In a lot of pain - Legs

  • Lupena

    Posts: 24

    Dec 15, 2010 6:44 PM GMT
    So I just had my first session with my trainer, and it felt awesome, however it's now two days later and my quads are sore to the point where sitting down is a difficult task. I have to fall into my seat. She had me do a lot of squat exercises.

    What can I do for this? I don't want to take advil or tylenol because it's caused me stomach problems in the past and I can't take it anymore. Stretching itself huuuurts.

    Ideas?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 15, 2010 6:56 PM GMT
    Go ride a bike at low intensity. You'll feel better right away.

    Research DOMS (Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness)

    It's all part of the process.
  • Lupena

    Posts: 24

    Dec 15, 2010 6:59 PM GMT
    Awesome, thank you!

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    Dec 17, 2010 7:32 PM GMT
    chuckystud saidGo ride a bike at low intensity. You'll feel better right away.

    Research DOMS (Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness)

    It's all part of the process.
    ^^^that

    Or, just walk at a normal pace for a mile or two...or more.

    My motto is: "If you're not getting sore, you're not training hard enough." icon_wink.gif
  • str8hardbody9

    Posts: 1519

    Dec 17, 2010 7:38 PM GMT
    light trendmill for 25 minutes then go to jacuzzi for 15 min and you will be fine.. Goodluckl!!icon_biggrin.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 17, 2010 7:45 PM GMT
    paulflexes said
    chuckystud saidGo ride a bike at low intensity. You'll feel better right away.

    Research DOMS (Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness)

    It's all part of the process.
    ^^^that

    Or, just walk at a normal pace for a mile or two...or more.

    My motto is: "If you're not getting sore, you're not training hard enough." icon_wink.gif


    That's old school hokus pokus. In a well trained individual, soreness isn't a good indicator of where you should be. After 35 years of training, I very rarely experience soreness. My ability to recover, and the way I train, are likely why.

    Too sore, too often, is counterproductive to your efforts. You should train enough to stimulate, but, not enough to over train, and train infrequently enough to allow for recovery. Depends on the intensity of the work out, and the parts worked, that recovery period could be as long as 10 days in a person not taking androgens.

    You make gains in your recovery. Too many folks train, too often, with too few calories, and too little recovery. That's why they fail. LESS is often better. Calories are the single most critical item, aside from lifting itself, that shape gains. The saying goes, "get in; get out." Most folks would do well to do that and to EAT.
  • NerdLifter

    Posts: 1509

    Dec 17, 2010 8:11 PM GMT
    chuckystud said
    Too sore, too often, is counterproductive to your efforts. You should train enough to stimulate, but, not enough to over train, and train infrequently enough to allow for recovery. Depends on the intensity of the work out, and the parts worked, that recovery period could be as long as 10 days in a person not taking androgens.

    You make gains in your recovery. Too many folks train, too often, with too few calories, and too little recovery. That's why they fail. LESS is often better. Calories are the single most critical item, aside from lifting itself, that shape gains. The saying goes, "get in; get out." Most folks would do well to do that and to EAT.


    I used to train way too frequently, I noticed that I stopped making gains. So, I started working out 3 times or less a week instead, focusing on getting adequate sleep and EAT EAT EAT, and I made huge strength gains. Less is more, especially if you have a very high metabolism body like me, going too often is counterproductive.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 17, 2010 8:29 PM GMT
    Each time I start a squat period, I feel just like you after the first session.
    Unable to walk down stair, people in the street might think I'm disabled ;-)

    It's nothing to worry about, and it's even unrelated to how heavy you work, it's a normal reaction because you use you leg muscle on a far longer path than usual with a charge. As result, you got micro tearing in the conjunctive tissues and a small inflammation reaction in all muscle mass. It end up giving you, not just more strong leg muscles, but also more elastic ones.

    Over time, it's even become a good feeling, as it not related to injuries, just mean your worked hard enough to use your muscles the way they are designed to work.

    And yes, the pain usually pic two days after, then it take several days until you feel nothing at all.

    And to paraphrase some stud....

    I'm a well trained individual, after 38years or training, I regularly experience soreness.
    Soreness is unavoidable when you develop strength, and any weight training that you are not used to will first develop your strength. It's only when you train using exercises and weight your body is used too that soreness become rare.

    So, a beginner will feel sore if he work hard enough, until he reach a level where he use his strength to develop muscular volume.
    And a power lifter or athlete will always feel sore, because his purpose is to develop strength.

    For the practical aspect, if the pain bugs you too much, try to drink a lot of water and take a very hot bath. I add aspirin too, but I don't have stomach issues.
  • MikemikeMike

    Posts: 6932

    Dec 18, 2010 9:49 PM GMT
    try calcium magnesium supplements after workout. It will greatly reduce muscle soreness.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 18, 2010 10:05 PM GMT
    Sore muscles happen when cells in your muscles start anaerobic respiration, which leads to create milk acid.
    Take a warm bath, it speeds up metabolism of milk acid in muscles.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 18, 2010 10:59 PM GMT
    Delayed onset muscle soreness is thought to be a result of microscopic tearing of the muscle fibers. The amount of tearing (and soreness) depends on how hard and how long you exercise and what type of exercise you do. Any movement you aren't used to can lead to DOMS, but eccentric muscle contractions (movements that cause muscle to forcefully contract while it lengthens) seem to cause the most soreness.

    Old school "lore" feels that it's lactic acid buildup, but, good research has shown otherwise.

    Some folks aren't up on the latest, and, give bad advice.

    Here's some ideas / info:

    http://sportsmedicine.about.com/cs/injuries/a/doms.htm