Morning fatigue

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 19, 2007 12:51 AM GMT
    If one is exercising and eating well, I would assume in the morning there should be huge amount of energy. However, I always wake up tired in the mornings.

    I do sleep well without interruptions, yet the fatigue in mornings bothers me. I workout in the evenings.

    Please share if you had similar experiences and what have you done to overcome it.
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    Jun 19, 2007 1:31 AM GMT
    Some possible causes:

    1. Speep apnea
    2. Bad sleeping posture, or bad mattress
    3. Depression

    I have always been sluggish in the morning, since I was a little boy. Often times I wake up and go back to sleep and don't remember it. My mind is not clear for at least 15 minutes, and I don't feel really clear until about 6 hours after waking. Eating in the morning makes me nauseated. And I feel this way with any amount of sleep from 6 hours to 12 (I generally get 8). Generally, I feel better the longer I stay up (until about 22 hours).

    I've never found a cause, but the following help:

    1. Bright light and fresh air
    2. Caffeine
    3. Something light to eat, like a granola bar, but only when my stomach starts growling


    Anybody have other suggestions for causes and/or cures?
  • atxclimber

    Posts: 480

    Jun 19, 2007 1:56 AM GMT
    On nights when I rock climb, I usually sleep like a log and wake up still exhausted, physically. Mentally I'm wide awake, but my body is still worn out. I don't think that's abnormal. Or, anyway, it feels like a "good" exhaustion.
  • Starboard

    Posts: 242

    Jun 19, 2007 2:30 AM GMT
    I have never been a "morning person". I curse those few moments between sleep and consciousness every morning. Because of this, I really can't strength train in the morning -- I am so out of it that it's just impossible to focus and find the energy to go very heavy. I am much better at cardio stuff in the AM (I used to row every Saturday morning at 6AM with a masters team -- I luved those workouts).

    The one thing that I've noticed has helped me with my morning fatigue is yoga -- whenever I take a bikram yoga class in the early evening, I sleep like a baby at night and wake up with energy that I usually don't have in the early hours of the day...
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    Jun 19, 2007 2:46 AM GMT
    It's possible you are waking up without knowing it, or having a non-resting sleep. Ask someone to look at how you sleep ( do you wake up and go back to sleep, do you move a round a lot, have jerky, uncontrollable movements). check for sleep apnea, restless leg syndrome and similar things. also how many hours do you sleep? if you sleep longer, is it better?
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    Jun 19, 2007 3:15 AM GMT
    sleeping longer doesnt help. Whether I sleep on couch or I sleep on the mattress, its the same lazy morning syndrome. I don't have any apparent symptoms of depression nor any reason to be depressed.

    Possibly some sleeping issues that are not apparent to me.

    Thanks for the suggestions. I hope my doctor can sort it out.

    I do sleep like a baby, but I dont feel rested.
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    Jun 19, 2007 4:27 AM GMT
    Takes me about an 1/2 hr to hr to really feel like I'm going in the morning. Even when I wake up on my own feeling completely rested, I don't like heading straight out the door to exercise. For me though it usually seems that I feel more sluggish at the cardio than weights, but I reall don't like either right off the bat. Some of my favorite jobs were where I worked in the late afternoon to night and had mornings to myself. Nothing for me beats getting up about 8; lazy around for an hr or so and go work out at 10 or 11.
    Wouldn't hurt to get your sleep checked out, but my guess is that different people are better at different times of the day, and you have to find what works best for you.
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    Jun 19, 2007 6:37 AM GMT
    Go get a sleep study..

    I did, and I discovered alot of things I never knew I was experiencing, such as drop in O2 saturation to mid 80's for over 8 min at a time, or I did not get enough REM sleep, constant turning, etc...

    They can also teach you how to get the best sleep possible, from environmental ro habbits...

    It is worth it...
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    Jun 19, 2007 6:39 AM GMT
    Do you have a regular sleep schedule? As in, do you go to bed at the same time every night, and wake up at the same time every morning? I've found that it's much easier for me to wake up when I have a solid, set sleep schedule so that my circadian rhythms are regular.

    Also, I think tanktop is onto something when he suggests bright light and fresh air. Waking up and immediately stepping outside for a few minutes to soak up some sun and have my body produce Vitamin D helps me when I'm feeling sluggish.

    That being said, even with all that I still take time to wake up in the morning. I think it's just one of those things that you have to live with. Some people will be better morning people, and others won't. Unfortunately for you and I, there's also research that suggests that might be true.

    http://www.rps.psu.edu/probing/morning.html

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/2996364.stm
  • phunkie

    Posts: 325

    Jun 19, 2007 7:53 AM GMT
    The timing of the night meal matters. You need to give proper time for the food to get digested before you hit the sack. If you eat late, then you should go out on a walk.

    Thats the case with me atleast. I've always had sleeping disorders...since childhood. There are times when I wake up fresh even before the alarm rings, and there are times when it takes me 15 minutes to figure out where I am and can still fall asleep even if i don't feel physically exhausted. Lately i've started eating the night meal an hour earlier. That has helped me a great deal.
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    Jul 22, 2007 3:28 AM GMT
    I have the same morning issues as tanktop. I am not fully away for about an hour or two after waking even after I've taken a shower and done the commute to work.

    I typically can not eat anything for at least one to two hours after waiting or I'll get nauseated as well.

    And the few times I've tried working out at the gym early morning caused me to get feel physically ill.

    I'm pretty much resigned to the fact that I'll be half asleep when I wake up each morning, regardless of how much sleep I got the night before. And I stick to working out on my lunch break and a few times after work or late afternoon on the weekends.
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    Jul 22, 2007 5:21 AM GMT
    It sounds like you think you sleep well... could it be that you are just expecting something different from what your body is?

    I think it's important to consider that not everyone is a so-called morning person. I tend to sleep like a rock, even when shifting time zones, but it's typical for me to require several hours after waking up to reach peak energy.

    Keep in mind that there is no requirement that one work out in the mornings. I have read a few studies that suggest men have slightly higher testosterone in the mornings, but that's not the same as energy levels.

    I find that the earliest I can have a full-strength workout is lunch time, give or take. To some degree I think that's the time I need to start metabolizing breakfast... But I also think it's just how my system works. I've always based my workouts on the feedback I receive from my body.

    It's hard to define what you mean by fatigue in mornings. Is it like a desperate, almost-totally-unable to get out of bed feeling, or are you just groggy and low-energy until your body gradually wakes up?
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    Jul 22, 2007 5:31 AM GMT
    Nearly all long distance running races are in the morning, and I mean early morning. I trained my body to respond well to that challenge.

    But as I aged, I found that it's a violent thing, to go from bed, to running a race several hours after. Or, I wonder if it is psychological...that I grew to dread that.

    In any case, unless I am on vacation, I preferentially workout in the later afternoon or evening, both running distance, or weight training.

    John
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    Jul 23, 2007 10:32 PM GMT
    in response to italmusclebtm:

    "It's hard to define what you mean by fatigue in mornings. Is it like a desperate, almost-totally-unable to get out of bed feeling, or are you just groggy and low-energy until your body gradually wakes up?"

    It just depends on the morning; maybe what I did the day before; possibly my immune system fighting something; etc. I'd say about 70% of the time its grogginess upon waking and low energy for the first few hours of the day. The remaining 30% of the time it requires a TON of will power just to roll out of bed.