Resign or Discharge?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 22, 2011 3:33 AM GMT
    I have been placed in a situation at work:

    Discharge: I did admit to this.
    I placed a "lady bug" stuffed animal on an inhabitants dresser as a decoy to get him to bed.

    -This is urban legend that has gone on for at least 4 years (that's all they can track). This is considered abuse by the state.

    They offered me a voluntary resignation. I'm adding an addendum to that.

    I am resigning because you place me in an unsafe work environment that causes stress and isolation.

    NOTE- Unsafe; one door on the house does not lock. I have called management and maintenance myself for four months, nothing has happened. As of my knowledge the door is still not functioning.
    My job is to provide a safe living and functional environment for six mentally retarted/challenged adolescent boys, and this cannot happen without a secure environment.

    I have all my documentation of these phone calls for four months.

    Should I take a discharge or a resignation?

    NOTE-I already made my decision.

    What would you do?

    Half the company does not agree with a discharge.
    This is why they are offering a resignation.
    I want to claim unemployment on this.
    I want to claim this as long as possible.
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    Jan 22, 2011 4:01 AM GMT
    UpperCdn said" I placed a "lady bug" stuffed animal on an inhabitants dresser as a decoy to get him to bed.

    -This is urban legend that has gone on for at least 4 years (that's all they can track). This is considered abuse by the state" [emphasis added]


    What does that have to do with "unsafe working conditions" pertaining to a door? The two sound unrelated.


    you call it an "urban legend" yet you seem to acknowledge you did it. you just do not considr it abusive, while your employer does.



    If you are being pushed out for the first point, your complaint about the door is irrelevant.

    At first blush, it sounds like they feel they have reasonable grounds to fire you but are not certain they can prove it. I am guessing if you resign you will be penalized as far as unemployment insurance goes but you want to avoid the black mark of being fired.

    Either way you are out. If you get fired you may find it difficult to get a new position. you are best to resign voluntarily.






    I'm being called abusive by state rules. This is mandatory discharge.

    My employer has given me the option to resign.

    They have stated many times about my unsafe work environment but have not taken action.

    The guidlines of resigning for a job in Indiana state " unsafe work environment".
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    Jan 22, 2011 8:34 AM GMT
    What the heck is a lady bug animal as a decoy??? I don't get it?!
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    Jan 22, 2011 9:09 PM GMT
    Did you join of your own free will?
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    Jan 22, 2011 9:22 PM GMT
    Resign first so you can collect unemployment then if you think you were unfairly forced to resign hire an attorney.
    I would think that you may have a case as the grounds seem a little shakey..what with them offering either you either a resignation or a dismissal.. points to the fact that they are unsure of themselves and that could be something in your favor if it went to court.
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    Jan 22, 2011 11:04 PM GMT
    hauptstimme saidShould I take a discharge or a resignation?

    NOTE-I already made my decision.

    What would you do?
    Discharge, because I don't give up that easily.
    Resigning would imply that you can't take the heat, especially if you know you're in the right.
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    Jan 22, 2011 11:08 PM GMT
    True_blue_aussie saidDid you join of your own free will?



    Join? It's a job. He was hired.



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    Jan 22, 2011 11:47 PM GMT
    paulflexes said
    hauptstimme saidShould I take a discharge or a resignation?

    NOTE-I already made my decision.

    What would you do?
    Discharge, because I don't give up that easily.
    Resigning would imply that you can't take the heat, especially if you know you're in the right.




    I agree with you !!!!

    Don't resign !!! stand your ground and threaten to file a grievance and drag them all through that process, threaten to call the funding boards whether state or private, make them put up or shut up !!


    I worked for a county board as director of a housing authority funded by US Dept. of HUD, The County had put off maintenance costs onto my agency for a building and grounds that the County had received US HUD money for that had nothing to do with my agency or Housing.

    I talked with my HUD funding rep whom I had a good relationship with at the state HUD office, his anger at the County's lack of interest in the results of their grant money received was palpable !!! He said "if another grant request comes across my desk from that County Office, it will not get my signature"

    I sat on the information for a while until push came to shove and I was pretty much forced into telling the county that I was stopping our expenditure of money on their building and that their lack of interest in it could cost them where future grants were concerned, telling some of what that HUD official had said.

    Well I immediately was accused of threatening their future grants, then my board chairman was called and the country attorney, who told me I had to report to them the name of the HUD official or resign, I refused to do so, they then said they'd fire me for insubordination. I just flat refused again and told them they'ed have to fire me and if they did I'd appeal it.

    that was the end of it right there !!! We never again put out any more time or money on the county's building, I never gave the name of the HUD official and I worked there for nearly 15 years more until I retired. Sometimes you just have to set these people straight, that your not to be messed with, then they leave you alone to do your job.
  • baldone

    Posts: 826

    Jan 22, 2011 11:52 PM GMT
    don't resign..in most states if you resign you do not colllect unemployment benefits..let them discharge you then you can file for benefits
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    Jan 23, 2011 2:22 AM GMT
    UpperCdn saidIf I've misunderstood or have mischaracterised your situaton hauptsimme, I apologise.


    This is exactly right!

    In my state, there are few conditions where resigning can qualify you for benefits. One of these conditions being an unsafe work environment. If I get discharged they can fight it and say I broke company policy.

    i'm sticking to unsafe work conditions.
  • neosyllogy

    Posts: 1714

    Jan 23, 2011 2:26 AM GMT

    Dude... your post is incoherent.
    Seriously, read it. It makes no sense.
    If you read it again and can't tell that it makes no sense ... um, maybe you're being pressured to leave for other reasons.




    hauptstimme saidI have been placed in a situation at work:

    Discharge: I did admit to this.
    I placed a "lady bug" stuffed animal on an inhabitants dresser as a decoy to get him to bed.

    -This is urban legend that has gone on for at least 4 years (that's all they can track). This is considered abuse by the state.

    They offered me a voluntary resignation. I'm adding an addendum to that.

    I am resigning because you place me in an unsafe work environment that causes stress and isolation.

    NOTE- Unsafe; one door on the house does not lock. I have called management and maintenance myself for four months, nothing has happened. As of my knowledge the door is still not functioning.
    My job is to provide a safe living and functional environment for six mentally retarted/challenged adolescent boys, and this cannot happen without a secure environment.

    I have all my documentation of these phone calls for four months.

    Should I take a discharge or a resignation?

    NOTE-I already made my decision.

    What would you do?

    Half the company does not agree with a discharge.
    This is why they are offering a resignation.
    I want to claim unemployment on this.
    I want to claim this as long as possible.
  • Webster666

    Posts: 9217

    Jan 23, 2011 5:34 AM GMT
    beneful1 saidResign first so you can collect unemployment then if you think you were unfairly forced to resign hire an attorney.
    I would think that you may have a case as the grounds seem a little shakey..what with them offering either you either a resignation or a dismissal.. points to the fact that they are unsure of themselves and that could be something in your favor if it went to court.




    You CAN'T collect unemployment if you quit your job.
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    Jan 23, 2011 5:51 AM GMT
    Have you talked to your employer whether they will challenge any unemployment claims if you voluntarily resign (in lieu of termination)? Are there any severance benefits? What about employment verification? If you list them as past employer, what is their policy on verification of past employment? Do they verify reason for separation/termination.

    As someone who works in human resources management, I know for a fact that it wouldn't guarantee you unemployment insurance benefits if you opt termination instead of resignation if your employer is willing to challenge your claim. Then, again this in our state and I don't know what state you live in.