not an ardous painful one.


    Enabling such research at the individual level is painful. Then there is the matter of dollars.
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    Dec 15, 2010 2:17 AM GMT
    All I had to see was Fox News. I didn't bother opening the link.

    Offer another link to a reputable news site, please.
  • Mepark

    Posts: 806

    Dec 15, 2010 2:22 AM GMT
    RiverRising saidAll I had to see was Fox News. I didn't bother opening the link.

    Offer another link to a reputable news site, please.


    icon_rolleyes.gif
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    Dec 15, 2010 2:25 AM GMT
    RiverRising saidAll I had to see was Fox News. I didn't bother opening the link.

    Offer another link to a reputable news site, please.


    Here is an earlier thread today started by Mocktwinkie that has a link to a different source. Unfortunately I was the only one to post. I guess threads on what could lead to a cure for HIV/Aids can't compete with threads about Mariah Carey or 'Could you date a guy with a flat ass.'

    http://www.realjock.com/gayforums/1278086
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    Dec 15, 2010 2:38 AM GMT
    RiverRising saidAll I had to see was Fox News. I didn't bother opening the link.

    Offer another link to a reputable news site, please.


    The report is accurate. As a poster stated above, there is little applicability to the current state of medicine. The donor was a CCR5 delta-32 homozygote. Some folks (a very small number) have similar genetic patterns affecting proteins on the surface of their CD4 cells. The recipient of the donated stem cells had leukemia and had to have his immune system and marrow destroyed prior to transplant.... Not a very practical treatment. The recipient was treated in 2007, but they just decided to say he's 'cured' due to his apparent lack of viral load rebound.
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    Dec 15, 2010 2:44 AM GMT
    Was reading about future research yesterday. Lots of stuff developing over the next decade.

    http://www.advocate.com/Health_and_Fitness/Here_To_Inspire/2010_and_Beyond/
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    Dec 15, 2010 2:49 AM GMT
    RiverRising saidAll I had to see was Fox News. I didn't bother opening the link.

    Offer another link to a reputable news site, please.


    Your leftard news sites are far more biased than Fox news. Schluffington Post should have the story, though, if they aren't too busy whining about how straight white Christian men are the most evil people on the planet and how we should feel guilty for the things people with the same skin color have done centuries before.
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    Dec 15, 2010 2:56 AM GMT
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/12/14/hiv-cure-berlin-patient_n_796521.html
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    Dec 15, 2010 3:03 AM GMT
    wow..could it be? Every year there is progress to finding a cure for this disease and after its announced that a cure is getting close..the research stops and thats the end of it..you really think pharmaceutical companies and the worlds government would want a cure? Their economy depend on people living with hiv and many other diseases.
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    Dec 15, 2010 3:19 AM GMT
    This case is more of a curiosity packaged as a case report rather than truly applicable to everybody currently.

    What it does provide is partial evidence that reservoirs that are inaccessible to current therapy can be eventually eradicated by gene therapy, i.e. if there was an easier and less risky way to introduce the delta-CCR5 mutation into the patient's own stem cells, the hope is that eventually these stem cells can replace the CCR5-containing cells in the reservoirs.
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    Dec 15, 2010 4:34 AM GMT
    CCR5-delta 32 isnt that uncommon in the European population, and they've known about the immunity for quite some time. The issue with stem-celling it is you would need to basically have all the blood cells converted, something kind of possible when your talking about leukemia treatment, but not particularly easy to replicate in a normal person. And its not exactly the cheap vaccine the developing world needs to actually eradicate the virus.
  • mv03

    Posts: 201

    Dec 15, 2010 4:39 AM GMT
    This is old. Look at thebody.com. I don't know why this is now just making the news. Same thing with crocodile blood supposedly killing the disease in Australian trials.
  • conservativej...

    Posts: 2465

    Dec 15, 2010 4:50 AM GMT
    KyleAD saidCCR5-delta 32 isnt that uncommon in the European population, and they've known about the immunity for quite some time. The issue with stem-celling it is you would need to basically have all the blood cells converted, something kind of possible when your talking about leukemia treatment, but not particularly easy to replicate in a normal person. And its not exactly the cheap vaccine the developing world needs to actually eradicate the virus.


    You are correct. I had posted a couple of months ago asking the question "how much would you pay for an HIV cure?" Both a cure and a vaccine may initially be very expensive.

    Both have been of interest to me both personally and financially since 1987. I have lost all of my close friends of that time except for two.

    We believed early on that a solution to HIV would not come directly from any large pharmaceutical company or government lab. In that effort, all three of us contributed to private entities working towards a solution. All three of us have been successful to a point in life that we can make a significant effort in the ultimate eradication of HIV as the years proceed.

    This is to some degree a basis for my disgust of so many on RJ who feel anyone who has succeeded to my level should be taxed like hell. The idiots don't understand how those dollars are better directed by the individual to such efforts as I have taken to overcome HIV.

    Yes, there will be profits generated. There will be taxes paid. But in the meantime, many more die on a global basis because the timely application of dollars is so important in driving to a solution to HIV.
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    Dec 15, 2010 5:18 AM GMT
    Thanks for posting this and then breaking it down for our digestion. It has been making the rounds on Facebook today. Quick question: one of the problems stated is that the donor type is rare. Culturing technology should be able to address production, right? If so, is the issue then compatibility of the recipient? Addressable through an immunosuppressive drug regimen. Would that regimen even need to be permanent?

    But yeah, it seems to be a bit 'pie-in-the-sky' considering the complexities of treatment and the scale of the problem throughout the world. A bit premature to get excited. icon_neutral.gif
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    Dec 15, 2010 5:47 AM GMT
    RiverRising saidAll I had to see was Fox News. I didn't bother opening the link.

    Offer another link to a reputable news site, please.
    Such an old story, but the BBC version is not as pessimistic as the fox news story, imo. Both are somewhat unbiased, however. Look- not to sound like a super optimist/romantic lunatic, but this could be the penicillin of the 21st century.

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/7726118.stm
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    Dec 15, 2010 6:20 AM GMT
    I love reading these stories, but have you guys ever noticed that things like this pop up every once in awhile and then you never hear much about them again??? Is it that they are still researching or what?
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    Dec 15, 2010 12:58 PM GMT
    mane8tuh1 saidI love reading these stories, but have you guys ever noticed that things like this pop up every once in awhile and then you never hear much about them again??? Is it that they are still researching or what?


    You just missed the whole point of the article...which IS a follow up on the previous report in which the authors showed that his

    "viral replication remained absent despite discontinuation of antiretroviral therapy after transplantation with CCR5{Delta}32/{Delta}32 stem cells."

    What was predicted at that time:

    "However, it was expected that the long-lived viral reservoir would lead to HIV rebound and disease progression during the process of immune reconstitution."

    The new findings that they could not have made without an adequate amount of time is

    1. In the present study, we demonstrate successful reconstitution of CD4+ T cells at the systemic level as well as in the gut mucosal immune system following CCR5{Delta}32/{Delta}32 stem cell transplantation, while the patient remains without any sign of HIV infection. This was observed although recovered CD4+ T cells contain a high proportion of activated memory CD4+ T cells, i.e. the preferential targets of HIV, and are susceptible to productive infection with CXCR4-tropic HIV.
    2.Furthermore, during the process of immune reconstitution, we found evidence for the replacement of long-lived host tissue cells with donor-derived cells indicating that the size of the viral reservoir has been reduced over time.

    Does this belong on the front page? No. It is news nonetheless, and brings up a whole host of other questions for further research, e.g.:

    1. Is this going to depend on the particular patient and/or donor? What are those characteristics that allow his outcome (i.e. retention of memory CD4 cells while allowing replacement of long-lived host tissue cells)?
    2. Would partial (i.e. nonablative) stem cell transplants with a CCR5-delta donor have a similar but smaller effect?
    3. Is this a true cure or just prolonged remission? How small exactly is the viral reservoir over time? Would we find HIV if we were to biopsy some really inaccessible tissue (e.g. brain glial cells)?

    Don't quote me on the percentages, but 90% of science is hard work and patience, 10% insight and seredipity.
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    Dec 15, 2010 1:03 PM GMT
    q1w2e3 saidThis case is more of a curiosity packaged as a case report rather than truly applicable to everybody currently.

    What it does provide is partial evidence that reservoirs that are inaccessible to current therapy can be eventually eradicated by gene therapy, i.e. if there was an easier and less risky way to introduce the delta-CCR5 mutation into the patient's own stem cells, the hope is that eventually these stem cells can replace the CCR5-containing cells in the reservoirs.


    That makes alot more sense to me than giving everyone donor derived stem cells... donor-derived cells can come with a plethora of problems after all, including allergies
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    Dec 15, 2010 1:05 PM GMT
    BTW, HIV immunity has been found in a population of African prostitutes before as well... women who regularly serviced infected clients, but never got infected themselves....

    Its a bit the old evolutionary arms-race operating between hosts and diseases
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    Dec 15, 2010 1:18 PM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle said
    mane8tuh1 saidHave you guys ever noticed that things like this pop up every once in awhile and then you never hear much about them again???


    Yep, I have noticed this all the time. It happens roughly two to three times a year. And since this is basically old news regurgitated we cannot factor this article as something new under the sun.

    WASTE. OF. MY. TIME.


    I agree. It's interesting, but my mental and physical health is better served enjoying my life under its current set of circumstances rather than pinning my hopes on yet another breakthrough that may or may not pan out. I stopped getting excited about this stuff about a decade ago.

    Progress is fantastic. I will, however, withhold my jubilation until such time as there is a practical application.
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    Dec 15, 2010 1:21 PM GMT
    RowBuddy saidthis is actually old news. This was first published about a year ago.


    Submitted September 23, 2010; accepted December 2, 2010.
    http://bloodjournal.hematologylibrary.org/cgi/content/abstract/blood-2010-09-309591v1

    Read my reply on page 1 as to why this is new!