Where are all the SCIENTISTS in America?? How could we let them DO this??!

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    Jan 18, 2011 1:59 AM GMT
    Japanese Researchers to Clone Wooly Mammoth within Five Years!

    TOKYO (AFP) – Japanese researchers will launch a project this year to resurrect the long-extinct mammoth by using cloning technology to bring the ancient pachyderm back to life in around five years time.

    The researchers will try to revive the species by obtaining tissue this summer from the carcass of a mammoth preserved in a Russian research laboratory, the Yomiuri Shimbun reported.

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    "Preparations to realise this goal have been made," Akira Iritani, leader of the team and a professor emeritus of Kyoto University, told the mass-circulation daily.

    Under the plan, the nuclei of mammoth cells will be inserted into an elephant's egg cell from which the nuclei have been removed, to create an embryo containing mammoth genes, the report said.

    The embryo will then be inserted into an elephant's uterus in the hope that the animal will eventually give birth to a baby mammoth.

    The elephant is the closest modern relative of the mammoth, a huge woolly mammal believed to have died out with the last Ice Age.


    http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20110117/wl_asia_afp/japansciencemammoth_20110117104445
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    Jan 18, 2011 2:03 AM GMT
    Majority of these experiments fail when it comes to humans. I doubt they will be successful. The present day elephant is too genetically diverse from a woolly mammoth. Even if the engineered mammoth survives, it will not be able to procreate. Will the elephant, which has a lot smaller body than an adult mammoth, be able to carry the foetus to term? Thus, the experiment is useless. It may give scientists more insight about techniques of genetically-modifying/selecting offsprings.
    Religious organizations will also be reluctant about this procedure.
    Funding would be needed. Why waste it on a long dead animal when you can use it for something else?
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    Jan 18, 2011 2:30 AM GMT
    carminea said Even if the engineered mammoth survives, it will not be able to procreate. Will the elephant, which has a lot smaller body than an adult mammoth, be able to carry the foetus to term? Thus, the experiment is useless. It may give scientists more insight about techniques of genetically-modifying/selecting offsprings.


    I think that if they are successful, they would create more(mammoths) as there were/are different corpses that were found to get DNA samples from. Plus, I believe that we (humans) were the cause of their extinction, so if we could bring them back, why not?
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    Jan 18, 2011 2:38 AM GMT
    Oh they're gonna do it. Even if they fail after five years, they will eventually get it right. Meanwhile we just sit on our asses and do NOTHING! We've got to BEAT them to it!!
    icon_evil.gif
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    Jan 18, 2011 2:40 AM GMT
    Interesting thought...a T-rex to be born to a crocodile. Or a Neanderthal born to a...gasp...human! What about Homo habilis? icon_eek.gif
  • musclmed

    Posts: 3279

    Jan 18, 2011 3:11 AM GMT
    ewe_nik saidOh they're gonna do it. Even if they fail after five years, they will eventually get it right. Meanwhile we just sit on our asses and do NOTHING! We've got to BEAT them to it!!
    icon_evil.gif


    Just because you can, doesnt mean you should.

    For what reason do we clone the mammoth back into existence. Maybe there was a reason it went extinct?

    Alot of ethical questions involved.
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    Jan 18, 2011 3:16 AM GMT
    ewe_nik saidOh they're gonna do it. Even if they fail after five years, they will eventually get it right. Meanwhile we just sit on our asses and do NOTHING! We've got to BEAT them to it!!
    icon_evil.gif

    It is highly unlikely that the necessary useful DNA is present. The mammoth will be sick as the environment may not sustain it. Who will it procreate with? I am not a geneticist. However, they do these experiments with humans when they are infertile. It takes many, many samples from an abundant source to have a viable foetus. Also, the female elephant probably will not be able to sustain a foetus bigger than what they are designed to carry.

    Again, why would you do this?
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    Jan 18, 2011 3:23 AM GMT
    Why do we *have* to beat them to it? Does it really matter? It's not like a slap in the face to America or anything if Japan is the first (or only) country to clone a mammoth.
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    Jan 18, 2011 3:26 AM GMT
    q1w2e3 saidInteresting thought...a T-rex to be born to a crocodile. Or a Neanderthal born to a...gasp...human! What about Homo habilis? icon_eek.gif
    Just great. All we need is more Homo's. icon_razz.gif
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    Jan 18, 2011 3:31 AM GMT
    musclmed said
    ewe_nik saidOh they're gonna do it. Even if they fail after five years, they will eventually get it right. Meanwhile we just sit on our asses and do NOTHING! We've got to BEAT them to it!!
    icon_evil.gif


    Just because you can, doesnt mean you should.

    For what reason do we clone the mammoth back into existence. Maybe there was a reason it went extinct?

    Alot of ethical questions involved.


    Just because you can't imagine a good reason to do it doesn't mean good reasons don't exist. And of course they went extinct for a reason, it doesn't just happen at random. And are you really pulling the PETA card and complaining about animal rights? They don't even have to kill any animals to do it...
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    Jan 18, 2011 3:38 AM GMT
    carmineaIt is highly unlikely that the necessary useful DNA is present. The mammoth will be sick as the environment may not sustain it. Who will it procreate with? I am not a geneticist. However, they do these experiments with humans when they are infertile. It takes many, many samples from an abundant source to have a viable foetus. Also, the female elephant probably will not be able to sustain a foetus bigger than what they are designed to carry.

    Again, why would you do this?


    From a science blog:

    So how could the technique be used? Some of the more fanciful media reports suggest it will usher in an age when it is commonplace for people to have their brains plunged into a deep freeze upon death in the hope that someone might want to clone them later on. That would be a very odd thing. The clone would of course look very similar, and might even have some familiar behavioural traits, but in every other sense it would be just another human being, shaped by a different environment and experiences. We will probably have enough people in the future to rule out any deep desire to bring back anyone who hoped to live on in the deep freeze.

    But this research might be relevant to humans in other ways. Perhaps cells from major organs could be frozen while we're still young and cloned in old age to make healthy tissues to replace damaged or diseased parts.


    http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/blog/2008/nov/04/cloning-frozen-mice
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    Jan 18, 2011 3:44 AM GMT
    ewe_nik said
    From a science blog:

    So how could the technique be used? Some of the more fanciful media reports suggest it will usher in an age when it is commonplace for people to have their brains plunged into a deep freeze upon death in the hope that someone might want to clone them later on. That would be a very odd thing. The clone would of course look very similar, and might even have some familiar behavioural traits, but in every other sense it would be just another human being, shaped by a different environment and experiences. We will probably have enough people in the future to rule out any deep desire to bring back anyone who hoped to live on in the deep freeze.

    But this research might be relevant to humans in other ways. Perhaps cells from major organs could be frozen while we're still young and cloned in old age to make healthy tissues to replace damaged or diseased parts.


    http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/blog/2008/nov/04/cloning-frozen-mice

    So I can understand that. But this is in a case when you are producing a species in another species. Why not practice with something that has a higher chance of being carried to term like mice that were frozen some years ago or something? Like I said before, the necessary DNA may not even be present for the woolly mammoth like it would be for a human brain.
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    Jan 18, 2011 3:51 AM GMT
    carmineaSo I can understand that. But this is in a case when you are producing a species in another species. Why not practice with something that has a higher chance of being carried to term like mice that were frozen some years ago or something? Like I said before, the necessary DNA may not even be present for the woolly mammoth like it would be for a human brain.


    From the article, it seems there is plenty of preserved mammoth DNA. The cells may not be completely intact because of the freezing, but the DNA seems fine. I imagine this technique is to test the ability of scientists to recreate cells from DNA as much as it is to test the ability to clone frozen cells.
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    Jan 18, 2011 3:57 AM GMT
    So Craig Venter copied the DNA of one bacteria and replaced another's with it:
    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/05/21/science/21cell.html

    Eukaryote genomes are much larger, but it's probably doable (histones are well conserved). So the challenge would be to see if the mitochondria and other cellular components of the host species are compatible with the donor DNA.


  • rioriz

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    Jan 18, 2011 4:04 AM GMT
    I think this is very exciting news! I would love it if they did it and don't mind that it is not US scientists. I mean hell our budget to explore space was significantly cut so where would the money come from for scientific studies like this
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    Jan 18, 2011 4:57 AM GMT
    I hope mammoth is tasty!
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    Jan 18, 2011 5:12 AM GMT
    rioriz saidI think this is very exciting news! I would love it if they did it and don't mind that it is not US scientists. I mean hell our budget to explore space was significantly cut so where would the money come from for scientific studies like this


    Wake up! The future is TODAY. One of these days we'll no longer be in an economic rut, but we'll be dreadfully behind the world in science, clawing to restore our grace. Is that what we want??