Believing in Santa Claus

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    Dec 23, 2010 3:53 AM GMT
    Today, two of my nieces came over to help set up and decorate the tree. As we were putting up ornaments and the lights, I asked my 6 year old niece what she wanted Santa to bring her for Christmas. She turned around and looked at me and said "Santa's not real..." in a very matter-of-fact tone. This girl is 6 years old and she's flooding the house with her know-it-all blabber right in front of my other niece who is 3. Where did the magic go? What happened to believing?

    This day and age it seems like old traditions have died. Little kids are growing up with out the magic of the small things in life, and I just feel bad because Santa was a big part of being a kid. Imaginations are dwindling, kids are taught different, and all the while they lose a bit of their childhood that should be special for them.

    I know it's ludacris for older people to believe in Santa, but it pains me that all my niece believes Christmas to be is how much money her parents spent on her. Anyways, at what ages did you stop believing in Santa? I was around 11 or 12, but I'm unusually gullible so I expect that that is somewhat late.

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    Dec 23, 2010 4:06 AM GMT
    That's surpising a 6 year old would know there's no Santa and then tell her even younger sister. Word of mouth seems to be happening at younger and younger ages. I was around 9 or 10 when someone told me there was no Santa. I was so disappointed but rather than tell younger kids there was no Santa, I kept the fantasy alive for them. Children are growing up too fast, and it's sad seeing their innocence lost so soon.
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    Dec 23, 2010 6:21 AM GMT
    Oh... I thought this was going to be about the perfect man that everyone is waiting for.

    I can't remember ever believing in Santa Claus, or the Easter Bunny, or Jeezus, or the Tooth Fairy, or Curious George. It was all just fun and games.

    People who tried to get too serious about that stuff were scary clowns. And kinda stupid.
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    Dec 23, 2010 6:25 AM GMT
    There was a rule in my house, when you stopped believing in Santa you stopped getting your Santa Gift (usually kick ass) I think we all made it to University before conceding icon_biggrin.gif

    My brother in law once refused to tell his parents and/or Santa what he wanted for Christmas when he was 5, he was the only one out of 6 kids that didn't get anything.
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    Dec 23, 2010 7:22 AM GMT
    Maybe you should be thankful that your niece has no intention of believing in fairy tales. You should commend her for her precocious intelligence. It's a good start to have on the rest of her life.
  • CuriousJockAZ

    Posts: 19136

    Dec 23, 2010 7:27 AM GMT
    I remember when I was around 8 the babysitter told my brother and I that there was no Santa Clause or Easter Bunny. I was so upset...but I never told my parents, and I still left cookies and milk by the fireplace. Every Christmas morning the cookies were eaten and the milk was gone. That stupid babysitter. What does SHE know! icon_wink.gif




    (....runs off to write Christmas list to Santa)
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    Dec 23, 2010 7:31 AM GMT
    Animus saidMaybe you should be thankful that your niece has no intention of believing in fairy tales. You should commend her for her precocious intelligence. It's a good start to have on the rest of her life.


    It's not about the literal existence of Santa, it's embracing the possibility that anything is possible. Killing a part of childhood wonder because it's "fantasy" is a terrible thing to do. Kids need to imagine, the ability to dream, why take away the magic?
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    Dec 23, 2010 7:42 AM GMT
    I supposed I'm gullible too because i stopped believing in Santa Claus at 11 when i discovered where my dad kept the xmas gifts .....

    but rather than spreading the word, I let other kids think he did exist.

    Haha, it was fun, to make the letter to Santa Claus with what you wanted. If you were a good boy he'll bring you your gifts ....
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    Dec 23, 2010 7:53 AM GMT
    Whoa, hold the fucking boat here........You're trying to say .....there is.......no...........Santa??? wtf..............communist bastards...........k

    next you'll be telling me reindeer don't fucking fly.....geez...........icon_rolleyes.gif
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    Dec 23, 2010 8:21 AM GMT
    I don't remember what age I was, but I do remember being pretty upset when I found out because I felt like I was being lied to and didn't know what else my parents might be lying about!

    But this made me think: what age do kids start using internet these days? I honestly have no idea, but I assume if they don't know already, it wouldn't be long before they google "is santa real?"
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    Dec 23, 2010 10:47 AM GMT
    tallcanuck said
    Animus saidMaybe you should be thankful that your niece has no intention of believing in fairy tales. You should commend her for her precocious intelligence. It's a good start to have on the rest of her life.


    It's not about the literal existence of Santa, it's embracing the possibility that anything is possible. Killing a part of childhood wonder because it's "fantasy" is a terrible thing to do. Kids need to imagine, the ability to dream, why take away the magic?

    Knowing that Santa doesn't exist isn't going to stifle her imagination.
  • Rowing_Ant

    Posts: 1504

    Dec 23, 2010 10:58 AM GMT
    Agreed.
  • thebigtwist

    Posts: 102

    Dec 23, 2010 11:00 AM GMT
    I can't remember ever believing in Santa. I remember a lengthy period where I pretended to believe in Santa, because I knew if I told my parents that I knew, they would be upset that my childlike innocence had been shattered.
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    Dec 23, 2010 2:29 PM GMT
    I BELIEVE!!! (I'm just sayin...) What's the harm? It's all about the little pleasures in life, these are a part of the "good" things in life that we need to hold on to. There's so much hurt and pain in the world, why not enjoy these little things that make us happy, even for a brief moment.
  • Timbales

    Posts: 13993

    Dec 23, 2010 2:32 PM GMT
    My 6 year old niece told me that someone in her class said there was no Santa. I told her I believed in Santa and that if you don't believe, he doesn't bring you a special gift.

    She asked why there are so many fake Santas (mall Santas, etc.). I told her that Santa is very busy making toys, so he uses his magic and asks special people to help him. He uses his magic snowball to see and hear what everyone says to his helpers when they visit them.
  • neosyllogy

    Posts: 1714

    Dec 23, 2010 3:12 PM GMT
    Yeah, how terrible that we're not lying to our kids as much...

    I seriously think the tendency of adults to lie to kids in the interest of 'fun' or 'imagination' or occasionally laziness ('don't go down there or monsters will eat you!') is just unhealthy. Aside from screwing up the kids' sense of how the world works (and kids are smart, they'd be even smarter if we didn't fuck with the truth) it ultimately sets up a certain level of distrust in the parents and general world that I don't think is emotionally healthy.

    As for the "magic". Why do you think there isn't any just because kids know santa isn't real. My brother and I grew up without those weird kinds of lies and we loved Christmas. We still enjoyed santa claus, and the meaning, and themes. We didn't need to be tricked into thinking there was a fat man who ran all around the world giving presents to good kids (and apparently all the starving kids in the world were naughty...).

    That said, this is an analogue of the "does science drain magic from life" argument? I am a firm believer that it does the opposite. The world is plenty magical without resorting lies, I'd rather my kids enjoy the real magic and mysteries of the world.

    (Speaking of which: if the 6 year old has an attitude about this, it's probably pretty understandable. She recently realized it's all a big lie -- I'd be f'ing irate; and definitely not conspiratorial about it.)
  • neosyllogy

    Posts: 1714

    Dec 23, 2010 3:13 PM GMT
    Timberoo saidMy 6 year old niece told me that someone in her class said there was no Santa. I told her I believed in Santa and that if you don't believe, he doesn't bring you a special gift.

    She asked why there are so many fake Santas (mall Santas, etc.). I told her that Santa is very busy making toys, so he uses his magic and asks special people to help him. He uses his magic snowball to see and hear what everyone says to his helpers when they visit them.


    Some of you people are sick.
    Well-meaning, but sick. icon_evil.gif
  • neosyllogy

    Posts: 1714

    Dec 23, 2010 3:17 PM GMT
    tallcanuck said
    Animus saidMaybe you should be thankful that your niece has no intention of believing in fairy tales. You should commend her for her precocious intelligence. It's a good start to have on the rest of her life.


    It's not about the literal existence of Santa, it's embracing the possibility that anything is possible. Killing a part of childhood wonder because it's "fantasy" is a terrible thing to do. Kids need to imagine, the ability to dream, why take away the magic?


    But if anything it does the opposite. When you couch all their imagination and fantasy under falsehoods that are later stripped away you, if anything, hinder imagination. You turn fantasy and "magic" into something that's only for little kids and is associated with having been lied to (which is unpleasant). Kids aren't you. They'll imagine just fine without you making up stories and telling them they're real.
    No wonder so many adults are so goddamn boring...
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    Dec 23, 2010 3:23 PM GMT
    I stopped believing at the age of 9 (almost 10, just a week or so before my b-day)...while walking home from our grandmother's after school, my older brothers told me how they knew I was getting this really cool Big Wheel & they saw our parents assembling it...I was a bit crushed, but I still wanted to believe... :-]
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    Dec 23, 2010 3:34 PM GMT
    I was a child that believed in Santa and loved every moment of. I felt that it wasn't a lie my parents told me but something they allowed me to participate in. It was a magical time of year when Santa came. These days kids have to have some much drama and bad circumstances at such a young age, why not allow them the opportunity to believe that a fat jolly old man will reward them for their good behavior.?

    I think it does create positive energy and excitement in children and they deserve that.
  • Timbales

    Posts: 13993

    Dec 23, 2010 4:48 PM GMT
    neosyllogy said
    Timberoo saidMy 6 year old niece told me that someone in her class said there was no Santa. I told her I believed in Santa and that if you don't believe, he doesn't bring you a special gift.

    She asked why there are so many fake Santas (mall Santas, etc.). I told her that Santa is very busy making toys, so he uses his magic and asks special people to help him. He uses his magic snowball to see and hear what everyone says to his helpers when they visit them.


    Some of you people are sick.
    Well-meaning, but sick. icon_evil.gif


    Yup, I'm sick. Seeing my 6 year old niece sad at my company's kid's Christmas party because everyone else was excited about Santa coming to visit because some little bitch in her class said something to her turned me evil.

    I should have just told her the truth - Christmas is about retailers wanting to make a profit and she should make sure she doesn't put all her Christmas trash out at once or someone will break into her house and steal things.
  • LuckyGuyKC

    Posts: 2080

    Dec 23, 2010 5:04 PM GMT
    I still believe ..... and so do my children. Try delivering meals on Christmas morning to people who you will be the only other human being they see that day, reach out and hold their hand and then ask them if it would be ok if you could give them a hug because you have had a tough year. Then look in the mirror and if you don't see Santa, then try it again over and over until you do.

    The magic of Christmas isn't the myth of Santa or the reality of Santa; it isn't reserved for Christians; it is available to anyone open to giving or receiving.
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    Dec 23, 2010 5:11 PM GMT
    The magic of Christmas isn't the myth of Santa or the reality of Santa; it isn't reserved for Christians; it is available to anyone open to giving or receiving.

    Amen brother! icon_biggrin.gif
  • dreamer121

    Posts: 265

    Dec 23, 2010 5:14 PM GMT
    I had my moments of not believing in Santa... from like 3rd or 4th grade or whenever it was I found out, til sometime in high school.

    But today I celebrate Christmas more for Santa than anyone else... not the retailer/gift giving concept... but the for idea of magic and pure imagination, and all that wonderful craziness. From the sparkle in ones eyes, to the lights & decorations, even to those bell ringing crazies from the Salvation Army.
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    Dec 23, 2010 5:54 PM GMT
    Animus saidMaybe you should be thankful that your niece has no intention of believing in fairy tales. You should commend her for her precocious intelligence. It's a good start to have on the rest of her life.


    Actually, she's one of the smartest kids at her age in my state. She's already at an 8th grade reading level and she is doing algebra... but still...