Dogging on my Degree

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 20, 2011 4:42 PM GMT
    Is anyone else a Kinesiology major ?? Like my friends kid around alot about how my degree is pointless since they are like pre-pharm and engineering majors. I won't lie its not the hardest classes but hey I enjoy it. In my mind a college degree is a college degree and helps out regardless.. What is everyone elses opinion on it ??
  • disasterpiece

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    Jan 20, 2011 4:49 PM GMT
    When you'll be 45 and still love what you do as a job, you'll be the one laughing at those poor jaded people that chose a job that payed.
  • shoelessj

    Posts: 511

    Jan 20, 2011 5:56 PM GMT
    Disasterpiece saidWhen you'll be 45 and still love what you do as a job, you'll be the one laughing at those poor jaded people that chose a job that payed.


    great comment. thumbs up.
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    Jan 21, 2011 10:41 AM GMT
    The most important thing is that you enjoy your course of study. If you can use it later on in life to build a career (e.g., physical therapist, occupational therapist, personal trainer, chiropractor), even better. In addition to kinesiology, psychology is another degree that often gets dumped on as an easy or blow-off major.
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    Jan 21, 2011 10:59 AM GMT
    I'm a KIN major, most people have the conception that it means I want to be a P.E. teacher but it's actually a bad ass degree. I also like it cuz alot of the job options require a lot of movement and interactions with people (i.e. director for a fitness center at any place) instead of just being stuck sitting somewhere for 8 hours.
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    Jan 22, 2011 2:24 AM GMT
    My degree is Athletic Training (not far off from Kinese) and it is consistently rated as one of the worst paying degrees out there. Though I used it to go into personal training and not taping ankles, I am very happy in my career and this is speaking as a 40 something.
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    Jan 22, 2011 2:26 AM GMT
    Stick with it....you'll be glad you did.
  • mizu5

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    Jan 22, 2011 2:27 AM GMT
    IN Canada Hkin is ...very intense progrma with many difficult science courses to take. Or so I've learned from my friends in it.

    I'm and east asian studies and English lit double major.
    Useless, and it won't lead to a career, but at least IM having fun.
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    Jan 22, 2011 2:30 AM GMT
    Dude,

    do what you love, because if you don't love what you do, it'll lack passion, and you will never be as good at something that you lack a true passion for.


    .
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    Jan 22, 2011 2:34 AM GMT
    Kinesiology student right here!

    With a degree in that field, there are a lot of fields towards which you can head. Sports marketing, community health, health promotion, a step towards rehabilitative sciences, education, trainer...just expand your mindset. We're not all trainers and P.E. teachers. Try and see if there's some sort of internship/cooperative education program available at your school.
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    Jan 22, 2011 2:35 AM GMT
    It's true that some degrees are more easily marketed than others. So, just be prepared to do the leg work and networking to make that career happen. Some also questioned my degree (PhD in Educational Studies). There was about a year and a half after I graduated that I had somewhat of a hard time finding a job. But I just kept networking, networking, networking. And asking questions, questions, questions, to learn all that I could to get a job. It came. I'm a professor now (my dream job). I'm not rich (I make about $55,000) but I have the summer's off (from mid july to late September), a long Winter Break (almost all of December), and a Spring Break. Everyday I get to do creative things, and help people see how fascinating Education is. No day is ever the same and I have full creative control in my classroom. I love my job.

    As I'm typing this, I'm on my way to San Francisco on a plane to go to a teaching/learning conference (I also have a travel budget to present research).

    I worked REAL hard to get here, but I can't imagine doing anything else. Do what you love, and be smart about the financial end of it. Some of my friends hate their jobs. I love mine.
  • calibro

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    Jan 22, 2011 2:48 AM GMT
    A degree is honestly what you make of it. People might look at my degrees and wonder about their worth, but they're entirely appropriate for what I want to do. I feel successful both financially and personally.

    I know a lot of people make fun of a degree like English, assuming you have to be an English teacher, but those people neglect that being able to read well and write well are some of the most important aspects to being successful-- aside from the degree being a social degree, in which students learn to interact and work with their peers, which is another important skill to have. I can't tell you how many jobs I've landed in fields where I felt I was not qualified for simply because I was able to write my application well. And no, I wasn't an English major.
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    Jan 22, 2011 5:44 AM GMT
    I think they may have a different perspective when your wrapping up the knee of the quarter back before he he goes out to get his Super Bowl ring and they're setting at home doing their taxes wonder what happened to their lives.
    Follow your Bliss.
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    Jan 22, 2011 5:55 AM GMT
    I think do "what you love" and "follow your passion", are ok to have as part of your criteria, however, they should not be the entire basis for a career choice, money makes the world go round afterall.
  • delthespaz

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    Jan 22, 2011 5:59 AM GMT
    i work in a field i didn't graduate in. enjoy it. that's my only advice.
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    Jan 22, 2011 6:19 AM GMT
    College is about learning, not choosing a career. Follow your bliss, as Joseph Campbell used to say. Everything else sorts itself out when you remain true to your self.
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    Jan 22, 2011 6:20 AM GMT
    canuckguy19 saidI think do "what you love" and "follow your passion", are ok to have as part of your criteria, however, they should not be the entire basis for a career choice, money makes the world go round afterall.


    yes,it does.

    All the people I do hospice care for talk about how they wished they had made more money.
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    Jan 22, 2011 6:41 AM GMT
    I'm an Academic Advisor for the University of California and I always tell my students when you pick a major it needs to be based on *interest* and *ability*. Those are the only two things to worry about, not what kind of job you're going to get with it. Employers in most general business settings don't particularly care what your major is. They're looking at your GPA and what related internships/part-time work experiences you have. Your GPA is important because it's an indicator of how well you learn and follow instructions -- something that is very important to an employer because they're going to need to train you how to do the job. They don't expect you to come in knowing everything. Internships and part-time work experiences are the other big thing they're looking at. If you don't have those, then forget about it. You have to have your feet wet in the field, particularly if it's a competitive field like marketing or entertainment.

    Now, employers will ask you to explain how your education is relevant to the position you're applying for, so it is important that you draw those connections and have a concise, planned out response for that. All majors teach you how to think critically and do research, so at a minimum you should at least be saying that. As long as you have a good, concise response to that question, your major really is not going to be an issue.

    Having said all that, there are some fields where your major and course work really does matter, such as accounting, engineering, or health professions. If you're wanting to go into anything that requires a certification or credentials, then obviously you have to tailor your education to that.
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    Jan 22, 2011 7:22 AM GMT
    I'm totally on board with the OP. I'm a music major right now, in vocal performance. I'm doing it because it really is what I love, and what defines me more than anything else in the world. My closest friends would definitely agree, I was meant to become a professional in the music world.

    So I've definitely had my share of ridicule with questions like "what are you gonna do with that!?" and comments like "have fun making only 30k a year!"
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    Jan 22, 2011 8:05 AM GMT
    It's not "work" if you like what you're doing... but you still get paid to do it!

    I think there's one more thing to consider that hasn't yet been brought up. What level of standard of living do you require? To oversimplify as an example, I have a friend with an engineering background (and job) who wanted to go back to school to pursue a Gender Studies / Queer Theory Ph.D. He is also a "spender": designer clothes, eating out and getting all the latest technology toys. While his academic abilities are good, I don't know that he would have survived living as a student not to mention what he'd have done with that degree. (He ended up applying to a program that accepts something like 2 out of 150 applicants, made the top 10, but - I think a bit to his relief, certainly today if not then - didn't get accepted.)

    One has to distinguish between work/career and a "hobby".
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    Jan 22, 2011 8:15 AM GMT
    I double degree in Management/Marketing and Textile Design

    I'm working as a Creative Apparel Designer R&D

    Its not my dream job yet because I hope to be creative director in the future!!

    And getting that paper is important...You can actually get any job you'd like because as crude as it may sound, that lil paper proves that u are qualified
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    Jan 22, 2011 2:22 PM GMT
    Try not to let what others say about it phase you. Do what you enjoy because a career which lacks passion, becomes just a job.

    A degree proves capability. A lot of people obtain a degree and don't even end up working in that field (often because they don't enjoy it like they thought they would). You'd be surprised just how flexible your options for employment are once you have that little piece of paper.
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    Jan 22, 2011 2:36 PM GMT
    Disasterpiece saidWhen you'll be 45 and still love what you do as a job, you'll be the one laughing at those poor jaded people that chose a job that payed.
    +1
    You may not be able to afford a bunch of nice things, but at least you'll have fun at work.
    If you don't have fun at work, you won't be able to enjoy the nice things anyway because you'll always be stressed out.
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    Jan 22, 2011 2:44 PM GMT
    CalSparkx said Do what you enjoy because a career which lacks passion, becomes just a job.

    A job that lacks passion is still a job that pays the bills and puts food on the table.
    It's nice to be passionate about something but the passion shouldn't make you oblivious to the need to find some link between the passion and your future employability.
    In my case, if I'd followed my passion I'd have sought a career as a musician. But, sadly, it would have been a career of unemployment since passion does not equal talent. Fortunately, I can afford concert tickets thanks to my backup career as a lawyer.
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    Jan 22, 2011 2:48 PM GMT
    Excellent choice for field of study. Don't let the others deter yuo. Do what you love.