Is 'letting your workout regimen dictate your work schedule' being obsessed OR dedicated?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 02, 2011 11:16 PM GMT
    I was working only part-time for a few weeks, when I found this new job. During the interview, I stressed how I prefer working only from 2pm to 8pm. I didn't tell them that the reason was that I really only like to work out in the morning. The person said that I'd be working from 4pm to 8pm most days and they'll try to fill in the rest of the afternoon. I stressed again & again that I prefer to start after 2pm. Today, I get a call stating that I will start at 10:45am (& work till 8pm). This means that I'll have to wake up before 6am just to get in a descent 2 hour work-out. I wanted to work-out 7 days/week ( 1.5-2 hours/day on average) but now I'll be lucky if I can do 6 days/week. Am I being too critical? Am I obsessed with working out? OR am I dedicated?
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    Jan 02, 2011 11:56 PM GMT
    There's nothing wrong with making your exercise regimen an important part of your life. Just depends how you end up looking at it. It can either be 'omg working out has consumed my life, this is fucked up!', or 'yeah I think working out is important and need to make the proper accommodations'.

    That being said, not having even a single rest day in your workout routine is counterproductive to any fitness goal you may have.
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    Jan 03, 2011 12:20 AM GMT
    sweetyork saidAm I obsessed with working out?
    2 hrs per day, 7 days per week? Fuck yeah you're obsessed.
    Doing that much will destroy any progress you're trying to make.
    The body needs rest. Exercise stimulates and tears the muscles. It's not until you're resting that they have time to rebuild and grow.
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    Jan 03, 2011 2:24 AM GMT
    To be fair, 2 of those days include yoga/stretching and cardio (I don't do weight training every day).
  • danielek

    Posts: 124

    Jan 03, 2011 2:26 AM GMT
    I'd lean toward obsessed. I think work should dictate your workout schedule. But hey, what do I know. The longest I've ever worked out for is an hour, and that's very rare for me.
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    Jan 03, 2011 2:27 AM GMT
    Time management, as well as balance, are things that most folks would do better if they had more.

    If you can schedule your work around your workout, more power to you.

    It's all about priorities. Too much for one person might not be enough for another.

    We all have the same 24 hours in a day. Is 2 hours too much for fitness, and feeling well? Probably not. Are 10 hours days, or 12 hour days, too long? Almost certainly.

    Thinking clearly, if you sleep 7 hours, and work 8 hours, that leaves 9 hours to do other stuff. It's logical to actually DO something during that time.
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    Jan 03, 2011 2:35 AM GMT
    sweetyork saidI was working only part-time for a few weeks, when I found this new job. During the interview, I stressed how I prefer working only from 2pm to 8pm. I didn't tell them that the reason was that I really only like to work out in the morning. The person said that I'd be working from 4pm to 8pm most days and they'll try to fill in the rest of the afternoon. I stressed again & again that I prefer to start after 2pm. Today, I get a call stating that I will start at 10:45am (& work till 8pm). This means that I'll have to wake up before 6am just to get in a descent 2 hour work-out. I wanted to work-out 7 days/week ( 1.5-2 hours/day on average) but now I'll be lucky if I can do 6 days/week. Am I being too critical? Am I obsessed with working out? OR am I dedicated?


    I don't think it's obsession, but if it's making you stressed, then yes it's a problem. Stress is counterproductive to your fitness goals, as well as a lot of other things in life. So try your best to make the 2 (work and working out) work together so that you aren't feeling stressed all the time! Try getting up earlier for a while, or even working out late at night, while you are just starting out at this new job, and maybe after a while you will have more pull to get the shifts you really want.
  • UnluckyTitan

    Posts: 106

    Jan 03, 2011 4:11 AM GMT
    I'm gonna go with obsessed too, if it were dedication you wouldn't be bitching about having to get up at 6 to get your workout in. If it's really that big of a deal you can always work out after work or do an hour in the AM then another hour in the PM.
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    Jan 03, 2011 4:55 AM GMT
    chuckystud saidTime management, as well as balance, are things that most folks would do better if they had more.
    We all have the same 24 hours in a day. Is 2 hours too much for fitness, and feeling well? Probably not.


    I agree with this. I don't think 2 hours per day, as long as it includes variety, for workout or stretching or running is not excessive for a committed athlete.

    I also agree that it's a time management issue...I need about 7 hours sleep...and that leaves 17 hours for work, workout, social stuff. That's plenty of time, guys.

    And if you can schedule your work hours to accommodate your training, all the more power to you.
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    Jan 03, 2011 4:59 AM GMT
    sweetyork said Am I obsessed with working out? OR am I dedicated?


    Dedicated. Just make sure you don't lose sight of the paying work not just the "fun" work.

  • Jessie_Lee

    Posts: 113

    Jan 03, 2011 3:54 PM GMT
    Obsessed. Your body needs rest. If you don't feel like you're working out hard enough, just push yourself harder in the limited time you have. You can push yourself by using supersets, less rest between sets, or try more difficult exercises. Maybe heavier weight if you can achieve it SAFELY.

    Even though exercise is very important, it shouldn't take the highest priority.
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    Jan 03, 2011 4:12 PM GMT
    I don't think the issue you're presenting is whether you doing to be able to workout 7 days a week for 2 hours at a time, but rather, the fact that you're upset you're not going to be able to do it in the morning every day. The fact that you're going to miss a workout (thus bringing you down to 6 days a week) merely on the fact that you cannot work out at your chosen time of the day (i.e. morning) and that this fact causes you stress points to obsession. From what you've written, you would rather NOT workout AT ALL, rather than workout at any other time of the day than the morning.

    I don't think we can really comment on whether working out 7 days a week is appropriate or not, given we have no idea what you're doing. I used to train 12 workouts a week when I was rowing varsity (AM/PM M-F, and AM Sat+Sun), so who's to say it's "unhealthy"?

    But I'm curious as to why your workout time is so inflexible that you would rather not do a workout at all, then just work out after your job shift is over?
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    Jan 03, 2011 4:15 PM GMT
    Seriously, you're obsessed. You're lucky though you get to work around your work schedule.
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    Jan 04, 2011 3:32 AM GMT
    bryanc_74 saidBut I'm curious as to why your workout time is so inflexible that you would rather not do a workout at all, then just work out after your job shift is over?


    My workout time is 'flexible' in the sense that no matter how bad my work schedule gets, I'll make time for working out 6 days/wk. But, when this situation arouse, I wondered whether I was being obsessed that I couldn't let go of working out one day (the 7th day of the week). I always wondered whether to achieve the kind of body I truly want, I would have to give priority to working out above everything else.
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    Jan 04, 2011 1:06 PM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidI think two hours everyday is too much.

    I think five to seven hours a week is good amount of time to keep in shape. This includes fat burning and resistance weight training, stretching, everything.

    Respectfully, I think you are being obsessed.


    This. I am very committed to training, but sometimes it has to give way. We train to live. Your problem is not your hours (though, again, not sure that they are necessary). It´s how flappy you get when your workouts are threatened (which in this case means you have to do it earlier or shorter). You should have a day off a week. More is not better.
  • MuscleComeBac...

    Posts: 2376

    Jan 04, 2011 1:31 PM GMT
    You've lost perspective on how to have what it is that you need.

    Balance.

    I don't think obsession is a bad thing until it compromises your ability to find joy in your obsession. Depending on how your're training, two hours is not necessarily too much, but that's entirely dependent upon what you do in that time, how much rest you get, how you eat, and what your goals are.

    What you have to decide is what you sacrifice in exchange. If getting up early is required, then you have to get to bed sooner, so you're going to have to give up some time elsewhere to get the workouts in that you want.

    You need your work to pay for living expenses, at the very least. That takes pressure off of you and lowers stress. Without it, your workouts will suffer a great deal more than if you have to start them two hours earlier than previous schedules have permitted.

    If your workouts are preventing you from earning a living - then you've crossed a line, and you need to re-evaluate your approach to training.

    Dedication is a good thing, so long as it keeps you happy. When you become unhappy, you've lost control and you've lost value and nothing is worth that.
    Nothing.
  • bad_wolf

    Posts: 1002

    Jan 04, 2011 1:32 PM GMT
    Dedicated. I feel nothing towards my job, it's a means to an end. Money. Bodybuilding is something I want to do and do well in. So work can side lined if I want it to.
  • MuscleComeBac...

    Posts: 2376

    Jan 04, 2011 1:43 PM GMT
    bad_wolf saidDedicated. I feel nothing towards my job, it's a means to an end. Money. Bodybuilding is something I want to do and do well in. So work can side lined if I want it to.


    I get this. I SO get this. BUT, your bodybuilding will become impossible if you don't facilitate your lifestyle, and unless you're on the dole as the heir to a great fortune, or a trust-fund NPC competitor, it's kinda' hard to support a good bodybuilding lifestyle without a job.

    The OP's issue is really the a.m. preference. He has to either teach his body how to adjust to a later workout, or sacrifice time at the end of the day and get to bed sooner to get the rest required and get up earlier for his workouts. OR, get another job.

    A job is INDEED a means to an end. Without the job, there is no means, and thus no end in sight.....
  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16311

    Jan 04, 2011 1:48 PM GMT
    I understand how important a workout schedule is to those of us who are dedicated. This week I have client appointments and other responsibilities during my usual workout times (from today, Tuesday through the rest of the week). I hate it, but I'll work out at other times.

    Your job is the way you support yourself... it has to rule.. adapt your workout around your work schedule. That's the way it has to be. If you get a chance to reduce your work to 2-8 p.m., encourage it if thats what you want, but at this point you need the job (I assume), don't put unfair demands on your new employer, making bad impressions.