Fake "healthy, food choices"

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 31, 2011 12:33 AM GMT
    One of our members highlighted the General Mills cereal that did not contain any blueberries and pomegranates yet marketed the cereal as containing them. Then, there's currently a ferocious campaign by Taco Bell to defend it's 36% beef food product as actual beef. (USDA has watered down standards that only require 40% beef for a product to be marketed as containing beef.)

    http://gizmodo.com/5742413/this-is-what-really-hides-in-taco-bells-beef

    I was at Walgreens recently and noticed a whole area dedicated to "healthy" sandwich choices. When I read the labels, all the sandwiches had 36 percent plus amounts of sodium.

    With the plethora of products claiming to be "healthier" choices (when they are not), I truly think we, as consumers, need to take a tougher stance against companies that are selling increasingly "fake, unhealthy" products under the label of healthy.

    By the way, too much legislation defends the food producers and too little defends the consumer.

    Your thoughts?
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    Jan 31, 2011 12:46 AM GMT
    Always read labels. There is a program here in Canada, not sure if in the US, where the Heart & Stroke Foundation lets their logo be used on various food products from various large manufacturers. Looks good.. Well it's not.. Turns out that those manufacturers pay the Heart & Stroke Foundation to use their logo and while the products fall within what the H&S Foundation claims are acceptable they are in many cases not the best choice at all compared to other brands of similar products on the shelves.
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    Jan 31, 2011 1:34 AM GMT
    After living overseas for almost a decade, I was mortified when I returned to discover that most of the products passing as juice in the US are fakes. A 'mango peach' juice will be 30% grape, 30% apple, 20% sweetener, 10% peach, 10% mango, and sundry colors and flavors. What the hell? This product would have been sold as a 'fruit nectar' or 'fruit drink' ten years ago, or at least as a 'fruit juice blend'; never as 'mango peach juice'. It's just like the credit card interest rates! What the hell happened? icon_mad.gif
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    Jan 31, 2011 3:18 AM GMT
    When you read the ingredients on processed foods, the ingredients are listed in order of content/proportion. So to use the Taco Bell beef as an example, the first 3 ingredients are: beef, water, isolated oat product. Of course the misleading thing is, how much of each makes up the whole. According to the lawsuit only 36% is beef. And the rest of the ingredients are just a numbers game to make sure that beef remains listed as the primary ingredient. Otherwise, the label would read: Fillers, spices, beef, water.
  • JDean

    Posts: 166

    Jan 31, 2011 3:24 AM GMT
    I always get confused by threads like this. If ur eating fast food and expecting healthy, you have serious issues. I don't eat processed food nor do i eat fast food unless i'm having an "unhealthy day." who cares if taco bell only uses 36% real meat, it's taco bell. You shouldn't be eating there as a healthy choice.

    How about instead of eating products claiming to be healthy, and eat something like, an apple. It's healthy. "God" allowed it to evolve that way.


    I'm so irritated they put calorie counts on everything now. When i go out to eat, which is not often because i know none of that food is good for you, I know i'm eating like 900000000000000000 calories. I don't like being reminded.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 31, 2011 3:29 AM GMT
    Mmm donuts.
    homer-simpson-eats-donuts-in-hell-more-m
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 31, 2011 3:47 AM GMT
    - Just stick to the outside aisles of your grocery store.
    - If it looks too round or perfect, its not good for u (with the exception of fruits)
    - If it comes in a box, check ingredients, protein and carbs should wayyyyy outnumber the fat and sodium and sugars.
    - If the packaging is really flashy...steer clear.

    Im eating a pack of licorice right now...dont judge.
  • NerdLifter

    Posts: 1509

    Jan 31, 2011 3:50 AM GMT
    A1EX saidMmm donuts.
    homer-simpson-eats-donuts-in-hell-more-m


    Full of win.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 31, 2011 4:43 AM GMT
    Jd22639 saidI always get confused by threads like this. If ur eating fast food and expecting healthy, you have serious issues.


    No one is advocating the eating of fast food. It was one among several examples of companies playing nonsensical games with the food supply. There's a separate thread on Wholefoods sale of genetically modified alfalfa sprouts that are proven to be harmful.

    The objective of the thread is spark discussion on how can we as consumers retaliate against such practices. Personally, I think many in the RJ community do stick to non-packaged products. However, there are many in the non-RJ community who are purchasing products that are marketed as healthy. Isn't it time for consumers to stand up against this?
  • shag91607

    Posts: 62

    Jan 31, 2011 5:05 AM GMT
    marcobruno1978 said
    With the plethora of products claiming to be "healthier" choices (when they are not), I truly think we, as consumers, need to take a tougher stance against companies that are selling increasingly "fake, unhealthy" products under the label of healthy.


    What's sad is that most of these products are healthier than their counterparts, and there's little regulation for wording that can be put on labeling unless it makes a very specific health claim, and then you can still used theory medical articles to back up the claim and have absolutely no clinical fact.

    I get amazed day in and day out at the products that hit my desk at work. I get more and more amazed at what products specifically drive certain categories. It's depressing that people actually buy some of this shit and don't bother to understand what they're eating. "I don't use real butter, I use margarine." Butter is fat additive for food, so when you see 0 calorie, low fat margarine - my mind reads "chemical crap in a tub." But, it'll be the best seller on the shelves.

    I think a lot of people don't understand how FEW people actually make decisions about food choices in the US. I think the last number was 80% of all the food decisions are made by 6 companies? (I'll have to check at work). They just don't give a shit because fat slobs will buy their crap product, semi-health conscious people will buy their healthier "all-natural" product, and the food nazis will buy their organic brand label. Like Quaker? Owned by Pepsi, who owns Taco Bell/Pizza Hut. They also own Cascadian Farm which is 2nd for healthy organic cereals/granola only to Kashi (which is owned by General Mills who makes all those great sugar cereals)...

    The food industry is quite fascinating when you get down to it.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 31, 2011 5:21 AM GMT
    I just love how products like Cool Whip, Crystal Lite, or red licorice braids often still come with banner ads that say things like "now 100% cholesterol free!!" icon_rolleyes.gif
  • DCguy2001

    Posts: 314

    Jan 31, 2011 5:30 AM GMT
    rek91607 saidOwned by Pepsi, who owns Taco Bell/Pizza Hut.


    Pepsi spun off KFC, Pizza Hut and Taco Bell -- they are now owned by "Yum! Brands, Inc." which is traded on the NYSE as YUM.

    (Although Yum! Brands does have a lifetime contract with PepsiCo, which is why Pepsi is sold at most of its restaurants.)
  • shag91607

    Posts: 62

    Jan 31, 2011 5:45 AM GMT
    DCguy1999 said
    rek91607 saidOwned by Pepsi, who owns Taco Bell/Pizza Hut.


    Pepsi spun off KFC, Pizza Hut and Taco Bell -- they are now owned by "Yum! Brands, Inc." which is traded on the NYSE as YUM.

    (Although Yum! Brands does have a lifetime contract with PepsiCo, which is why Pepsi is sold at most of its restaurants.)


    They spun them off in 1997 as Tricon Global which is now Yum brands. They're still the largest stakeholder in Yum is still Pepsi.
  • Vaughn

    Posts: 1880

    Jan 31, 2011 5:48 AM GMT
    beneful1 saidAlways read labels. There is a program here in Canada, not sure if in the US, where the Heart & Stroke Foundation lets their logo be used on various food products from various large manufacturers. Looks good.. Well it's not.. Turns out that those manufacturers pay the Heart & Stroke Foundation to use their logo and while the products fall within what the H&S Foundation claims are acceptable they are in many cases not the best choice at all compared to other brands of similar products on the shelves.


    Capitalism at work.