Calif. Doctor Develops HIV Smart Bomb

  • metta

    Posts: 39075

    Jan 24, 2011 10:58 PM GMT
    Calif. Doctor Develops HIV Smart Bomb


    http://hivplusmag.com/NewsStory.asp?id=22112&sd=01/24/2011
  • metta

    Posts: 39075

    Jan 24, 2011 11:12 PM GMT
    ^
    exactly....

    that hospital is about 10 minutes away from me. They specialize in Cancer and are known as a very good hospital. It is great news! I hope that the same will be for humans.
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    Jan 24, 2011 11:17 PM GMT
    yourname2000 saidHoly shit! It would be amazing if this panned out....but I'm sure it will be decades before could turn into an actual human therapy. But still...holy shit!!

    One can but pray... The past track record with these kinds of announcements is not very good. How many like this have we had, that went nowhere?

    On the other hand, if this is validated, I'm not sure about the decades. If they go into human clinical trials soon, and it's proven successful, I could envision under 5 years.
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    Jan 25, 2011 6:26 AM GMT
    not what i think of when i hear hiv bomb
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    Jan 25, 2011 6:29 AM GMT
    yourname2000 saidbig cocks, muscle-bound, forceful fuckers, ---the whole gammut.


    Yes yes- anything to maximize rectal tearing.
    Why not throw in a prince albert while we're at it.

    This treatment is to stop or "knock out" HIV- so HIV+ individuals would be the main- if not only- subjects.
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    Jan 25, 2011 10:15 AM GMT
    I think it's fair to be skeptical, but decades, really? Come on people. That's cynicism to the point of foolishness. HIV has only been around for a few decades and look how far science has come since. And that was when scientists were literally shooting randomly in the dark to try and find something that works. Now that we actually have promising leads, there's no reason why a legitimate cure couldn't be found within this decade. I mean, first we had the Berlin patient, now these HIV bombs...we're getting close.
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    Jan 25, 2011 10:59 AM GMT
    This is a typical example of the lay media distorting reality for attention-grabbing headlines.

    The published study results are available here: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21248316

    The in vivo aspect of the studies focused on in the news article was based on a total of 34 mice:
    - Treatment from weeks 4.5-9.5 post-HIV infection: 19 mice (2 uninfected controls, 5 untreated, 6 siRNA only, and 6 chimera A-1).
    - Treatment from weeks 5.5-8.5 post-HIV infection: 15 mice (3 uninfected controls, 3 untreated, 3 mutant chimera A-5, 3 aptamer A-1, and 3 chimera A-1).

    This study demonstrates a novel method to target a HIV-1 envelope protein (proof-of-concept paper). However, the timespan between now and a possible therapy for humans infected with HIV is quite long. First, further studies will need to be done by other research groups around the country/world in order to replicate and validate the results of Neff et al (this could take a few years). Second, the technology for producing the aptamers will need to be improved in order to be able to make them more cheaply (much larger volumes of the aptamers will be needed for subsequent experiments). Third, support will need to be acquired (via the NIH, venture capitalists, etc.) in order to provide the funding necessary for pre-clinical studies. Hundreds or thousands of mice (and perhaps larger mammals such as pigs, dogs, or monkeys) will need to be experimented on to provide clinically significant results for the FDA approval process (very expensive step). Fourth, the FDA will need to thoroughly review the pre-clinical data to ensure that all possible side effects and risks have not been overlooked (this back-and-forth with the applicant could take another few years). Fifth, more support will be necessary to fund the clinical trials. But here's the catch: proof-of-concept in a non-human species (even those with "humanized" immune systems) does not guarantee success in humans. Phase I-IV clinical trials can take many years (per phase). Assuming that the product and dosing are proven to be safe and efficacious in humans, it could then be made available to HIV+ individuals who can afford it.

    The above is only a synopsis of the steps necessary to transform the findings of a single study into a possible treatment for humans. The lay media doesn't provide enough (if any) caveats in its reporting of scientific and medical discoveries, leading its consumers to have unrealistic expectations.

    We should certainly remain optimistic about future cures for human diseases, but at the same time be practical about the real-world obstacle course that needs to be traversed from initial discovery to widely available therapy.