Martin Luther King, Jr. Day 2011 (Monday 1/17)

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    Jan 16, 2011 3:24 AM GMT
    How will you be spending Martin Luther King, Jr. Day 2011... at work, day off, volunteering, etc? What does the day (or the man himself) mean to you?

    Here are forums from years past:
    2008: http://www.realjock.com/gayforums/87620
    2010: http://www.realjock.com/gayforums/794004
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    Jan 16, 2011 3:28 AM GMT
    Yes, I volunteer (tutoring kids) 3x a week at an inner city high school which is almost 100% African American. It's really been a great experience.
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    Jan 16, 2011 6:41 AM GMT
    I'm on vaca but will return to wrk for the day, I get time and a half pay and another day off. After that... I go back on vaca.
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    Jan 16, 2011 6:43 AM GMT
    I'll be spending all day Monday thinking about Black rappers with a smile and then possibly downloading some porn with some Black Brazilians to fap to later on.

    And KUDDOS to the OP for researching past threads.
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    Jan 16, 2011 6:55 AM GMT
    JB82 saidI'll be spending all day Monday thinking about Black rappers with a smile and then possibly downloading some porn with some Black Brazilians to fap to later on.

    And KUDDOS to the OP for researching past threads.



    SICK F**Kicon_eek.gificon_lol.gif
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    Jan 16, 2011 2:23 PM GMT
    Working - this new company doesn't give MLK and i'm not using one of my PTOs
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    Jan 16, 2011 2:26 PM GMT
    I'm in college so i will have that day off icon_smile.gif
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    Jan 17, 2011 1:24 AM GMT
    I'll be at work.

    Here is a compilation of clips of Dr. King on Meet the Press in 1967:

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    Jan 17, 2011 1:25 AM GMT


    DAY OFF BABY!
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    Jan 17, 2011 1:38 AM GMT
    I highly recommend people to attend the "Kingdom Day Parade". It begins at 11am at Martin Luther King Blvd and Western Ave in the City of Crenshaw.

    If you go tell me how you fared.

    Good luck, because you'll need it! ;-)


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    Jan 17, 2011 2:26 AM GMT
    rockinb saidI highly recommend people to attend the "Kingdom Day Parade". It begins at 11am at Martin Luther King Blvd and Western Ave in the City of Crenshaw.

    If you go tell me how you fared.

    Good luck, because you'll need it! ;-)


    Sounds interesting. Here's an article about tomorrow's parade: http://www.lasentinel.net/26th-Annual-Kingdom-Day-Parade.html

    Here's the parade route: http://trafficinfo.lacity.org/images/kingtmp2011.pdf

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    Jan 17, 2011 2:43 AM GMT
    I am workingicon_confused.gif
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    Jan 17, 2011 2:48 AM GMT
    Working here, but its a paid holiday (which is a plus). But MLK to me means triumph, courage, honor, dedication, and humility. Because of his fight and struggles, I live in the world that I live in today. Yes racism is still in effect, but it is much better than what it used to be. Its still a work in progress and it takes effort on everybody's part.
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    Jan 17, 2011 3:07 AM GMT
    http://www.realjock.com/gayforums/933474

    I am not American, and so this is not a holiday up North. However, Dr. King had more than an American message, more than an African American message, he had truly global messages, and so his words, actions and ideas are relevant not to any one group, 'race', nation or people, but all people everywhere.

    What I find most interesting about Martin Luther King day in particular, is that when ever government bodies or the media reflect on King in their portrayal of a 'great man', they never fail to forget to portray him as he was in the last years of his life. What I mean, is that when people talk about all the things King did, or tried to do, they think of Civil Rights alone (which is, in itself a monumental movement and feat), yet, King began campaigns against war, the American Empire and poverty in the last years of his life.

    The media will reflect upon his "I had a Dream" speech, and forget the campaigns and ideas of his later years, when the media, during that time, demonized and attacked King, and now they simply ignore him.

    In 1967, King delivered what I consider his greatest speech, "Beyond Vietnam," in which he explained his outrage and opposition to not simply the Vietnam War, but the American empire, economic exploitation and poverty of all people everywhere. In the speech, he called America "the greatest purveyor of violence in the world."

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b80Bsw0UG-U&feature=related

    After delivering such a monumental speech against war and empire, King was attacked by the national media; with Life Magazine calling the speech, “demagogic slander that sounded like a script for Radio Hanoi,” and the Washington Post saying that, “King has diminished his usefulness to his cause, his country, his people.”
    http://www.fair.org/index.php?page=2269

    Another FORGOTTEN and IGNORED fact of recent history. In 1999, the King family took the case to court, in which they proved the innocence of James Earl Ray, and in which the jury concluded that King was in fact killed in a conspiracy by the U.S. government (specifically, elements of military intelligence, CIA, FBI, and Memphis Police), and that the government did this precisely because King became too much of a threat to the establishment, by challenging the fundamental nature of poverty, exploitation, war and empire.
    https://www.thekingcenter.org/KingCenter/Transcript_press_conference.aspx
    http://dissidentvoice.org/2008/04/who-killed-martin-luther-king/
    http://www.counterpunch.org/valentine02112003.html

    At the press conference following the verdict, it was explained that the reason for the assassination was that Martin Luther King, "took on those forces, powerful economic forces that dominated politics in this land, they killed him. He was killed because he could not be stopped. He was killed because they feared that half a million people would rise in revolution in the capitol of this country, and do what Mr. Jefferson said needed to be done every 20 years, to cleanse this land. This land has not been cleansed. This nation has not faced the problems that Martin Luther King, Jr. died trying to face and confront. They still exist today, the forces of evil, the powerful economic forces that dominate the government of this land and make money on war and deprive the poor of what is their right, their birthright. They still abound and they rule."
    https://www.thekingcenter.org/KingCenter/Transcript_press_conference.aspx

    Next to no mainstream media covered this groundbreaking court case. However, Judge Joe Brown (now famous for his own show) has spoken out quite consistently on this issue and verdict.

    This should have been the trial of the century, but the major trial of the 1990s was O.J. Simpson. Both were involving black men; yet one was regarding a black celebrity accused of and widely assumed to be guilty of committing murder, while the other was about a true hero who was killed by the government for seeking to help the people. Everyone exposed to the American media during the 1990s and on has a strong cultural memory of O.J. Simpson, yet most people have absolutely no awareness of this court case.

    So, I think that on Martin Luther King day, instead of simply saying how great he was, and looking back as if the 'goal' was 'accomplished', perhaps it could be beneficial to actually listen to and read what King said and wrote, and see how the project he started was forgotten, and needs to be restarted. It seems like a good day to educate oneself on King and his ideas, so I think I might do a bit of that.
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    Jan 17, 2011 3:16 AM GMT
    We have the day off at my company.
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    Jan 17, 2011 3:16 AM GMT
    my store doesn't pay MKL holiday.lol
  • boilerup_82

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    Jan 17, 2011 3:21 AM GMT
    unfortunately, MLK day reminds me LA's last major earthquake...it happened on MLK day in 1994, 17 years ago...it was one of the worst experiences I've been through...our home was severely damaged, we had to move in with the neighbors for a few monts...just a bad experience overall icon_sad.gif
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    Jan 17, 2011 3:22 AM GMT
    No school/ no work= Probably drinking
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    Jan 17, 2011 3:35 AM GMT
    I have two black brother in laws and they both work in corporate places and earn a living supporting their families and if it wasn't for MLK none of their goals would come true. That being said if it wasn't for MLK having a vision to better America and the people in our country then my sisters wouldn't have the happiness they share and have shared. Thanks to MLK we have a president of color and thanks to him we a chance to be bold because he fought for equality for all, not just the African American community.

    I'll spend my day watching basketball which starts 1pm est lol

    happy MLK day
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    Jan 17, 2011 3:46 AM GMT
    MeOhMy saidhttp://www.realjock.com/gayforums/933474

    I am not American, and so this is not a holiday up North. However, Dr. King had more than an American message, more than an African American message, he had truly global messages, and so his words, actions and ideas are relevant not to any one group, 'race', nation or people, but all people everywhere.

    What I find most interesting about Martin Luther King day in particular, is that when ever government bodies or the media reflect on King in their portrayal of a 'great man', they never fail to forget to portray him as he was in the last years of his life. What I mean, is that when people talk about all the things King did, or tried to do, they think of Civil Rights alone (which is, in itself a monumental movement and feat), yet, King began campaigns against war, the American Empire and poverty in the last years of his life.

    The media will reflect upon his "I had a Dream" speech, and forget the campaigns and ideas of his later years, when the media, during that time, demonized and attacked King, and now they simply ignore him.

    In 1967, King delivered what I consider his greatest speech, "Beyond Vietnam," in which he explained his outrage and opposition to not simply the Vietnam War, but the American empire, economic exploitation and poverty of all people everywhere. In the speech, he called America "the greatest purveyor of violence in the world."

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b80Bsw0UG-U&feature=related

    After delivering such a monumental speech against war and empire, King was attacked by the national media; with Life Magazine calling the speech, “demagogic slander that sounded like a script for Radio Hanoi,” and the Washington Post saying that, “King has diminished his usefulness to his cause, his country, his people.”
    http://www.fair.org/index.php?page=2269

    Another FORGOTTEN and IGNORED fact of recent history. In 1999, the King family took the case to court, in which they proved the innocence of James Earl Ray, and in which the jury concluded that King was in fact killed in a conspiracy by the U.S. government (specifically, elements of military intelligence, CIA, FBI, and Memphis Police), and that the government did this precisely because King became too much of a threat to the establishment, by challenging the fundamental nature of poverty, exploitation, war and empire.
    https://www.thekingcenter.org/KingCenter/Transcript_press_conference.aspx
    http://dissidentvoice.org/2008/04/who-killed-martin-luther-king/
    http://www.counterpunch.org/valentine02112003.html

    At the press conference following the verdict, it was explained that the reason for the assassination was that Martin Luther King, "took on those forces, powerful economic forces that dominated politics in this land, they killed him. He was killed because he could not be stopped. He was killed because they feared that half a million people would rise in revolution in the capitol of this country, and do what Mr. Jefferson said needed to be done every 20 years, to cleanse this land. This land has not been cleansed. This nation has not faced the problems that Martin Luther King, Jr. died trying to face and confront. They still exist today, the forces of evil, the powerful economic forces that dominate the government of this land and make money on war and deprive the poor of what is their right, their birthright. They still abound and they rule."
    https://www.thekingcenter.org/KingCenter/Transcript_press_conference.aspx

    Next to no mainstream media covered this groundbreaking court case. However, Judge Joe Brown (now famous for his own show) has spoken out quite consistently on this issue and verdict.

    This should have been the trial of the century, but the major trial of the 1990s was O.J. Simpson. Both were involving black men; yet one was regarding a black celebrity accused of and widely assumed to be guilty of committing murder, while the other was about a true hero who was killed by the government for seeking to help the people. Everyone exposed to the American media during the 1990s and on has a strong cultural memory of O.J. Simpson, yet most people have absolutely no awareness of this court case.

    So, I think that on Martin Luther King day, instead of simply saying how great he was, and looking back as if the 'goal' was 'accomplished', perhaps it could be beneficial to actually listen to and read what King said and wrote, and see how the project he started was forgotten, and needs to be restarted. It seems like a good day to educate oneself on King and his ideas, so I think I might do a bit of that.


    I agree. Dr. King was a GREAT Sociologist.
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    Jan 17, 2011 6:08 AM GMT
    Here is Google's logo commemorating Martin Luther King, Jr. Day 2011:

    mlk11-hp.jpg
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    Jan 17, 2011 6:11 AM GMT
    Working unfortunately...
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    Jan 17, 2011 6:24 AM GMT
    thankful.
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    Jan 17, 2011 6:26 AM GMT
    I will be at work all day, but what he embodied definitely is something that was monumental...
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    Jan 17, 2011 6:32 AM GMT
    Playing

    Fallout-New-Vegas.png

    Protecting the post apocalyptic world from tyranny and slavery, just like King Jr.....errrr Malcolm X... no, THE TERMINATOR!