Flesh tunnel piercings????

  • tajsreve

    Posts: 418

    Jan 28, 2011 6:29 PM GMT
    I have never been a fan of the huge ear piercings. I always think about how that is going to look when your old. Anyway, I just saw something that actually makes sense, at least for some people I think it is kind of cool.
    opinions?????

    http://studioblog.designaffairs.com/?p=220

    ear-ring1.jpg
    ear-ring-2.jpg
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 28, 2011 6:33 PM GMT
    That is kinda cool. Instead of trying to hide it, just flaunt it and make a statement. icon_cool.gif Given how loud I listen to my music, I'm probably going to need one in a few years.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 28, 2011 7:34 PM GMT
    how interesting! I agree never been a fan of these piercings, but as a earing aid, its actually kinda cool
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 28, 2011 7:40 PM GMT
    Do they only come in 0+?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 29, 2011 4:16 AM GMT
    I going to get a gold-plated ear trumpet with lots of Swarovski crystals.
  • neosyllogy

    Posts: 1714

    Jan 29, 2011 4:24 AM GMT
    Sweet! icon_cool.gif
  • mizu5

    Posts: 2599

    Jan 29, 2011 4:45 AM GMT
    I miss mine. I'm at like a 12 now, but I gotta go back to 0
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 29, 2011 5:19 AM GMT
    Well, it's just a design concept, as I understand this. For up to a moderate hearing loss an in-ear hearing aid is adequate, and it captures sound in a directional manner similar to the way an unaided ear does. For a slight hearing loss the hearing aid can be quite tiny, and nearly invisible. Indeed, my first pair was so small they had little nylon pulls on them so I could extract them from deep in my ear canal.

    My later ones have been larger, and even have had double microphones in each for better directionality, which I can control with a switch. In a noisy environment, where I want to concentrate on a sound source directly in front of me, such as a person speaking to me in a crowd, I can turn off the rear mics to favor front sounds.

    Even better, when telephoning in a noisy place, I turn off their ambient sound capturing ability completely, switching to phone mode. Then the aids create sound solely from the magnetic field that modern phones must emit (at least those sold in the US). This is what is known as "hearing aid compatible."

    The aids will then act as ear plugs, blocking ordinary ambient sounds, so that I hear only the "sound" coming from the phone via silent magnetic waves. As a result, I can listen to a phone in a crowded place better than most people who need no hearing aids, without having to plug my free ear with a finger.

    I'm considering a larger behind the ear model next time, however. As this design concept in the OP states, it's outmoded to hide one's disabilities. And a big problem for me with in-ear aids, even though custom-molded to my ear canal, is that they still feel like big lumps in there, and get uncomfortable after a while.

    Instead, the behind-the-ear model uses a little tube to a small earpiece, like this concept does. It can also be perforated to promote air flow inside the ear, a problem I have with the in-ear aids, that totally plug the canal except for small relief passages in their bodies (and which have to be periodically cleared of ear wax with special tools).

    The main disadvantage of behind-the-ear is directionality. Another solution used to be hearing aids in eyeglass temple pieces, and I do wear glasses. But the frames had to be super big and thick, not an acceptable style today.

    But I'm afraid stretching my ear lobs like a primitive tribesman is not an option I think I'll ever consider, even if these do go into production. And given the age demographic of the majority of hearing aid users, I somehow doubt there'll be much of a market for this in the US, even among women.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 29, 2011 6:23 PM GMT
    One cosmetic surgeon I knew who had a subspeciality in reconstructing ears said he saw huge income potential when we that trend started.

    He did a surprising amount of reconstructive surgeries for ears. icon_eek.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 29, 2011 7:10 PM GMT
    I used to have a 4ga flesh tunnel in one ear. The day after my 48th birthday, I looked in the mirror and decided that at 48 I really didn't need to look like that any more. Since then, the hole has closed up quite a bit, but there's still a small opening through which I can look through.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 29, 2011 9:47 PM GMT
    That is neat!

    I'm actually really excited for stuff like this!
    Having 00's myself, and being deaf when I was younger, I can honestly say I would stretch out my ears more to have that style AND a proper hearing aid if I were still deaf!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 30, 2011 2:43 AM GMT
    HMMMMM...
    Trimic. First off, there is no evidence that directional microphones make significant difference in speech intelligibility. Only in sound booth, but in the real world it's very minimal.

    This is a very interesting concept that I will bring up next week in my amplification class.

    80% of my hearing aid fittings (HAF) consist of 50+ in age. I don't know many 50+ that have this type of piercing. I'm also wondering which company came out with this design. By placing a mic in the ear lobe it eliminates Head Torso Related Transfer Function (HTRF). Bad idea. There's a reason why our ears our shaped the way they are. We shouldn't add to them.

    There are many better options out there, and I can't see someone with a profound loss ever benefitting from this device. Mild to moderate loss really are very hesitant to even add amplification because of distortion.

    Now to add the maintenance. Hearing aid companies make no money off of maintenance unlike the car industry. The cleaning involved and battery upkeep; I'm guessing it takes a size 10 battery that will only last one week. The skin cell buildup would be incredible and would possibly cause mic blockage often. This in turn would require send-in for repair.

    I see hearing aids everyday of my life. This won't hit the mass market. It's too risky, and it's a bad idea.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 30, 2011 3:02 AM GMT
    hauptstimme saidBy placing a mic in the ear lobe it eliminates Head Torso Related Transfer Function (HTRF). Bad idea.

    I hadn't thought about that with this design concept. I've worn in-ear hearing aids for over 15 years, and as I wrote above, I'm considering getting behind-the-ear for my next pair. (I get them free from the VA, but I can't just go in, sit down and talk about my options like you can with a private audiologist)

    Do behind-the-ear also have an HTRF issue, and what about directionality? I hate those big lumps in my ear canal, and thought the smaller plug would be more comfortable, especially since I see some of them have openings that let the ear "breathe" better. My ear canals get all moist and waxy with in-ear hearing aids.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 30, 2011 3:18 AM GMT
    I have a severe hearing loss in both ears (severe/profound in my right), but I couldn't see myself getting a flesh tunnel just as a novel way to wear my hearing aids.

    At the moment, I have behind-the-ear Siemens Cielo 2 SP aids. Because of the level of amplification I require, I need a mould that will form a firm seal with my ear canal to reduce escaping noise and feedback (sounds like squealing and is very unpleasant). This proposed model seems to have quite a small one :S

    Anyway, I probably need to start shopping around soon for a new model which is going to be $$$ with my level of hearing loss. I used to get my models completely subsidised from the government, but this ceased once I turned 21. Damn things wear out fast when you wear them and keep them operating all day, everyday!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 30, 2011 3:30 AM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    hauptstimme saidBy placing a mic in the ear lobe it eliminates Head Torso Related Transfer Function (HTRF). Bad idea.

    I hadn't thought about that with this design concept. I've worn in-ear hearing aids for over 15 years, and as I wrote above, I'm considering getting behind-the-ear for my next pair. (I get them free from the VA, but I can't just go in, sit down and talk about my options like you can with a private audiologist)

    Do behind-the-ear also have an HTRF issue, and what about directionality? I hate those big lumps in my ear canal, and thought the smaller plug would be more comfortable, especially since I see some of them have openings that let the ear "breathe" better. My ear canals get all moist and waxy with in-ear hearing aids.


    I'm not sure what you mean by 'directionality', but I've managed to hear fine with behind-the-ear aids since I was 7 years old.

    Some models have the option to change from an 'omnidirectional' microphone to a 'directional' microphone which will cut out background noise and only amplify sound in the direction you're facing.

    I really appreciate the telecoil phone option, but so many popular and modern mobile phones are not hearing-aid compatible, especially Apple's iPhone and HTC's Desire. I'm heavily reliant on SMSing and sometimes choose not to answer the phone because I won't hear the other person on the other line.

    The opening in the moulds for behind-the-ear aids is incredibly helpful, especially if you live in a humid and warm climate. An audiologist once forgot to order the drainage hole in new moulds that I needed, and I ended up suffering the worst bout of ear infections I've ever had. Also, for wax, make sure you see your doctor every six months in case you need to get your ears syringed. I tend to get a lot of wax build-up, and when it solidifes under the compression of the ear moulds, it can be very difficult to remove without medical help, and also causes further temporary hearing loss.
  • tajsreve

    Posts: 418

    Feb 01, 2011 3:41 AM GMT
    People are always telling me that I need hearing aides. Ambient noise is my nemisis.The comments from all of you who have or know about hearing aides are interesting and helpful to me as far as learing more about hearing aides in general. However, I posted this, not because I thought that I would want a flesh tunnel or that I thought these were a better concept, but because I admire when people think outside the box... so to speak. I love technology and new design concepts and Art deco is right this is just a concept. I too doubt that it would ever fly. My first boyfriend was deaf and we had several discussions about Coclear implants and how deaf people view them. Be that as it may, after being around someone who couldn't go without hearing aides I learned alot about them...and was astounded as to their astronomical cost. I believe that with more people thinking outside the box maybe things will change. If you know what I mean.
  • swimmermatt10...

    Posts: 281

    Feb 01, 2011 3:45 AM GMT
    ShinyToyTrev saidThat is neat!

    I'm actually really excited for stuff like this!
    Having 00's myself, and being deaf when I was younger, I can honestly say I would stretch out my ears more to have that style AND a proper hearing aid if I were still deaf!


    Cochlear Implant?
  • tajsreve

    Posts: 418

    Feb 01, 2011 4:47 PM GMT
    Cochlear Implant?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cochlear_implant
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 01, 2011 5:12 PM GMT
    kangourou saidI'm not sure what you mean by 'directionality', but I've managed to hear fine with behind-the-ear aids since I was 7 years old.

    Thanks for your answer, as a wearer of the BTE aids I'm considering. By directionality I wondered if they would favor sound to the rear, the side, or could sufficiently amplify sounds to the front, since they reside behind the ear lobe.

    My latest ITE pair from the VA, as I wrote above, have 2 microphones each, and a button to control them. I can cancel the back mics, using only the front to bias my hearing to the front as needed. Otherwise the digital circuitry is supposed to balance the front & rear mics for a natural listening experience.

    My own experience is that the front-mic setting doesn't work very well, so I usually leave them on 2-mic automatic. The non-acoustical telephone feature is very nice, though it appears not to work on my iPhone. That would be the only phone I've had in years that couldn't do that, and I thought it was required in the US. I think the iPhone uses the audible frequencies best for hearing aids, but not the silent magnetic field transmissions my aids can exploit.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 01, 2011 5:18 PM GMT
    this company is smart as hell!
    Think about how many young people have plugs and what not.. well their going to get old and want something like this!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 01, 2011 6:07 PM GMT
    Art_Deco said The non-acoustical telephone feature is very nice, though it appears not to work on my iPhone. That would be the only phone I've had in years that couldn't do that, and I thought it was required in the US. I think the iPhone uses the audible frequencies best for hearing aids, but not the silent magnetic field transmissions my aids can exploit.


    Looks like there are ways to add back that magnetic loop function with phones that don't have it internally:

    http://www.tecear.com/Neck_loop_ear_hook_guide.htm
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 01, 2011 6:27 PM GMT
    And in 5 years

    when the technology has those hearing aids

    the size of a kernel of corn...........


    You'll be left with that hole in your ear.