What is your perception of Lebanon?

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    Jan 07, 2011 10:55 PM GMT
    Hey guys,

    When you think of Lebanon, what is your first perception?

    A lot of my western friends still think that beirut is a devastated war zone. What are your thoughts / experiences if you have visited Lebanon before?

    If not, do you feel you would like to visit it someday?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 07, 2011 11:10 PM GMT
    I hear it's pretty small, but really beautiful visually.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 07, 2011 11:22 PM GMT
    Beirut used to be called The Paris of the Eastern Mediterrean. Is it is as beautiful?
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    Jan 07, 2011 11:24 PM GMT
    Tintin and his adventures in Beirut is the first thing that comes to my mind!
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    Jan 07, 2011 11:28 PM GMT
    Caslon17000 saidBeirut used to be called The Paris of the Eastern Mediterrean. Is it is as beautiful?


    It is very charming. Actually Lebanon is very different from the nieghboring countries. We have beaches and we have snow and we have an amazing nature.
    Some people tell me they think we are a desert while that can't be farther from the truth icon_smile.gif

    And Lebanon is the only country in the region with cultural diversity. Christians and Muslims are 50/50 in the country.
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    Jan 07, 2011 11:37 PM GMT
    I would LOVE to visit Lebanon. I would probably weigh 700 lbs when I leave since I love lebanese food. But I'm sure it would be worth it in terms of scenery, sightseeing and meeting highly cultured and handsome people.
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    Jan 07, 2011 11:42 PM GMT
    flieslikeabeagle said I would LOVE to visit Lebanon. I would probably weigh 700 lbs when I leave since I love lebanese food. But I'm sure it would be worth it in terms of scenery, sightseeing and meeting highly cultured and handsome people.


    That's true. We are famous for our cuisine icon_smile.gif Have you tried tabbouleh?
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    Jan 07, 2011 11:50 PM GMT
    One of my favorite co-workers is "Lebanadian" (Lebanese transplant to Canada, and now lives here).
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    Jan 08, 2011 12:28 AM GMT
    first perception: war torn and devastated country, unstable, usually at war

    second perception: beautiful beaches, potential to be a world class country and tourist area..... but i doubt i would ever travel there...............and i've never met a lebanese person i haven't instantly liked...very gracious folks.....Keithicon_confused.gif
  • TrentGrad

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    Jan 08, 2011 12:33 AM GMT
    I tend to be a more politics/history oriented thinker, so Lebanon's foreign relations and civil war are the first things I think of.

    Tyre and Sidon, both of which are in Lebanon, were the former great city states of the Phoenicians, and both of which were destroyed by Alexander the Great when they tried to hold out for help from Carthage.

    But anyhow, I know this stuff isn't of much interest. I only mention these because, if I visited Lebanon, I'd be curious to see what, if anything, remains of the old Phoenician days.

    I know Rafic Hariri rebuilt much of the war destroyed infrastructure, and Beirut was once considered the financial center of the Arab world.
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    Jan 08, 2011 12:42 AM GMT
    TrentGrad saidI tend to be a more politics/history oriented thinker, so Lebanon's foreign relations and civil war are the first things I think of.

    Tyre and Sidon, both of which are in Lebanon, were the former great city states of the Phoenicians, and both of which were destroyed by Alexander the Great when they tried to hold out for help from Carthage.

    But anyhow, I know this stuff isn't of much interest. I only mention these because, if I visited Lebanon, I'd be curious to see what, if anything, remains of the old Phoenician days.

    I know Rafic Hariri rebuilt much of the war destroyed infrastructure, and Beirut was once considered the financial center of the Arab world.


    Dude, Tyre and Sidon are still standing and they are considered historical cities. Actually you would find historical ruins in all of Lebanon dating back to the Phoenician era and before, and they include Roman and Ottoman ruins also.

    And Beirut is truly the most beautiful city in the middle east nowadays.
  • Webster666

    Posts: 9217

    Jan 08, 2011 4:31 AM GMT
    A) The men are hot
    B) Their terrorist organization led government was smart enough to learn to leave Israel alone
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    Jan 08, 2011 5:18 AM GMT
    I learned about Lebanon before the Hezblahblah vs Israel events. So I always thought it was another gateway between the Middle East and Europe. It's pretty diverse religiously and it's laws against sodomy are tame compared to other Muslim dominated countries...just one year in jail.
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    Jan 08, 2011 5:32 AM GMT
    samurai111 said
    TrentGrad said
    Tyre and Sidon, both of which are in Lebanon, were the former great city states of the Phoenicians, and both of which were destroyed by Alexander the Great when they tried to hold out for help from Carthage.


    Dude, Tyre and Sidon are still standing and they are considered historical cities. Actually you would find historical ruins in all of Lebanon dating back to the Phoenician era and before, and they include Roman and Ottoman ruins also.


    I think he was referring to this:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siege_of_TyreThe Siege of Tyre was a siege of the city of Tyre, a strategic coastal base on the Mediterranean Sea, orchestrated by Alexander the Great in 332 BC during his campaigns against the Persians. The Macedonian army was unable to capture the city through conventional means because it was on an island and had walls right up to the sea. So Alexander blockaded and besieged Tyre for seven months.

    Alexander the Great ordered his engineers to use the debris of the abandoned mainland city to build a causeway and once within reach of the city walls, he used his siege engines from both the causeway and his ships to batter and finally breach the fortifications. It is said that Alexander was so enraged at the Tyrians' defense and the loss of his men that he destroyed half the city. According to Arrian, the Tyrian losses were about 8,000, while the Macedonians lost 400. Alexander granted pardon to the king and his family, whilst the 30,000 residents and foreigners taken were sold into slavery.

    http://www.middleeast.com/sidon.htmLike other Phoenician city states, Sidon suffered from a succession of conquerors.
    At the end of the Persian era in 351 B.C., unable to resist the superior forces of Artaxerxes III, the desperate Sidonians locked their gates and set fire to their city rather than to submit to the invader. More than 40,000 died in the conflagration.
    After the disaster the city was too weak to oppose the triumphal march of Alexander the Great in 333 B.C. It sued for peace and the Hellenistic age of Sidon began.
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    Jan 08, 2011 5:35 AM GMT
    This is what I think of when you mention Lebanon:
    Song of Solomon 4:11 Thy lips, O my spouse, drop as the honeycomb: honey and milk are under thy tongue; and the smell of thy garments is like the smell of Lebanon.
    Song of Solomon 5:15 His legs are as pillars of marble, set upon sockets of fine gold: his countenance is as Lebanon, excellent as the cedars.
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    Jan 08, 2011 5:41 AM GMT
    My family originates from Lebanon. I myself was born and raised here in Canada, but every year, I go Lebanon for about a month. I gotta say my favorite thing about that country is the diversity. Not only with the people but geographically. It ranges from thousand-year old temples (ruins) to high topped mountains. From scorching heat to freezing cold. I especially like the scatered villages you see randomly throughout the mountains. If your not a small-town person, there are cities such as Beirut, Tropolis and there was this place I went to...it was GORGEOUS. It was located on a cliff by the sea. It was basically a night-life city. If you ever go, you gotta try the restaurant 'Chez Pépé'.
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    Jan 08, 2011 5:43 AM GMT
    1) French and Catholic Syria

    2) Aramaic sermons in

    3) Syriac/Maronite church

    4) Now Levantine Arabic

    5) Big Arabic popstars

    6) Li Beyrouth (the song) by Fairouz

    7) CAribbean and South American emigrants

    icon_cool.gif Including Shakira

    9) the only Asian plaza in the world named after my country (plaza Curacao, in Beyrouth)

    10) DEPKE!!!!!!! icon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gif

    11) Lots of garlic!! (Kiteer toum!!)

    12) Kebbe (yummy icon_smile.gif )

    13) Derbeke

    14) Some of my closest friends from Curacao icon_smile.gif

    15) even though she is Syrian... I always sing this song... Its one of my personal favourites, and the first Arabic song I ever learned to sing, I sing it to all my Lebanese friends


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    Jan 08, 2011 5:45 AM GMT
    O and one more important thing:

    Phoenicans... and everything they gave to Europe... civilisation... alphabet... Hannibal was a phoenician icon_smile.gificon_smile.gificon_smile.gif
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    Jan 08, 2011 5:52 AM GMT
    I found some photos!

    This first picture was taking while lookingnoutnofnthe restaurant "Chez Pepe"

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/mariannaf/3166943954/in/photostream/

    This is the town of Byblos. Chez Pepe is the building by the water with leaves on the wall. Hard to see.

    http://www.emta.org.au/upload/images/Lebanon/LebanonByblos.jpg

    Honestly, my favorite city in Lebanon has to be Byblos. So much night life! Clubs, partys, Christmas-type lights stringing about the streets, people everywhere. What you see in the picture is just the ancient port. What's inside in the city is where the magic happens.
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    Jan 08, 2011 7:05 AM GMT
    I think of the dark haired, dark eyed and the light brown skined hot men walking around those beautifully cultured cities just waiting for me to see them in person. That was so shallow wasn't it. but I really do want to see Lebanon, I grew up with family friends who were from there, they were beautiful people and so friendly.
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    Jan 08, 2011 9:35 AM GMT
    q1w2e3 said
    samurai111 said
    TrentGrad said
    Tyre and Sidon, both of which are in Lebanon, were the former great city states of the Phoenicians, and both of which were destroyed by Alexander the Great when they tried to hold out for help from Carthage.


    Dude, Tyre and Sidon are still standing and they are considered historical cities. Actually you would find historical ruins in all of Lebanon dating back to the Phoenician era and before, and they include Roman and Ottoman ruins also.


    I think he was referring to this:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siege_of_TyreThe Siege of Tyre was a siege of the city of Tyre, a strategic coastal base on the Mediterranean Sea, orchestrated by Alexander the Great in 332 BC during his campaigns against the Persians. The Macedonian army was unable to capture the city through conventional means because it was on an island and had walls right up to the sea. So Alexander blockaded and besieged Tyre for seven months.

    Alexander the Great ordered his engineers to use the debris of the abandoned mainland city to build a causeway and once within reach of the city walls, he used his siege engines from both the causeway and his ships to batter and finally breach the fortifications. It is said that Alexander was so enraged at the Tyrians' defense and the loss of his men that he destroyed half the city. According to Arrian, the Tyrian losses were about 8,000, while the Macedonians lost 400. Alexander granted pardon to the king and his family, whilst the 30,000 residents and foreigners taken were sold into slavery.

    http://www.middleeast.com/sidon.htmLike other Phoenician city states, Sidon suffered from a succession of conquerors.
    At the end of the Persian era in 351 B.C., unable to resist the superior forces of Artaxerxes III, the desperate Sidonians locked their gates and set fire to their city rather than to submit to the invader. More than 40,000 died in the conflagration.
    After the disaster the city was too weak to oppose the triumphal march of Alexander the Great in 333 B.C. It sued for peace and the Hellenistic age of Sidon began.



    I know that icon_biggrin.gif
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    Jan 08, 2011 9:38 AM GMT
    amar_m said1) French and Catholic Syria

    2) Aramaic sermons in

    3) Syriac/Maronite church

    4) Now Levantine Arabic

    5) Big Arabic popstars

    6) Li Beyrouth (the song) by Fairouz

    7) CAribbean and South American emigrants

    icon_cool.gif Including Shakira

    9) the only Asian plaza in the world named after my country (plaza Curacao, in Beyrouth)

    10) DEPKE!!!!!!! icon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gif

    11) Lots of garlic!! (Kiteer toum!!)

    12) Kebbe (yummy icon_smile.gif )

    13) Derbeke

    14) Some of my closest friends from Curacao icon_smile.gif

    15) even though she is Syrian... I always sing this song... Its one of my personal favourites, and the first Arabic song I ever learned to sing, I sing it to all my Lebanese friends




    Man, wow!!! How many times have you visited Lebanon? You seem to have lived here for a while.

    P.S. Fairuz is Lebanese not Syrian ;)
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    Jan 08, 2011 9:40 AM GMT
    Kluxo saidI found some photos!

    This first picture was taking while lookingnoutnofnthe restaurant "Chez Pepe"

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/mariannaf/3166943954/in/photostream/

    This is the town of Byblos. Chez Pepe is the building by the water with leaves on the wall. Hard to see.

    http://www.emta.org.au/upload/images/Lebanon/LebanonByblos.jpg

    Honestly, my favorite city in Lebanon has to be Byblos. So much night life! Clubs, partys, Christmas-type lights stringing about the streets, people everywhere. What you see in the picture is just the ancient port. What's inside in the city is where the magic happens.


    You are right. Byblos/Jbeil is amazing. But for the real nightlife you have to go to two districts in Beirut called Gemmayzeh and Monot Street.

    The parties that happen there are why beirut is the capital city of the region ;)
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    Jan 08, 2011 10:05 AM GMT
    While I have not been to Lebanon, I have encountered a few transplants in the US during my stint there. They were all Christians that fled the country during the civil war. All extremely hospitable and inviting. The (older) women remind me of Greek mothers. Always making sure you weren't hungry. icon_smile.gif

    But what first comes to mind are the Hezbollah incursions into Israel. Then the Druze population (are they anywhere else in the wolrd in significant numbers?) And of course the "cedars of Lebanon."
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    Jan 08, 2011 11:03 AM GMT
    yourname2000 said
    samurai111 saidYou are right. Byblos/Jbeil is amazing. But for the real nightlife you have to go to two districts in Beirut called Gemmayzeh and Monot Street.

    The parties that happen there are why beirut is the capital city of the region ;)


    Wait, are you saying there are gay bars in Beirut?


    Yes sure, although you can consider them semi-oublic. Everyone knows about them but they aren't "publicly" acknowledged...