Net Carbs

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    Dec 21, 2010 4:33 AM GMT
    Is the idea of Net Carbs valid? I've been doing Atkins and they seem to be the only plan which incorporates it into the overall method.
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    Dec 22, 2010 1:08 AM GMT
    There was recently a guy who ate nothing but potatoes for 60 days, and he ended up losing weight. Personally, I don't buy the idea that a particular macronutrient ratio, regardless of calories, will magically make weight drop off. Sure, a diet that's heavier in protein will have more metabolic overhead (protein takes more energy to metabolize), but in the big picture, weight loss requires a caloric deficit.

    For me, the success of low-carb dieting lies solely in the far greater capacity of fat and protein to sate the appetite. With low enough carbohydrate intake, I can go several days eating less than 2000 calories a day and only experience the mildest of hunger impulses. I don't know if it's carbohydrate sensitivity, reactive hypoglycemia, or what, but if I eat a significant amount of starch, I will be ravenously hungry a few hours later and binge uncontrollably. That's why I got fat on a predominantly vegetarian, new-age hippy diet full of whole grains and beans.

    Which is not to say that my experience is going to be yours. My advice is to eat consciously and be aware of how your body reacts to foods. Then, on the basis of what you discover, eat a diet that lets you lose weight with minimal discomfort or cravings.
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    Dec 22, 2010 1:20 AM GMT
    paradox saidThere was recently a guy who ate nothing but potatoes for 60 days, and he ended up losing weight. Personally, I don't buy the idea that a particular macronutrient ratio, regardless of calories, will magically make weight drop off. Sure, a diet that's heavier in protein will have more metabolic overhead (protein takes more energy to metabolize), but in the big picture, weight loss requires a caloric deficit.

    For me, the success of low-carb dieting lies solely in the far greater capacity of fat and protein to sate the appetite. With low enough carbohydrate intake, I can go several days eating less than 2000 calories a day and only experience the mildest of hunger impulses. I don't know if it's carbohydrate sensitivity, reactive hypoglycemia, or what, but if I eat a significant amount of starch, I will be ravenously hungry a few hours later and binge uncontrollably. That's why I got fat on a predominantly vegetarian, new-age hippy diet full of whole grains and beans.

    Which is not to say that my experience is going to be yours. My advice is to eat consciously and be aware of how your body reacts to foods. Then, on the basis of what you discover, eat a diet that lets you lose weight with minimal discomfort or cravings.


    Great post. Lots of good info.
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    Dec 22, 2010 1:26 AM GMT
    Net Carbs seems to be a big marketing gimmick on food packages. All I know is that, as a type 1 diabetic, if I don't count the total carbs instead of the net carbs listed on food packaging and increase my mealtime insulin accordingly, my blood sugar level will go way too high. It doesn't just pass through you with no effect on the body. I think food manufacturers may take too much liberty on what is actually carbs you need to count.
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    Dec 22, 2010 1:48 AM GMT
    paradox saidThere was recently a guy who ate nothing but potatoes for 60 days, and he ended up losing weight. Personally, I don't buy the idea that a particular macronutrient ratio, regardless of calories, will magically make weight drop off. Sure, a diet that's heavier in protein will have more metabolic overhead (protein takes more energy to metabolize), but in the big picture, weight loss requires a caloric deficit.

    For me, the success of low-carb dieting lies solely in the far greater capacity of fat and protein to sate the appetite. With low enough carbohydrate intake, I can go several days eating less than 2000 calories a day and only experience the mildest of hunger impulses. I don't know if it's carbohydrate sensitivity, reactive hypoglycemia, or what, but if I eat a significant amount of starch, I will be ravenously hungry a few hours later and binge uncontrollably. That's why I got fat on a predominantly vegetarian, new-age hippy diet full of whole grains and beans.

    Which is not to say that my experience is going to be yours. My advice is to eat consciously and be aware of how your body reacts to foods. Then, on the basis of what you discover, eat a diet that lets you lose weight with minimal discomfort or cravings.


    The hunger comes from the renewed presence of insulin in your blood stream / insulin over shoot. That why fat folks feel hungry, yet, are often not nourished. They bounce their insulin around constantly through very poor food choices and blood sugar peaks and valleys. Insulin LOWERS your blood sugar, and..low blood sugar set the "I need to eat" process into motion. Insulin is the "shuttle hormone" and shuttles nutrition into cells. It's vital to have carbs in order to do that, as well as to have gyclogen for physical work. (Carbing up.)

    Low carb dieting is a pretty bad idea. Moderate carbs, every 2.5 hours is a much better idea.

    We see huge bodybuilders these days because, in part, they've mastered the use of exogenous insulin making for a highly anabolic environment.

    Insulin management is key to being lean, and to making gains, and to being healthy. Developing low sensitivity to insulin (via too much blood sugar for too long) leads to type 2 diabetes.

    Current studies speculate that nearly 1/3 of all U.S. citizens will have type 2 diabetes by the year 2020.

    HIIT INCREASES your insulin sensitivity, as well as improves your cardiac threshold, dramatically. HIIT should be in almost everyone's program.
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    Dec 22, 2010 2:22 AM GMT
    Sometimes I call my diet low-carb, but moderate carb is probably a more accurate description. When I first lost weight weight back in 2003, I never stopped eating apples and carrots, which are a big no-no in the early phases of Atkins. And earlier this year, when I was leaning out a bit with fitday.com, my carb intake was at least 80 grams a day, and strictly speaking, truly low-carb diets are 60 grams or less. I once tried going super low carb, but I couldn't get past the splitting headaches.