New to working out. Frustrated & unsure.

  • KRM13

    Posts: 9

    Jan 18, 2011 10:32 PM GMT
    Hi,

    I've recently joined a gym in hopes of going 3-4 times a week (to start). My concern is that I have no idea what I'm doing, that I'll look stupid doing the exercises, what I'm supposed to eat, etc etc etc. I can't afford a personal trainer and I have nobody to go with me. I'm so frustrated because of this. And it doesn't help that I'm shy too.

    Any advice?

    Thanks.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 19, 2011 12:08 AM GMT
    Hey bud,
    First of all, if you've joined a reputable gym, they will have included a free fitness assessment in your membership, which means a session with a trainer to figure out your starting point and to hear what you want to accomplish, with some advice on how to go about it.
    If this has not been offered, and you still can, you might want to rescind your membership and find someplace that does offer this.
    Granted, they'll also try to sell you trainer sessions, but you just politely decline.
    There are some good workout routines on the site. You can also google around for "workouts for beginners".
    YouTubing something similar will give you videos demonstrating basic workouts.
    Cheers.
  • KRM13

    Posts: 9

    Jan 19, 2011 12:53 AM GMT
    Hi DelisleGuy

    You're absolutely right. I did do an assessment with a trainer and yes they did try to sell me sessions. But I politely declined. Am I allowed to get a copy of their assessment or is that something for their eyes only? If I could get a copy of that it'll at least point me in some direction.

    And you're right. There's great stuff on RJ and I'm sure I can google and youtube things as well.

    All good info.

    Thanks.
  • Springer70

    Posts: 65

    Jan 19, 2011 2:41 AM GMT
    OK... it's easier than you think.

    Firstly, we've all been there. We all started out from nothing and needed to learn, well, pretty much everything. I started for the first time when I was 35, and was just like you; stupid (sorry). Personally, I had a trainer for my first 5 or 6 weeks, and I found it to be very helpful, but if you'd rather not, there are resources out there for you. Here's my best pitch at what you could do:

    - start slowly. If you've never been to a gym on a regular basis before, start by picking a cardio machine, and just do that for 15 or 20 minutes (or whatever you can without dying). A simple treadmill or non-intimidating-looking machine will do you wonders. Use this time to look around at the other machines that are there, and watch others using them. Please, however, don't copy other people in the gym too much, as I'm always amazed at how much poor form is out there.

    - read this site: http://www.exrx.net, and especially http://www.exrx.net/Beginning.html, it's a very helpful and reputable resource, with videos to guide you into good form.

    - for a very basic and really good intro workout, try to master 4 basic lifts (at first, using machines, if you're more comfortable there, and then moving to free-weights; which offer a better workout)
    -- squats
    -- deadlifts
    -- bench press
    -- shoulder press
    (and don't forget to stretch)

    If you're able 3 times a week, for about 1/2 an hour is enough to start. There's really no need to swish around the gym for 3 hours lifting and pulling things. Stay focused and track your results. You'll notice that each week, you should be able to add weight to what you're able to lift.

    of course there are others, and they all offer benefits, but this should get you going, and give you a chance to see some changes in your body to motivate you further.

    Happy gym-ing. And, don't give up. I've found that the on the days I most DON'T want to go, and I manage to drag my ass there, are the most rewarding.

    (I still think a good trainer is worth the money, if you can)

  • KRM13

    Posts: 9

    Jan 19, 2011 2:47 AM GMT
    Thanks Springer70,

    Great source of information. I'll be sure to check out that site.

  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16311

    Jan 19, 2011 2:49 AM GMT
    Good advice so far.. I'll add a couple of things.


    You need to be specific about what you want to achieve.
    Vague, "I want to look better" doesn't get you very far. I think you need
    to get some goals you can share and develop some means to get there.
    Make the goals reasonable. It really would help if you could get some input from a trainer or someone that can help you with an assessment.
    I'd know things like your blood pressure, certainly your weight and general
    health stats... do you need to improve something there that might add
    to your overall health? In other words, is that about "looking better" or
    improving health & wellness? Once you develop goals, how to get there,
    you need to start in..... and input during the "trip" is always helpful

    RJ can be a part of that. I hope it all goes well.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 19, 2011 2:49 AM GMT
    Well...i am going to go to the College GYM...and i dunno what to do there O_O, i know i will use the running machine...but, in the weight thingd, i have no idea....i dont wana break my back icon_sad.gif
  • MuscleComeBac...

    Posts: 2376

    Jan 19, 2011 2:50 AM GMT
    Post here, and post frequently.
    Make a commitment to keep others informed of how it's going. Set expectations for yourself that are reasonable and that include accountability.
    So, if we don't hear from you - then we'll knock politely and say "So, how's it going?" And allow others to encourage, inspire and coach you forward.
    You've already done the two best things you can-
    1. Got started
    2. Made a public declaration of your commitment

    Keep it up, and let us know how it's going.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 19, 2011 2:51 AM GMT
    Springer, that's exactly what I've done. icon_eek.gif (except the part about being in the gym 1/2 a day...I think you meant 1/2 hour a day)icon_razz.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 19, 2011 2:51 AM GMT
    Springer70 saidOK... it's easier than you think.

    Firstly, we've all been there. We all started out from nothing and needed to learn, well, pretty much everything. I started for the first time when I was 35, and was just like you; stupid (sorry). Personally, I had a trainer for my first 5 or 6 weeks, and I found it to be very helpful, but if you'd rather not, there are resources out there for you. Here's my best pitch at what you could do:

    - start slowly. If you've never been to a gym on a regular basis before, start by picking a cardio machine, and just do that for 15 or 20 minutes (or whatever you can without dying). A simple treadmill or non-intimidating-looking machine will do you wonders. Use this time to look around at the other machines that are there, and watch others using them. Please, however, don't copy other people in the gym too much, as I'm always amazed at how much poor form is out there.

    - read this site: http://www.exrx.net, and especially http://www.exrx.net/Beginning.html, it's a very helpful and reputable resource, with videos to guide you into good form.

    - for a very basic and really good intro workout, try to master 4 basic lifts (at first, using machines, if you're more comfortable there, and then moving to free-weights; which offer a better workout)
    -- squats
    -- deadlifts
    -- bench press
    -- shoulder press
    (and don't forget to stretch)

    If you're able 3 times a week, for about 1/2 a day is enough to start. There's really no need to swish around the gym for 3 hours lifting and pulling things. Stay focused and track your results. You'll notice that each week, you should be able to add weight to what you're able to lift.

    of course there are others, and they all offer benefits, but this should get you going, and give you a chance to see some changes in your body to motivate you further.

    Happy gym-ing. And, don't give up. I've found that the on the days I most DON'T want to go, and I manage to drag my ass there, are the most rewarding.

    (I still think a good trainer is worth the money, if you can)



    agree .. I started by selectively reading Arnold's encyclopedia .. good resource .
  • Springer70

    Posts: 65

    Jan 19, 2011 2:55 AM GMT
    q1w2e3 saidSpringer, that's exactly what I've done. icon_eek.gif (except the part about being in the gym 1/2 a day...I think you meant 1/2 hour a day)icon_razz.gif


    whoops... yes, I mean 1/2 hour not 1/2 day ... (facepalm) & (headdesk)... thanks for catching that, I corrected my original post.
  • KRM13

    Posts: 9

    Jan 19, 2011 3:40 AM GMT
    Thanks everyone. You've all provided me with great ideas. I think RJ is a great site with great people. Stay tuned to hear about my progress and my goals. I have a strong feeling that 2011 is going to be my year and that things are going to happen. I'm committed to change in my life, both personal and work life. I know I can do better and plan on doing everything I can to get to where I want to be.

    Exciting times!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 19, 2011 4:07 AM GMT
    KRM13 saidHi DelisleGuy

    You're absolutely right. I did do an assessment with a trainer and yes they did try to sell me sessions. But I politely declined. Am I allowed to get a copy of their assessment or is that something for their eyes only? If I could get a copy of that it'll at least point me in some direction.

    And you're right. There's great stuff on RJ and I'm sure I can google and youtube things as well.

    All good info.

    Thanks.


    You paid for the assessment. You are entitled to a copy.