One Gram of Protein for Every Pound of Bodyweight.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 05, 2011 3:28 PM GMT
    For those of you who adhere to this philosophy, what's your secret? How do you manage to accomplish this daily?
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    Jan 05, 2011 10:58 PM GMT
    Food budget that exceeds what some people pay for rent.
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    Jan 05, 2011 11:00 PM GMT
    That protein allotment is for every pound of lean body mass, not total body weight. You need to determine your fat percentage, convert it to how many lbs of body fat that is on your frame, subtract it from your total weight and you'll have your lbs of lean body mass.
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    Jan 05, 2011 11:00 PM GMT
    Eat 6 meals a day... lots of meat, and whey protein shakes when you have no time to cook meats.
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    Jan 05, 2011 11:30 PM GMT
    Someone told me, and it may be simply because they're a genetic freak, that as long as you get a huge amount of protein before and especially immediately after the workout.
  • Springer70

    Posts: 65

    Jan 05, 2011 11:30 PM GMT
    This rule is also misquoted a lot. It's not one gram for every pound of bodyweight, it's one gram for every pound of lean body mass. So, for someone that's 200 lbs, there's no need to eat 200g of protein, it will vary by person, but the actual amount is less, and much easier to consume. The previous reply, by multiplying by 0.8 or 0.9 is about right, and is just another way to get to the same answer.

    For most people, frequent meals, or protein shakes throughout the day do the trick. Breakfast-shake-Lunch-shake-dinner-shake, usually is enough, assuming you keep the portion size down (the typical restaurant doles out portions that are IMO double what is needed in this 6-meal a day plan. So, there's no need to stuff your face with heaps of food and gallons of protein shakes. On the contrary, it's a matter of pace and portions.


    Food for thought.
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    Jan 05, 2011 11:51 PM GMT
    It makes my head hurt to look at that.
    Stick with one system of measurement please.

    grams protein per kilogram bodyweight

    or if you must, drams per stone or some other nonsense.


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    Jan 07, 2011 6:17 PM GMT
    Also, keep in mind that the body can process only about 26g of protein at a time.
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    Jan 07, 2011 6:29 PM GMT
    mindgarden saidIt makes my head hurt to look at that.
    Stick with one system of measurement please.

    grams protein per kilogram bodyweight

    or if you must, drams per stone or some other nonsense.


    Welcome to the USA. That's how we do things here. Human bodyweight (on scales, in books and articles, basically everywhere) is measured in English pounds, whereas standard nutrition labels list nutrient quantities using metric units.

    I don't like it any more than you do. I wish everything was metric; it would be so much easier. But this is the way it is for now...
  • coolarmydude

    Posts: 9190

    Jan 07, 2011 6:41 PM GMT
    This thread is right on time for me as I should receive my whey protein powder in the mail any day now and start adding that to my diet for the first time ever.

    The website, bodybuilding.com, says that you should take 1-2 grams of protein per pound of total body weight per day.

    Our dining facility here in Afghanistan has nutrition information posted at the entrance and it suggests for a weightlifter to consume 0.75 grams of protein per pound of total body weight per day. There are two other categories of consumers, sedentary and something else, with 0.35 grams of protein per pound of total body weight per day for the sedentary person. I will recheck that and update here.

    It seems to me that 0.75g/lb/day is more reasonable.
  • coolarmydude

    Posts: 9190

    Jan 07, 2011 7:16 PM GMT
    From the website, WebMD (http://www.webmd.com/diet/guide/high-protein-diet-weight-loss):

    We need protein at all stages of life, for a variety of bodily functions. It's the major component of all cells, including muscle and bone. It's needed for growth, development, and immunity to fight off infections and protect the body.

    The Institute of Health's Dietary Reference Intake (DRI) recommendations allow for a wide range of protein intake - anywhere from 10% to 35% of total calories - for normal, healthy adults. For example, on an 1,800 calorie diet, you could safely consume anywhere from 45 grams (that's 10% of calories) to 218 grams (35%) of protein per day.

    However, the Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) for protein is 56 grams a day for men and 46 grams a day for women. Most Americans have no problem getting this much, but would struggle to take in enough protein to make up 35% of their calories.
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    Jan 08, 2011 1:42 AM GMT
    paulflexes saidFood budget that exceeds what some people pay for rent.

    I second that.
  • Runningrass

    Posts: 80

    Jan 08, 2011 2:00 AM GMT
    averagejoe said
    paulflexes saidFood budget that exceeds what some people pay for rent.

    I second that.


    my food budget is about the same as my rent...and i'm a vegetarian! (i do need to start up w/ protein shakes again though. training everyday probably requires more protein than what i'm getting.)
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    Jan 08, 2011 8:20 PM GMT
    I don't measure food. I just eat. After working out for a while, you're more in tune with how your body reacts to changes in nutrition and exercise. Also, keep in mind that consuming more protein than your body can process will turn into fat. And high protein diets really tax the kidneys. If you're really that concerned about your food intake, talk to a nutritionist.
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    Jan 08, 2011 9:05 PM GMT
    It's a trap.

    I've tried to eat 1 gm/lb of bodyweight, but even when I was at 280 lbs, my body just said "stop" at a point. Listen to your body. It doesn't need that much protein. Sure you have to eat a lot of protein, but 1 gm/lb is too much. I would probably say 1 gm/lb of lean body weight maximum, but any more than that is a waste.

    Just my opinion.
  • mybud

    Posts: 11819

    Jan 08, 2011 9:15 PM GMT
    Well it's not 1 gram per pound per body weight...it's 1 gram a pound after you minus out your body fat percentage...my results have been awesome following this guide...Serious bodybuilders strive for more than 1 gram...some go 2 or 3 grams...but again they're hittin the weights extra hard and are watching their diets like hawks....BUD
  • dive5154

    Posts: 3

    Apr 13, 2011 4:28 PM GMT
    I'm not looking to gain weight rather stay toned and fit. I eat a well balanced diet, and have never done the whole protein thing. What are the benefits of protein shakes? When is the best time to drink one, Before my workout? After my workout? both?

    All of this is new to me. I go to the gym, i drink water, and eat right. Why should I add more protein to my diet?

    Simple explanations would be great please, I had enough of the science and formulas in college. haha.
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    Apr 13, 2011 4:34 PM GMT
    I weigh about 145lbs and was told via my trainer to consume approximately half of the calories I need via carbs and half through protein...which ends up being about 210 grams of carbs and 210 of protein. His justification was I need more calories to build muscle and gain mass. Sounds like he was wrong from what I'm hearin haha.
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    Apr 21, 2011 7:32 PM GMT
    DelisleGuy saidAlso, keep in mind that the body can process only about 26g of protein at a time.

    This seems to be a critical point, so how long should you wait after a meal before you can process more protein?
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    Apr 22, 2011 12:18 AM GMT
    kandsk said
    DelisleGuy saidAlso, keep in mind that the body can process only about 26g of protein at a time.

    This seems to be a critical point, so how long should you wait after a meal before you can process more protein?
    1-3 hours seems to work for me. I start getting hungry if I don't eat something with protein at least every 3 hours.
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    Apr 22, 2011 12:20 AM GMT
    .8 not 1 gram PBW.......whey shakes until you think you going to puke......
    icon_lol.gif
  • BlackBeltGuy

    Posts: 2609

    Apr 22, 2011 12:20 AM GMT
    I did that for 3 months, got bigger but also threw a kidney stone the size of a domestic house cat.
    just sayin

  • Bigolbear

    Posts: 528

    May 08, 2011 3:51 AM GMT
    What about the 50g protein tubes that you get from places like GNC? It's not too hard to down one of those.

    Right now if I was to down my body weight in protein I would need 275g and I don't think that would be right. My doctor is telling me, for weight loss, that I should be getting between 60 and 80 a day. Currently I am at about 600 calories a day I am hitting 200 of those calories from the GNC protein tubes or 300 of those calories from the EAS shakes at 42g of protein.

    I'm going to be starting weight training in June and I am sure I am going to have to up that level and my caloric intake when I start. I'm still recovering from a recent surgery so as soon as I am able it's going to change.
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    May 08, 2011 3:55 AM GMT
    Blackbeltguy saidI did that for 3 months, got bigger but also threw a kidney stone the size of a domestic house cat.
    just sayin



    Then you weren't drinking enough water.
  • mybud

    Posts: 11819

    May 08, 2011 4:34 AM GMT
    Almost right....1 gram per pound minus your body fat...Example your 180 and 10% body fat...170 grams of protein a day...some heavy lifters intake 1.5 or more grams per pound...personally I have no problems hittin my protein # but if you do ...add protein shakes to your diet....BUD