An Animated History of North America

  • swimbikerun

    Posts: 2835

    Dec 24, 2010 1:58 AM GMT
    Learn ya something!
    aFUm1.gif
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    Dec 24, 2010 4:57 AM GMT
    I think i learned more with this animation than i ever did in school
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    Dec 24, 2010 5:02 AM GMT
    my ancestors sure loved them blankets!
  • mynyun

    Posts: 1346

    Dec 24, 2010 7:19 AM GMT
    Ha ha that's awesome.
  • KepaArg

    Posts: 1721

    Dec 24, 2010 10:26 AM GMT
    it missed the 50th state
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    Dec 24, 2010 10:37 AM GMT
    I pretty much knew this already: its very clear from the US placenames:

    everything from "Lousiane" to "Michigan" uses french spellings for the names (missouri, mississippi, detroit, chicago) seen in the pronunciation of "ch" as "shhh"

    Everything on the East Coast uses english names, New york, Boston, Virginia, Carolina, Georgia... cept for Florida (Spanish for "flowered")

    Everything on the west coast and the south uses spanish words and names (las Vegas, San Diego, Los Angeles etc)
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    Dec 24, 2010 11:25 AM GMT
    your lil animation map forgot the time when mine and others ancestors ruled this land. before we were beaten back and almost killed off, for the white man's greedy gain.

    RE00620315.jpg
    This is all were left with. Even then our reservations are under federal government control.
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    Dec 24, 2010 11:49 AM GMT
    karate_rob saidyour lil animation map forgot the time when mine and others ancestors ruled this land. before we were beaten back and almost killed off, for the white man's greedy gain.

    RE00620315.jpg
    This is all were left with. Even then our reservations are under federal government control.


    I was actually thinking the same thing lol...

    Though I have to admit the Spanish and French were pretty good at mixing in with the natives... Vast majority of Latinos have mostly native blood.. thats mediteranean for you
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    Dec 24, 2010 2:09 PM GMT
    karate_rob saidyour lil animation map forgot the time when mine and others ancestors ruled this land. before we were beaten back and almost killed off, for the white man's greedy gain.

    RE00620315.jpg
    This is all were left with. Even then our reservations are under federal government control.


    just about to post this!
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    Dec 24, 2010 2:35 PM GMT
    brilliant!
  • conservativej...

    Posts: 2465

    Dec 24, 2010 3:22 PM GMT
    Reminds me of history class at Fairmont High School -- of which I did not attend thank God. icon_cool.gif
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    Dec 24, 2010 3:31 PM GMT
    amar_m saidI pretty much knew this already: its very clear from the US placenames:

    everything from "Lousiane" to "Michigan" uses french spellings for the names (missouri, mississippi, detroit, chicago) seen in the pronunciation of "ch" as "shhh"

    Everything on the East Coast uses english names, New york, Boston, Virginia, Carolina, Georgia... cept for Florida (Spanish for "flowered")

    Everything on the west coast and the south uses spanish words and names (las Vegas, San Diego, Los Angeles etc)

    Mostly true on the state level, but lots of exceptions on the local. Parts of the Northeast use many Dutch names for towns, geographic features & locales (this timeline only goes back to 1750). The upper Midwest has a lot of German and Scandinavian names. And Native American names are everywhere, though typically as modified through a European language.

    I wish I could have stopped the animation to study it more closely. Is there a way to do that?
  • ShanksE

    Posts: 263

    Dec 24, 2010 3:38 PM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    amar_m saidI pretty much knew this already: its very clear from the US placenames:

    everything from "Lousiane" to "Michigan" uses french spellings for the names (missouri, mississippi, detroit, chicago) seen in the pronunciation of "ch" as "shhh"

    Everything on the East Coast uses english names, New york, Boston, Virginia, Carolina, Georgia... cept for Florida (Spanish for "flowered")

    Everything on the west coast and the south uses spanish words and names (las Vegas, San Diego, Los Angeles etc)

    Mostly true on the state level, but lots of exceptions on the local. Parts of the Northeast use many Dutch names for towns, geographic features & locales (this timeline only goes back to 1750). The upper Midwest has a lot of German and Scandinavian names. And Native American names are everywhere, though typically as modified through a European language.

    I wish I could have stopped the animation to study it more closely. Is there a way to do that?


    Ditto, can you please share the links to both the maps. A couple of my friends are geography teachers who would find this very interesting to share with their students. I'd be much obliged if you could kindly send me the link.
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    Dec 24, 2010 3:44 PM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    amar_m saidI pretty much knew this already: its very clear from the US placenames:

    everything from "Lousiane" to "Michigan" uses french spellings for the names (missouri, mississippi, detroit, chicago) seen in the pronunciation of "ch" as "shhh"

    Everything on the East Coast uses english names, New york, Boston, Virginia, Carolina, Georgia... cept for Florida (Spanish for "flowered")

    Everything on the west coast and the south uses spanish words and names (las Vegas, San Diego, Los Angeles etc)

    Mostly true on the state level, but lots of exceptions on the local. Parts of the Northeast use many Dutch names for towns, geographic features & locales (this timeline only goes back to 1750). The upper Midwest has a lot of German and Scandinavian names. And Native American names are everywhere, though typically as modified through a European language.

    I wish I could have stopped the animation to study it more closely. Is there a way to do that?


    Actually, the native american names are transcribed in the languages of the colonisers...

    compare "missouri" to "texas" which are both native terms, one transcribved in french, the other in spanish
  • Lozzano

    Posts: 526

    Dec 24, 2010 4:16 PM GMT
    Amazing!
  • swimbikerun

    Posts: 2835

    Dec 24, 2010 5:16 PM GMT
    Lozzano saidAmazing!
    Thanks! It is interesting how fluid nation building has been and not so monolithic as I thought...
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    Dec 24, 2010 5:26 PM GMT
    swimbikerun said
    Lozzano saidAmazing!
    Thanks! It is interesting how fluid nation building has been and not so monolithic as I thought...


    You mean like this:
    funny-jesusland-shirt.gif
    or this?
    postbush.jpg
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    Dec 24, 2010 5:43 PM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle said
    amar_m said
    everything from "Lousiane" to "Michigan" uses french spellings for the names (missouri, mississippi, detroit, chicago) seen in the pronunciation of "ch" as "shhh"


    The spelling for Chicago as we have it today is the anglicized version of the native American word "shikaakwa" from the Potawatomi tribe. The word meant wild leek/skunk smell.

    Illinois is very French and has a silent "S" at the end like Francois. Des Moines is also very French. Both "S"s are not pronounced in that name either.

    The word "Michigan" is from an Algonquian Chippewa Indian word "meicigama" that means "big sea water." Michigan is an anglicized version of a native American word.

    The name Mississippi is derived from the Ojibwe word misi-ziibi ("Great River") or gichi-ziibi ("Big River") at its headwaters."

    Detroit is a French word. Détroit, I believe, is the French spelling.

    Florida, or La Florida is Spanish and comes from Pascua Florida which is Feast of Flowers which honors the sacred holiday of Easter and was named by Ponce de León.


    Almost correct... except that Michigan and Chicago are not "anglicised", but French versions... which is why we pronounce the "ch" as "sh".. extra hint: they are in the same areas as french "detroit" and "illinois"
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    Dec 24, 2010 6:18 PM GMT
    Amar's right, as in chic, Chirac, chinois, chimie, chien.
    If they were truly anglicized it would have been Shicago and Mishigan.

    Des Moines, Detroit and Illinois should have a w- sound so we're all mispronouncing them.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IllinoisIn fact the name "Illinois" derives from the Miami-Illinois verb irenwe·wa "he speaks the regular way". This was then taken into the Ojibwe language, perhaps in the Ottawa dialect, and modified into ilinwe· (pluralized as ilinwe·k). These forms were then borrowed into French, where the /we/ ending acquired the spelling -ois.
  • danielek

    Posts: 124

    Dec 24, 2010 7:52 PM GMT
    Very interesting animation icon_smile.gif
  • neosyllogy

    Posts: 1714

    Dec 24, 2010 7:55 PM GMT
    That would be cool if the slider were interactive, as it is my attention span isn't long enough to follow a slow-ass gif.
    Nice idea though.
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    Dec 24, 2010 7:58 PM GMT
    q1w2e3 said
    Des Moines, Detroit and Illinois should have a w- sound so we're all mispronouncing them.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IllinoisIn fact the name "Illinois" derives from the Miami-Illinois verb irenwe·wa "he speaks the regular way". This was then taken into the Ojibwe language, perhaps in the Ottawa dialect, and modified into ilinwe· (pluralized as ilinwe·k). These forms were then borrowed into French, where the /we/ ending acquired the spelling -ois.


    That illustrates an extra point about colonial french: the modern pronunciation of "oi" = /wa/, but in colonial times, the french pronounced it /we/... exactly in keeping with the native american transcriptions