Ideal Body Weight?

  • Vordhosbn

    Posts: 38

    Jun 19, 2007 3:48 AM GMT
    Out of curiosity... What would you consider to be the ideal body weight for how tall someone is? 5"5" - 6"5"

    I'm curious to find out what guys thing someone 5'10" should weigh, idealy.

    5'10": I would say 165-175, but 180 for me.
    Add/subtract 5lbs per inch.

    Also, what is your ideal body fat percentage?
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    Jun 19, 2007 4:55 PM GMT
    Here's a calculator:

    http://www.healthcentral.com/diet-exercise/ideal-body-weight-3146-143.html

    This also debunks the "large frame=destined to be fat" myth.
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    Jun 20, 2007 10:56 AM GMT
    Your ideal weight also depends on what sort of exercise you are doing. Since I started weight lifting I have put on a lot of weight and am now almost out of the "healthy" BMI register. But I don't think the weight is fat at least that's not what i see when i look in the mirror!
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    Jun 20, 2007 11:01 AM GMT
    the answer is there is no such thing.

    Ideal is a perception and there are too many factors to consider within that.
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    Jul 06, 2007 2:20 AM GMT
    The BMI index that exists around the place should be debunked pronto. Its more often wrong than right.
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    Jul 06, 2007 2:50 AM GMT
    I agree with Cooper. Although the BMI dissociates height by having a maximal correlation with weight and minimal correlation with height, it does not distinguish subcutaneous adiposity from other anthropometric characteristics. It is effective for group predictions (marginally better than girth and bone breadth prediction) but not for individual predictions. BMI should be considered as a ponderosity index and not one of relative 'fatness'.

    Until something better is developed, BMI, although 'unreliable' is the most valid height:weight index we have.

    Sorry for my rant, but don't get me started on bf% measurement methods.
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    Jul 06, 2007 3:03 AM GMT
    Damn right, bfg1!

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    Jul 09, 2007 7:10 PM GMT
    According to the BMI, Mike Tyson is considered "obese".
  • atxclimber

    Posts: 480

    Jul 09, 2007 8:19 PM GMT
    Yes, BMI doesn't distinguish between lean and fat mass and is therefore a relatively useless measure for any athlete or bodybuilder, anyone with more muscle mass than an average person on the street.

    Body fat percentage and Lean Body Mass Index are two more useful numbers.

    For guys, a healthy body fat percentage is between say 5 and 20%, or so. If you're much over 20 you're at increased risk for diseases, arthritis, whatever else. Lots of stuff.

    LBMI is calculated just like BMI, it's just you only use your lean mass, not your total mass. So basically take your body fat percentage, remove that much from your mass, and plug the remaining amount into the formula. You want a number at, say, 19 or higher, roughly. If it's much lower, it means you really ought to put on a bit of muscle to keep yourself healthy and mobile and free of chronic pain, etc.
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    Jul 09, 2007 10:01 PM GMT
    Unfortunately there is no valid and reliable method to calculate body fat percentage. Skinfold measurements, any anthropometrical method, and bioimpedance are all doubly indirect methods, derived from body density. Body density, DEXA, etc are all indirect methods based on cadeaver studies. To top it all off, there's only been like 6 cadeavers dissected and calculated for lean body mass.

    There's just too much imprecision to accurately calculate any individual's body fat percentage.