Questions about cooking mushrooms.

  • ShanksE

    Posts: 263

    Jan 03, 2011 3:53 AM GMT
    I cooked mushrooms for the first time today and I just had a couple of queries about it. I prepared it in the Indian style (with spices and garnishing similar to what I use for other vegetables), but I wanted to know a couple of basics about cooking them:

    1. How long must they be washed/rinsed before preparing?
    2. Do they lose their nutritive value if they are boiled for long?
    3. Are there any food items that are taboo when having mushrooms? for instance beet and pulses are not to be eaten together as they reduce the nutritive value of the other. Are there similar 'negative foods' for mushrooms?

    Oh and I'm not sure what mushrooms I made, I just picked up small brown colour mushrooms at Farmer's market.

    Suggestions/recipes invited. Thanks.
  • ShanksE

    Posts: 263

    Jan 03, 2011 1:12 PM GMT
    Hey thanks! That was really helpful!
    I'll definitely look these sites up! icon_smile.gif
  • ShanksE

    Posts: 263

    Jan 04, 2011 1:43 AM GMT
    yourname2000 saidHeyo,

    Not a nutritionist or anything, but my understanding is:

    1. best not to 'wash' them per se...they soak up water very easily. You can just wipe them with a damp cloth...apparently, it is a good idea to wipe them though (as opposed to not cleaning them at all) because they are still living and expelling stuff, and hey...they're grown in shit...so yeah.


    I did notice that they soak up a lot of water even when cooking, but all day today I was very, very thirsty. Do you have to increase your water intake when eating mushrooms?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 06, 2011 4:29 PM GMT
    Try this cookbook:

    http://www.amazon.ca/Mushroom-Lovers-Cookbook-Primer/dp/076110660X

    Different types of mushrooms are cooked different ways, as some are more delicate than others (ie. portabello vs. oyster mushrooms)

    The small brown mushrooms (cremini) are actually just baby portabello mushrooms.

    One of my favourite ways to cook heartier mushrooms (cremini, portabello) is to grill, or even roast them. This removes a lot of the water in them, and intensifies the flavour.
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    Jan 16, 2011 12:02 AM GMT
    ShanksE saidI cooked mushrooms for the first time today and I just had a couple of queries about it. I prepared it in the Indian style (with spices and garnishing similar to what I use for other vegetables), but I wanted to know a couple of basics about cooking them:

    1. How long must they be washed/rinsed before preparing?
    2. Do they lose their nutritive value if they are boiled for long?
    3. Are there any food items that are taboo when having mushrooms? for instance beet and pulses are not to be eaten together as they reduce the nutritive value of the other. Are there similar 'negative foods' for mushrooms?

    Oh and I'm not sure what mushrooms I made, I just picked up small brown colour mushrooms at Farmer's market.

    Suggestions/recipes invited. Thanks.



    I cook all the time... Highly proficient at it too.


    Now here are your answers...


    1. It is okay to wash mushrooms. They do not absorb as much water as people think.., All you need is a large bowel of water, throw the mushrooms in in them toss em around in the water for a bit, and let the dirt settle to the bottom (Method of Jacque Pepin). Now put them in the colander and rinse to get any access dirt off. The wipe down method with a wet towel does not ensure you get all the dirt off... But a lot of supermarkets these days have prepackaged already cleaned mushrooms.


    2. I never boil mushrooms.. Unless you use them in soup... best to saute, broil, roast, grill and bake.

    3. No. Other foods don't cancel one another out... Unless you put them in cream, if your trying to be healthy... Cream kills anything nutritional you want in your body but Cream is so awesome...




    By the way, if anything mushrooms loose liquid as they cook. They shrink dramatically...


    I prefer making stuffed mushrooms... I have a couple of methods for that.. I do a diced steak stuffed mushroom, or standard bread stuffing... Or a cheese stuffing... Just don't use cream cheese (to cliche and disgusting) use a sharp cheddar... Or you can take your colour of mushrooms and make a nice sauce with it for pasta... Use wine, broth and cream


    I'm a little late for this thread, but I wanted to get my thoughts out there.







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    Jan 16, 2011 12:10 AM GMT
    ShanksE saidI cooked mushrooms for the first time today and I just had a couple of queries about it.

    And a few question for you. My partner is a wonderful cook of mushrooms, and I've even cooked them myself, despite being the worst cook the world has ever known.

    - what kind of mushrooms?
    - what do you want to do with them? Mix them into something, make a side-dish, stuff them, make hors d'oeuvres, smoother a steak with them, sautè, have a soup?

    I love mushrooms, simply eat them raw. Usually a rinse in cold water is enough to clean them in the US, but honestly I don't know what kind you find in India. And if they're known by the same English names we use in the US. Or if you're currently in Newark, Delaware (where I once was on my honeymoon trip), then we're talking the same words, and the same stuff is likely available.
  • morphology

    Posts: 12

    Jan 16, 2011 12:19 AM GMT
    Iv never heard of negative food combos, sounds like an old wives tale, btw what are "pulses" is that a typo?
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    Jan 16, 2011 12:26 AM GMT
    morphology saidIv never heard of negative food combos, sounds like an old wives tale, btw what are "pulses" is that a typo?


    a pulse refers to LEGUMES
  • ShanksE

    Posts: 263

    Jan 22, 2011 4:57 AM GMT
    DragonDevil said
    ShanksE saidI cooked mushrooms for the first time today and I just had a couple of queries about it. I prepared it in the Indian style (with spices and garnishing similar to what I use for other vegetables), but I wanted to know a couple of basics about cooking them:

    1. How long must they be washed/rinsed before preparing?
    2. Do they lose their nutritive value if they are boiled for long?
    3. Are there any food items that are taboo when having mushrooms? for instance beet and pulses are not to be eaten together as they reduce the nutritive value of the other. Are there similar 'negative foods' for mushrooms?

    Oh and I'm not sure what mushrooms I made, I just picked up small brown colour mushrooms at Farmer's market.

    Suggestions/recipes invited. Thanks.



    I cook all the time... Highly proficient at it too.


    Now here are your answers...


    1. It is okay to wash mushrooms. They do not absorb as much water as people think.., All you need is a large bowel of water, throw the mushrooms in in them toss em around in the water for a bit, and let the dirt settle to the bottom (Method of Jacque Pepin). Now put them in the colander and rinse to get any access dirt off. The wipe down method with a wet towel does not ensure you get all the dirt off... But a lot of supermarkets these days have prepackaged already cleaned mushrooms.


    2. I never boil mushrooms.. Unless you use them in soup... best to saute, broil, roast, grill and bake.

    3. No. Other foods don't cancel one another out... Unless you put them in cream, if your trying to be healthy... Cream kills anything nutritional you want in your body but Cream is so awesome...




    By the way, if anything mushrooms loose liquid as they cook. They shrink dramatically...


    I prefer making stuffed mushrooms... I have a couple of methods for that.. I do a diced steak stuffed mushroom, or standard bread stuffing... Or a cheese stuffing... Just don't use cream cheese (to cliche and disgusting) use a sharp cheddar... Or you can take your colour of mushrooms and make a nice sauce with it for pasta... Use wine, broth and cream


    I'm a little late for this thread, but I wanted to get my thoughts out there.



    Hey. Thanks for your post. I'm sorry, but I hadn't checked in a while, My bad. icon_smile.gif
    Do write in with your recipe for making stuffed mushrooms. It sounds interesting! icon_smile.gif
  • ShanksE

    Posts: 263

    Jan 22, 2011 5:02 AM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    ShanksE saidI cooked mushrooms for the first time today and I just had a couple of queries about it.

    And a few question for you. My partner is a wonderful cook of mushrooms, and I've even cooked them myself, despite being the worst cook the world has ever known.

    - what kind of mushrooms?
    - what do you want to do with them? Mix them into something, make a side-dish, stuff them, make hors d'oeuvres, smoother a steak with them, sautè, have a soup?

    I love mushrooms, simply eat them raw. Usually a rinse in cold water is enough to clean them in the US, but honestly I don't know what kind you find in India. And if they're known by the same English names we use in the US. Or if you're currently in Newark, Delaware (where I once was on my honeymoon trip), then we're talking the same words, and the same stuff is likely available.


    The thing is we don't cook a lot of mushrooms back home in India, at least not in my family. It is considered as an 'unclean' food, and is not very commonly consumed. Also when I make them, I want them as a side dish, something I can eat with the Indian 'roti' (similar to a pita bread, only thinner).

    One last question though, albeit it is a bit personal. You mentioned you came to Newark, DE for a honeymoon??? I mean, really? WHY? There is nothing here except for the Uni! I surely didn't think of Newark as a honeymoon town! icon_smile.gif
  • ShanksE

    Posts: 263

    Jan 22, 2011 5:07 AM GMT
    morphology saidIv never heard of negative food combos, sounds like an old wives tale, btw what are "pulses" is that a typo?

    Beet and legumes (also known as pulses, no that wasn't a typo :p)
    Dairy and citrus products.
    Fruits and milk.

    These are some examples of negative food combos that do not agree with each other. Each takes off the nutritional value of the other. I'm not sure that they are old wives' tales because I remember reading an article about it some time back.