Thunderstorms....

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 19, 2007 5:02 PM GMT
    In Cleveland, where no matter how many times you shower you can never feel clean, we are presently having a TREMENDOUS Thunderstorm...

    I LOVE them.... what does everyone else think? And where are the BEST thunderstorms to be found?

    El Tigre (is feeling random today)
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    Jun 19, 2007 5:48 PM GMT
    The best thunder (and lightening) storms are witnessed from the Jersey side of the Hudson facing NYC. When you see lightening dance across the top of that cityscape, it's a sight to behold.
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    Jun 19, 2007 6:21 PM GMT
    Love thunderstorms, and don't get nearly enough of them in Southern California. As a child in Africa we had very impressive thunderstorms, and I have great memories of lying in bed listening to a passing thunderstorm, and then falling asleep to the sound of water dripping off the eaves as the storm would fade into the distance.
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    Jun 19, 2007 6:32 PM GMT
    The best thunderstorms are found far, far away from here. They start wildfires and cause all kinds of grief.
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    Jun 19, 2007 6:36 PM GMT
    Well, boys...that's my research area. Severe thunderstorms and tornadoes.

    Best such storms are in the Great Plains, from early May to late June. Best lightning producers are in New Mexico/Arizona....with a secondary maximum in Florida...those states...in mid summer to August or so.

    John
  • jc_online

    Posts: 487

    Jun 19, 2007 6:41 PM GMT
    I used to live in Cleveland and watching a storm come across Lake Erie toward the downtown area is awesome!

    There's nothing like cuddling on a porch swing during a thunder storm/downpour!

  • mcwclewis

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    Jun 19, 2007 7:21 PM GMT
    Im in the middle of a Mother Nature masterpiece right now. I LOVE storms, as long as its not freezing cold.... which its not right now.
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    Jun 19, 2007 7:55 PM GMT
    I used to live over there in Ohio. Near Warren. Now I live out west and there are no good storms. It really sucks, but it is funny how people THINK they know what thunderstorms are like. The one reason I couldn''t stay out here is the lack of rain.
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    Jun 19, 2007 8:31 PM GMT
    sickothesame, admittedly the palouse is very dry, but I've been caught in more than one spring-time thunderstorm in the Colfax area when driving to and from Spokane. Plus at this time of the year when the hills are a wind-whipped sea of green, I think it is one of the most beautiful places on earch.

  • Jun 19, 2007 8:36 PM GMT
    You are missing the really awesome part about watching a storm come in over lake erie.. the Waterspouts... Nothing like watching a mini tornado of water walking across the lake...
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    Jun 19, 2007 9:49 PM GMT
    I was downtown working. Got to see those roll right in. Wish I was home enjoying the action.
  • treader

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    Jun 19, 2007 10:00 PM GMT

    Having lived most of my life in Chicago, there was usually a very strong thunderstorm near the end of April (which agrees with fastprof's remarks). Literally a cloud blast with thunder so loud that it would make you jump. The plants would literally grow in response and the city would have a bright green glow about it after being brown for the entire winter. The storm would jump start spring in many ways.

    Living in Boston now for several years, it rarely thunders - just rains with lighting. When I first moved here, the lack of thunder really threw me.
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    Jun 19, 2007 10:09 PM GMT
    As treader says...Chicago is near the biggest action for severe thunderstorms, but the effects of the lake can mitigate the threat. Just go further west into Wisconsin/Minnesota and you're right in the northern fringes of tornado alley, and south and east too.

    As for Boston...thunderstorms that have weaker updrafts will tend not to have as much cloud to ground lightning as their stronger, buffer cousins... :-) All lightning produces thunder...but in those weaker thunderstorms, much of the lightning is from cloud to cloud or within the cloud far above the ground. The thunder will be very muffled...or apparently absent (because once lightning is four miles away or so, you won't be able to hear the thunder produced).

    And to mindgarden and the others east of the Cascades...that area, including the Palouse, is occasionally severe thunderstorm territory...

    (BTW: severe thunderstorm -- either hail > 3/4 inch and/or straight line winds equal to or greater than 57 mph and/or tornadoes (or waterspouts, which is a tornado over water). All thunderstorms are dangerous, even non-severe ones, because, by definition, all thunderstorms have lightning, which obviously can kill).

    Thunderstorms represent one of the most violent manisfestations of nature on this planet...with tornadic supercells being at the top of the list....

    John
  • allamericantx

    Posts: 140

    Jun 19, 2007 11:10 PM GMT
    We've had a great storm season so far this year(TX). It's been great with lots of hail and funnel clouds/tornadoes these past few months. One storm blew through the other week and the lightning was like being at a rave. Nonstop stobe lights in the sky. My sliding glass doors were bowing in and out from the winds and intensity.

    Funny story: while living in the Bay Area (San Francisco) a few years back, a thunderstorm blew through one night and the morning news the next day reported the 911 system having an absolute meltdown due to the number of calls from people believing that we were being attacked by terrorists. Thunderstorms happen rarely if ever in the Bay Area and people thought the thunder were bombs in the middle of the night. 911 was flooded with calls and it temporarily shut the system down due to the volume of callers.

    I had never lived anywhere where the weather was so consistently sunny that people mistook thunder for Al Qaida nuking us. That's when I realized I really missed my thunder and lightning and had to move back to TX. LOL

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    Jun 20, 2007 12:15 AM GMT
    I live in california, not too many of them. but when they come around, i love them. The sound of the boom and the look of the lightning lashing out like a snakes hungry tongue sniffing out it's next prey. It's such a poetic and beautiful thing to behold.
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    Jun 20, 2007 12:40 AM GMT
    Well your storm has made it to Pennsylvania, lol... I love thunderstorms, sitting on the porch now actually while it's storming. I like the storms we get here cause I live in the laurel highlands (near Pittsburgh, only more hilly lol) It just makes it better I think... Especially when you hear the thunder roaring thru the valleys.
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    Jun 20, 2007 2:19 PM GMT
    Living in the middle of Kansas, we get more than our fair share of thunderstorms. lol In the last month we've ranged from gentle rain with T&L to torrential downpour, high winds and booming thunder. I haven't really experienced a thunderstom anywhere else so i'm kinda biased, but here in the central plains we have some of the coolest weather.
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    Jun 20, 2007 2:24 PM GMT
    We recently moved here to AZ from SoCal and can HARDLY WAIT for the (what the locals call) Monsoon Season which brings HUGE thunderstorms. Can hardly wait!!!
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    Jun 20, 2007 3:48 PM GMT
    ww1969, even meteorologists refer to it as the "Arizona Monsoon". It's really a change in the type of air masses, and direction of air currents that creates conditions favorable for thunderstorms.

    That said, hopefully, you are not in Phoenix, because although you will see lots of distant thunderstorms, only a relatively few make it over the Valley of the Sun. Tucson is a better large city to get thunderstorms drifting from the mountains.

    On the other hand, if you are in Flagstaff, on the Mogollon Rim, or in the higher area of Arizona, you will be in "fat city" for thunderstorms.
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    Jun 20, 2007 3:56 PM GMT
    People think I'm absolutely crazy, but I love watching lightning and tornados. True they are destructive and cause all kinds of problems, but I still like looking at them.
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    Jun 20, 2007 4:19 PM GMT
    <>
    in Scottsdale, so Iguess that means NO T-storms other than those over the hills in the distance. I would rightly assume it is monsoonal moisture, what with the Gulf of California (warm, shallow water) and the Colorado Plateau (one long, high ramp of terrain) the highlands would get some impressive systems...
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    Jun 20, 2007 4:29 PM GMT
    I agree with treader.

    I grew up on the East Coast, lived in a couple of years in Germany, spend twelve years in Chicago, and now live in Massachusetts.

    Chicago storms are by far the most impressive I've experienced. My apartment building was struck by lightning there once---bricks went flying all over the place!
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    Jun 20, 2007 4:43 PM GMT
    ww1969, yes it's moist air from either the Gulf of California or the Gulf of Mexico...and you'll get some thunderstorms in Scottsdale...so don't worry about that. It's just that the thunderstorm formation process is maximized over the mountains and highland areas. Thunderstorms form over the mountains and then can drift over the Phoenix area.

    The combination of favorable air masses and circulation patterns gradually develops in the late Spring, but its usually just after the solstice that these things are phased properly for thunderstorms to form. This appears in the rainfall record of Arizona stations as a "singularity"---meaning an apparently abrubt start or occurence of something....usually around the last week of June or first week of July.

    I still remember the violent thunderstorms we experienced on the south rim of the Grand Canyon when we were kids on vacation....
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    Jun 20, 2007 5:02 PM GMT
    You get the thunderstorms as far West as Coachella valley, the East side of the San Bernardino Mtns. and up into the Mojave desert around Barstow and the surrounding areas in California. Also the same effects that produce the June to September rainy season in Mexico.
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    Jun 20, 2007 5:21 PM GMT
    I know this may be getting to be a "Yawn" topic for some of you, but those of you really into thunderstorms...

    ...the term "monsoon" doesn't refer to rainfall, really, but a three dimensional wind system resulting from the different cooling/heating rates of the continents and oceans. During the summer, this brings air masses favorable for thunderstorm development over the continents.

    See the National Weather Service's brief description of the Arizona Monsoon (but, as others have pointed out this pattern is associated with thunderstorms as far west as the eastern slopes of the CA mountains in the summer, sometimes even over the Bay Area).

    Arizona Monsoon