Starting out: what build to go for?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 31, 2010 9:51 AM GMT
    Hey guys,

    I'm looking to start a more disciplined and focused workout schedule/plan but not exactly sure what sort of build to go for. I read that genetics plays a roll along with stress and sleeping habits. I'm not an athlete but I have noticed the benefits of physical activity with regards to focus in other areas such as work or studies.

    So I'm just wondering where to begin and how to figure out exactly what my desired build should be.

    Ideally, I would like to go for a slimmer look with some muscle build and definition but not sure if I have the right body type.

    Currently, I do a lot of walking, I run on the machines, do bis and tris with dumbbells, and some push ups. As I research though I am finding out very quickly this may not be enough so I am working on developing a better plan.
    My original goal was to lose weight which I have accomplished but now I am looking to build and tone.

    Thanks icon_biggrin.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 31, 2010 10:29 AM GMT
    OK.

    (1) Concentrate on developing a whole body routine (including legs, back etc). Learn what each exercise is meant to work and make sure you feel the work in the right place (ie bench press in the pecs, not the delts). You may need to use less weight than your ego likes

    (2) concentrate on balanced development

    (3) learn about diet and how to eat

    (4) Start off trying to get BIG. You won´t do this by accident, don´t worry. It´s not possible. Keep riding that train until you get to a place you like on your own body and get off. It may take 5 years of consistent work.

    (5) Be disciplined and regular. that is what makes the difference.
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    Dec 31, 2010 11:25 AM GMT
    Lostboy saidOK.

    (1) Concentrate on developing a whole body routine (including legs, back etc). Learn what each exercise is meant to work and make sure you feel the work in the right place (ie bench press in the pecs, not the delts). You may need to use less weight than your ego likes

    (2) concentrate on balanced development

    (3) learn about diet and how to eat

    (4) Start off trying to get BIG. You won´t do this by accident, don´t worry. It´s not possible. Keep riding that train until you get to a place you like on your own body and get off. It may take 5 years of consistent work.

    (5) Be disciplined and regular. that is what makes the difference.


    Firstly, thanks Lostboy for replying icon_smile.gif
    I am still researching target areas and techniques so I will keep 1 and 2 in mind. I eat healthily but not sure if my proportions are alright (more or less) and am starting to figure out combinations of foods.

    My main question is for 4 which is just how much cardio should I work in at the beginning?

    Thanks again for the feedback!
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    Dec 31, 2010 1:29 PM GMT
    cardio... depends (1) how much you like it, (2) lifestyle/work activities (if you are physically active all day you don´t really need to do extra cardio), (3) how you do your lifting.


    If you enjoy cardio and don´t want to give it up, then do it. If you are totally sedentary then you need to build some aerobic activity into your life, one way is through gym cardio. If you do circuits then you don´t need cardio so much...

    If you want to "get big" then do less. If you want to get "athletic" you can do more. There is no rule, apart from the basic fact that you need to be doing aerobic activity on a daily basis.
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    Dec 31, 2010 4:16 PM GMT
    Lostboy said There is no rule, apart from the basic fact that you need to be doing aerobic activity on a daily basis.


    I do enjoy cardio but I am not sure if I am pushing it too much.
    I have been using the machines for 45 minutes almost every day and usually feel great afterwards, just not sure if that's a little much.
    Would it be better to shorten the time and increase the resistance?

    It's important for me cause, aside from walking to/from campus and in-between classes most days, I am sitting.
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    Dec 31, 2010 4:19 PM GMT
    well at least you walk... many people in america don´t even do that. You don´t need 45 mins a day. They recommend 30 mins 3 times a week for health.. doing that much running each day will work against muscle gains.

    If you want to shorten the time, consider interval training (aka HIIT)

    You chose icon_smile.gif
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    Dec 31, 2010 4:25 PM GMT
    You're already skinny, and, unless you change your ways, you'll stay that way or get skinnier. That's reality.

    Built folks don't get built by magic. It takes calories. It takes smart training. It takes recovery. It take time (months and years).

    You're in NO danger of becoming built any day soon.

    Resistance training is the ONLY training that will increase your lean muscle mass AS YOU GROW OLDER. Every pound of lean muscle burns calories, even at rest, and...it's the ONLY way to increase your base metabolism AS YOU GROW OLDER.

    Resistance training also is the only form of training that will strengthen your bones AS YOU GROW OLDER. Impact exercises like running cause impact damage and RUIN your skeletal system. Humans were really only designed to run short distances in the gathering of food.

    Resistance training is BY FAR superior for increasing insulin sensitivity and is BY FAR superior for increasing glucose tolerance.

    HIIT is vastly superior for increasing your cardiac threshold and is much more effective for fat burning.

    Anyone telling you all that you need to do is cardio has no clue about what they're talking about.

    If you want to get bigger, you eat more, recover, and train with more volume. If you want to get smaller, you eat less, and train less. That works universally. It's not at all complicated.

    "Abs" are a function of body fat percentage. To stay lean, do HIIT 12 to 20 minutes daily, eat small meals often, and stay at it. You'll get lean, eventually.
  • Celticmusl

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    Dec 31, 2010 4:31 PM GMT
    You don't choose your build, your build chooses you.



    .....zen, right?
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    Dec 31, 2010 4:32 PM GMT
    Celticmusl saidYou don't choose your build, your build chooses you.


    That's what the fat chick in the fat cart at walmart said.
  • Celticmusl

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    Dec 31, 2010 4:34 PM GMT
    flex89 said
    Celticmusl saidYou don't choose your build, your build chooses you.


    That's what the fat chick in the fat cart at walmart said.



    Well I didn't choose looking like a hairy walrus so there you go...
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    Dec 31, 2010 4:35 PM GMT
    Celticmusl said
    flex89 said
    Celticmusl saidYou don't choose your build, your build chooses you.


    That's what the fat chick in the fat cart at walmart said.



    Well I didn't choose looking like a hairy walrus so there you go...


    That's what shaving powder's for icon_wink.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 31, 2010 4:39 PM GMT
    Celticmusl saidYou don't choose your build, your build chooses you.

    .....zen, right?


    Flex is mostly right.

    While an ectomorph won't change their small bones and tendency to be skinny, they can become more mesomorphic.

    While an endomorph can't change their large bone structure and heavier features, they don't have to be fat asses.

    Some folks, like me, are VERY mesomorphic. I walk by a weight room and get bigger (joking). I weighed 175 in high school. Even if I didn't work out, I'd still be a mesomorph, partly because that's my natural type, and also because I've been lifting for 35 years.

    A few folks have exceptional genes, with great "lines", and the ability to recover from particular physical activities in a particular way. Those guys are the exceptional bodybuilders, and the Lance Armstrongs, and Michael Phelps, of The World, Phelps has a disease that affects his long bones and recovery, and he leverages his badly balanced body and his disease to make him good at swimming...that..and lots of work..and good coaching. Phelps made lemons from lemonade. My heart has a bigger stroke than most folks because of 35 years of lifting. It's called athletic heart syndrome. Lance Armstrong's heart can deliver 3 TIMES as much blood as a sedentary person with each stroke.

    However, all the aforementioned being said, just because you're an endo it does not give you license to be 100 pounds overweight.

    Most Americans are too lazy to research training method, and, even more lack the consistency and discipline to execute a plan to a goal for fitness. They're simply too lazy.

    In the U.S., the only developed country in The World without universal health care, we have a pandemic of obesity, costing nearly 2.5 MILLION lives annually and HUGE, HUGE, HUGE, health care costs (Nearing 20% of GNP where regular countries are around 10% GNP.). All other causes of premature death are far, far, behind. By 2020, fully 1/3 of all Americans will suffer from type 2 diabetes. Folks have to eat right, we need early intervention / education / universal health care, and folks have to get up and get moving.
  • Celticmusl

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    Dec 31, 2010 4:44 PM GMT
    Honestly I do think a zen approach to it is good. I was in college and a 143 lbs before I started working out. I wasnt going for a big look at all...but my arms and legs just kept getting bigger, etc.
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    Dec 31, 2010 4:46 PM GMT
    Celticmusl saidHonestly I do think a zen approach to it is good. I was in college and a 143 lbs before I started working out. I wasnt going for a big look at all...but my arms and legs just kept getting bigger, etc.


    That has nothing to do with "zen." That's about you consuming more calories than you burned and you gained weight.

    Where you were underweight previously, your body later had proper calories and fixed itself to a more natural set point.
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    Dec 31, 2010 5:54 PM GMT
    chuckystud said
    Celticmusl saidHonestly I do think a zen approach to it is good. I was in college and a 143 lbs before I started working out. I wasnt going for a big look at all...but my arms and legs just kept getting bigger, etc.


    That has nothing to do with "zen." That's about you consuming more calories than you burned and you gained weight.

    Where you were underweight previously, your body later had proper calories and fixed itself to a more natural set point.


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    Dec 31, 2010 6:05 PM GMT
    Can I ask a question?

    Is it possible that the object is not to aim for a particular type, but to discover what you get when you start to make the changes in your life and activities to bring about a change? I mean, I started getting a lt happier with my results when I stopped trying to look LIKE someone else. Now, don't get me wrong, there are men on this site (and elsewhere) who have physiques I'd like to have, but they serve more as an inspiration to work hard so I can unlock whatever it is that I have....

    Does that make any sense or am I looking at it the "wrong way?"

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    Dec 31, 2010 6:28 PM GMT
    I think so.
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    Dec 31, 2010 7:48 PM GMT
    SAHEM62896 saidCan I ask a question?

    Is it possible that the object is not to aim for a particular type, but to discover what you get when you start to make the changes in your life and activities to bring about a change? I mean, I started getting a lt happier with my results when I stopped trying to look LIKE someone else. Now, don't get me wrong, there are men on this site (and elsewhere) who have physiques I'd like to have, but they serve more as an inspiration to work hard so I can unlock whatever it is that I have....

    Does that make any sense or am I looking at it the "wrong way?"



    You will be happiest when you can get a mind ideal which is close to your genetic potential... some people always want to be bigger (often to compensate for other areas of their life or physique) who end up looking god awful. That´s what I meant when I said aim to get muscle and then get off the train when you see a station you like.

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    Jan 01, 2011 12:07 AM GMT
    Lostboy said
    SAHEM62896 saidCan I ask a question?

    Is it possible that the object is not to aim for a particular type, but to discover what you get when you start to make the changes in your life and activities to bring about a change? I mean, I started getting a lt happier with my results when I stopped trying to look LIKE someone else. Now, don't get me wrong, there are men on this site (and elsewhere) who have physiques I'd like to have, but they serve more as an inspiration to work hard so I can unlock whatever it is that I have....

    Does that make any sense or am I looking at it the "wrong way?"



    You will be happiest when you can get a mind ideal which is close to your genetic potential... some people always want to be bigger (often to compensate for other areas of their life or physique) who end up looking god awful. That´s what I meant when I said aim to get muscle and then get off the train when you see a station you like.



    I completely agree with you all. GREAT comments from chuckystud. I've accepted that I'm never going to have the buff, perfectly shaped muscled body that I idolized for so long growing up. I thought, I'm gay. There HAS to be a way to look like that! Yeah, that never happened. I like when Sahem talks about making changes. I so agree. For me, it was cutting waaaay back on trips to the donut shop and fast food joints. I'd take 2 steps forward (with training) and 3 steps back with nutrition. I was wasting my time. Since having a better diet, I've lost some weight and decided to be serious about tennis, which is a sport I truly love and is great exercise (I HATE doing cardio at the gym) and now that my advanced degree is finished, I plan to make it to the gym at least 3 days/wk. Staying away from Wendy's and McD's wasn't as hard as I thought it would be, and I have a routine for the types of products I buy at the grocery store. I cheat at holidays, but not too much, so that I don't have to completely start from scratch. I think that when you find something that works, you're just that much more likely to respect the progress you made, and work to preserve it.
  • Celticmusl

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    Jan 01, 2011 12:19 AM GMT
    SAHEM62896 saidCan I ask a question?

    Is it possible that the object is not to aim for a particular type, but to discover what you get when you start to make the changes in your life and activities to bring about a change? I mean, I started getting a lt happier with my results when I stopped trying to look LIKE someone else. Now, don't get me wrong, there are men on this site (and elsewhere) who have physiques I'd like to have, but they serve more as an inspiration to work hard so I can unlock whatever it is that I have....

    Does that make any sense or am I looking at it the "wrong way?"




    That's pretty much my "zen" take on it. Zen is somewhat a philosophy which has to do with a meditative state. The state of "zen" has to do with actualization. What you actualize or achieve might not be exactly the outcome of what you desire, but sometimes your achievement is better than what you desired in the first place.
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    Jan 01, 2011 9:27 AM GMT
    Thanks guys for all the comments and suggestions!

    It sounds like I am doing a bit too much running, seeing as I am not a professional athlete trying to compete. I try to walk everywhere (smaller city) instead of driving so I guess that also does a lot.
    Based on the comments here and some of the comments in the other forums, it seems like my main problem is I need to change up the routine a bit and cut back on some time while adding a little more resistance.
    It also seems like time will tell how my body will build in regards to what my genetics wish to form to which actually does sound like a "zen" approach might be a good philosophy to have (to be patient). Is that right?

    Thankfully I haven't injured myself yet so for the new years, I will make some changes. As far as my diet goes, I do eat healthy and am trying to track my nutrition nowadays for good food proportions.
    I get the feeling though starting this stuff in my mid twenties might give me a little bit of a disadvantage compared to say someone who has been very physically active since their teens? I dunno.

    "That´s what I meant when I said aim to get muscle and then get off the train when you see a station you like. "

    I think I will start here. In regards to finding a "particular body type," I just wasn't sure how much genetics played into it.

    "Is it possible that the object is not to aim for a particular type, but to discover what you get when you start to make the changes in your life and activities to bring about a change?"

    I guess my overall goal in regards to what I seek from training is that I have noticed just with what I have been doing that I feel a lot better than back when I didn't care about working out at all. It's become a way for me to take a break from studying and other stress areas and to sweat it out a little; it's almost meditative. I started realizing recently that my energy levels could use a little improvement, thus I am here sorting out how to improve.

    I do have a couple more questions (I'm sure I'll think of more but you guys are being awesome just answering what I've already presented so I will try not to push my luck too far).

    As far as my diet goes, I have cut back a lot of the empty kcal sugar intake; don't drink soda, I don't eat candy (except a little around holidays or birthdays), etc. I also don't eat fast food but once in awhile I will have like some pizza or something else with cheese (it's my weakness). I switch up my fruits and veggies pretty well and I get protein from mostly beans, nuts, and lean meats (have cut out red meat and pork completely). I try to incorporate HDL fats.
    With all of that said...
    I noticed that some guys do the shakes (like protein shakes) and I have never really ventured into it. Should I bother?

    Anyhow, I typed out a lot. Thanks again for all the replies! icon_biggrin.gif

    And Happy New Year!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 02, 2011 5:18 AM GMT
    Go for the best build that your genetics will let you have.
    That's the only build you can get anyway. icon_wink.gif