Jelly Roll

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 13, 2011 4:25 PM GMT
    If you've seen my profile, you've seen that I have lost about 50 lbs since last year. Though I am extremely happy with how I look and feel, I still have a gut and love handles, which doesn't look that great.. Someone even asked me how I got to keep the gut and love handles while losing all that weight....

    Since I workout almost everyday, I am pretty conscious of the fact that to lose the weight I have to eat right. My diet isn't horrible, but I know I can improve. My difficulty is that, as a college student who works part time and has limited time and finances, it is not always the easiest to stick to a great fat burning diet.

    What have you all done to eat right while having little time and money? I really do welcome any suggestions !
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    Jan 14, 2011 3:32 PM GMT
    I think that genetically, some of us simply aren't programmed for six-pack abs and ripped bodies. I've carried a soft padded layer of fat on my body all my life, even as a skinny kid. By my early 40s, that padding had filled out to innertube and manboob size, but even after dropping from 190 to 160 (at 6'1") back in 2004, the padded layer was still there. Since then, I ate and muscled back up to 190, dropped down to 180, and more recently calorie counted down to my current 170. I'm less paunchy at 170 than 180, but a visible layer of padding remains.
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    Jan 14, 2011 3:50 PM GMT
    Fat comes off your body in the order that it wants to, and everybody is different. I dropped 25 pounds slowly over a period of six months by doing a lot more cardio in addition to my weight training, and watching what I ate, but I still had padding over my obliques and chubby cheeks, which some people think are "cute" but I am not one of them.

    One thing I DO know is you will not be able to target the fat loss by targeting those areas for exercise. In fact, doing things like weighted side bends can have the opposite visual effect because you're developing your oblique muscle underneath the layer of fat, and -- without pinching you -- people will not know how much is muscle and how much is fat.

    Food wise I think the best thing you can do is find the level of caloric intake that enables you to continue to lose a few pounds a week and then be religiously consistent about keeping the intake steady, both day-by-day and also throughout the day. Try to eliminate as much refined sugar and white flour type items as you can (including artificial sweeteners, fruit juice, etc.). Drink a lot of water, eat things like beans, leafy greens and lean meats. A can of white tuna in water or a 1/4 pound of quality lunchmeat turkey (Boar's Head has the least crap in it of the major brands), requires no preparation, costs less than a hamburger and is miles better for you. I also eat a lot of lowfat dairy (Greek yogurt and cottage cheese) to get enough protein without too much fat or cholesterol. Greek yogurt can be pricey but it is miles better for you than the mainstream variety.

    Be patient and good to yourself... 50 lb. is a great accomplishment! As Paradox said we may not all have that lean ripped body but you can continue to make slow and steady progress if you stick with a good routine.
  • jhelling

    Posts: 168

    Jan 14, 2011 4:03 PM GMT
    Well, because you are asking for a diet that should work for a college student... It might help to know if you have access to a regular grocery store and what type of kitchen equipment you have access to. (refrigerator, freezer, stove, microwave, pots, pans, etc.) This is just so I know whether you can prepare no food or some of your food. Obviously, most college students have to eat from the dining room at times.

    As a fairly recent college graduate, I should be able to provide some help for you
  • neosyllogy

    Posts: 1714

    Jan 14, 2011 4:16 PM GMT
    I have a max $1 per 200 calorie limit when shopping to keep food costs down. (That's a max, not an average.)
    Honestly, it's really not too hard to eat well cheaply. Not ideally, but well. Part of the problem is there are all sorts of silly ideas about "healthy" foods vs. "unhealthy" foods. There are healthy diets, not healthy foods. (See: The twinkie diet for an example of a nutrition prof. losing weight on a diet of almost only hostess-like foods <--not that that's anywhere near ideal mind you icon_smile.gif.

    Honestly, I used to reject this idea, but I think the biggest thing for most people to get a healthy diet (i.e., if you don't already have one, here's how): count.
    Count calories, count g complete protien, g carbs, g fat. Make sure you're getting all your vitamins and some fiber if you can.

    If you keep track of what you're eating lots of "unhealthy" foods become cheap parts of a healthy diet.
    I eat lots of Burger King Buck Doubles for example. Just last week went to the mall, ordered 9 and kept them in my minifridge at work and ate them through the week. Will do the same the next time I have time.
    $1 for 410 calories, ~24g of protein (for get exact amount) and 1:1:2 protein:carbs:fat ratios.

    As long as I'm getting enough protein and other essentials, I'm not really very concerend where the rest of my calories come from. Lean pockets are also a good deal for easy to make food.
    Other cheap and easy foods: potatoes, sweet potatoes (you can microwave both and eat 'em), eggs, oatmeal, bulk protein powder (this can actually be an excellent financial choice, as protein is usually the most expensive thing to get; I like shopping at dpsnutrition.net, prefer Optimum Nutrition brand).

    Also just buy things that are on sale.
    As long as you're counting (which is cumbersome at first, but you get used to it) you can keep your diet healthy.


    [Note: if you're on a school meal plan the same basic idea applies. You just have to do some research and guesstimation to figure out the calorie content of foods (and maybe bring a measuring cup with you - fuck it if it looks wierd, let the mf'ers laugh while you're getting healthy : ) . Diets are like money, people get into debt usually because they're not paying attention.]
  • neosyllogy

    Posts: 1714

    Jan 14, 2011 4:19 PM GMT
    paradox saidI think that genetically, some of us simply aren't programmed for six-pack abs and ripped bodies. I've carried a soft padded layer of fat on my body all my life, even as a skinny kid. By my early 40s, that padding had filled out to innertube and manboob size, but even after dropping from 190 to 160 (at 6'1") back in 2004, the padded layer was still there. Since then, I ate and muscled back up to 190, dropped down to 180, and more recently calorie counted down to my current 170. I'm less paunchy at 170 than 180, but a visible layer of padding remains.


    Any invocation of genetics in relation to fitness is at least 90% BS.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 14, 2011 4:23 PM GMT
    Check out the 17 Day Diet which has been on a number of programs such as The Doctors and Dr. Phil. I ordered the book and have found the four cycle program to be one of the best. The receipes are great and very easy to prepare as well as easy on your wallet. I really love the chicken soup which I prepare every week. You will find that you do not feel like you are on a diet and all of the food is healthy. It is mainly changing your mindset and working out as needed. i lost 15 pounds in the first two weeks and never felt hungry. You have to go to www.17DayDiet.com to order the book. I check out the food delivery program but decied that that was too costly a route to take when I can purchase eggs, etc. for the breakfast, lunch, and dinner meals. I am spending less on groceries than I use to. I also cut out all soft drinks and now drink only water. Once you get used to it is is not difficult to follow. You can allow yourself onen cheat day a week if you like.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 19, 2011 5:05 AM GMT
    jhelling saidWell, because you are asking for a diet that should work for a college student... It might help to know if you have access to a regular grocery store and what type of kitchen equipment you have access to. (refrigerator, freezer, stove, microwave, pots, pans, etc.) This is just so I know whether you can prepare no food or some of your food. Obviously, most college students have to eat from the dining room at times.

    As a fairly recent college graduate, I should be able to provide some help for you


    A context is important I suppose. I live off campus and do have access to stove, oven, fridge, etc. The main constraints are money and time. I don't mind preparing food at all, I just often need it to be quick (ex: scrambled eggs). Hope this helps.

    Thanks for all the suggestions!
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    Jan 19, 2011 5:21 AM GMT
    I'm not one to encourage "fad diets," but my bf lost about 80 pounds on Atkins- doing it the real Atkins way, following the books- and has kept it off for quite a while now. He went from 220 to 140, and is the process of increasing his carb count for maintenance and exercising to build lean muscle.