Lower back injury/Frustration/Coping?

  • Patroclus77

    Posts: 28

    Jan 29, 2011 4:08 PM GMT
    So...I have a lower back injury of some type, seeing a physiatrist and getting some PT for it, which seems to be gradually helping. However, I do have flare ups and have one right now triggered by some high impact cardio I had no business doing.

    How do the rest of you cope with injuries that keep you from working out? I think I can feel myself growing fatter as I sit here and type this.

    Must I sit at a recumbent bike and pedal?

    p.s. seeing physiatrist again and an MRI is probably in the cards....
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    Jan 29, 2011 5:38 PM GMT
    Sorry, but you're seeing a what? There's no such word. Typo?

    Boy, I wouldn't jump to excess and get an MRI. Physiotherapy and chiropractic instead. In fact I highly recommend a chiropractor. Does me wonders. Both for injury treatment (combined with massage) and long-term maintenance.
  • Patroclus77

    Posts: 28

    Jan 30, 2011 3:41 AM GMT
    Not a typo, a physiatrist is an MD who did their residency in physical medicine and rehabilitation.
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    Jan 30, 2011 2:13 PM GMT
    my bad. In all my years working in public health, I'd never come across the term.
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    Jan 31, 2011 2:02 AM GMT
    Dude, injuries are the worst. I'm actually dealing with an nagging anterior deltoid strain. It fucking sucks! Anyway, the best recommendation I'd give you is to find a pool and swim. Swimming is the ultimate rehab tool. Hope you feel better!
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    Jan 31, 2011 6:09 PM GMT

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  • metta

    Posts: 39099

    Jan 31, 2011 6:33 PM GMT
    I injured my lower back about 17 years ago from doing squats improperly....just a bad angle that put too much pressure on my lower back. icon_redface.gif (It always freaks me out when I see people hopping and jumping up and down when they do squats....I did not do that but I can see how that could put too much pressure back there.)

    It can take a long time to heal and I stopped doing squats for a long time. And each time I re-injured it, it became easier to injure it again and took more time to recover.

    So I avoided anything that gave me a twinge of pain on my back. When I started to feel pain, I would take some ibuprofen and that always seemed to take care of it. (pain management) I found that when the weather was colder, it was more sensitive. Over time, I gradually did stretching, lower back exercises and abs strengthening. I don't really have back problems any more but I'm still pretty careful to listen to my body. I do feel stress on that area occasionally when I over stress that area when I'm doing stuff in the garden. But I'm still pretty careful.


    I'm also careful with my joints. I avoid exercises that involve pounding on the joints. But that's another issue.
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    Jan 31, 2011 6:57 PM GMT
    I've had lower back problems since a junior in high school (dark ages), spondylitises, due to a misshaped bone. Depending if you have trauma or a chronic problem, exercise may be good to build the muscles for support of the lower back. My problems flare up on occasion but generally not from my workouts but from lifting, despite my efforts to lift properly.
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    Jan 31, 2011 8:47 PM GMT
    I've had chronic back pain, at once debilitating, for 12 years and I've been through the ringer trying to find my way to well: epidurals, failed surgeries, physical therapists and chiropractors galore. It took me the whole of 10 years to read a book I've been recommended time and again called Healing Back Pain: The Mind-Body Connection by John E. Sarno and it pretty much changed my life and how I found my way to pain free, herniated disc and all. Perhaps it could help you. Other than that, I find swimming to be the most effective workout, back pain or no. I hope you feel better.
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    Jan 31, 2011 8:49 PM GMT
    UGH. Don't do cardio or any type of impact activity. Stick to a recumbant stationary bike, swimming, or elliptical trainer. Also, stay away from any activity which loads your spine with weight (leg press, squats).
  • metta

    Posts: 39099

    Jan 31, 2011 8:58 PM GMT
    catfish5 saidUGH. Don't do cardio or any type of impact activity. Stick to a recumbant stationary bike, swimming, or elliptical trainer. Also, stay away from any activity which loads your spine with weight (leg press, squats).


    I agree, stay away from exercises that pound on your back like the treadmill, running on the track, etc. Cardio activities like elliptical, swimming, stationary bike should be fine. I was fine with the stairmaster as well.

    Once the pain goes away, yoga can help to strengthen your core as well.

    Being that I have some friends that are more than 40 years older than me, I have seen how important it is to protect your joints as well, which is one of the reasons why I say that bigger is not always better (from another thread) because of what one has to do in order to continuously get bigger.
  • Patroclus77

    Posts: 28

    Feb 03, 2011 11:44 PM GMT
    Thanks everyone....fantastic advice and great support. My physical therapist has come up with some good ways to help out with the herniated disk and I am getting a friend to teach me to swim laps this week. Starting lifting again this week but light for now.

    Now to just find a flattering bathing suit....

    icon_smile.gif

    Thanks again,
    Patroclus77
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    Feb 04, 2011 4:27 AM GMT
    The best advice from someone who's been there is...DON'T RUSH. I could've lost 80 pounds in six months instead of 18 if I hadn't had to take six months off seeing a physiatrist, a physical therapist, a chiropractor and an ART specialist by aggravating a degenerative disc and tearing a bicep ligament and rotator cuff. Avoid setbacks by training smartly. Better to take a little longer in reaching your goals than a lot longer. A lap pool, an elliptical, an inversion table and your knife and fork are your best tools. In my case gains from slower progress are more sustainable.
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    Feb 05, 2011 11:53 PM GMT
    Walk...often...actually a whole fucking lot.
    <-- Two herniated disks, L4 & L5.