Phytoestrogens?

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    Feb 01, 2011 6:16 AM GMT
    So, I read that eating broccoli can help stop Phytoestrogens (like in soy), from mimicking estrogen in the body. Are there any supplements devoted to this so that I dont have to eat (so much) broccoli?
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    Feb 01, 2011 2:38 PM GMT


    Yeah love Broccoli myself, and most green vegetables,

    Hate cauliflower, it's like broccoli, but not
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    Feb 01, 2011 2:54 PM GMT
    I don't like broccoli. I'm president of the United States and I don't have to eat it. Oh wait. I'm not president. icon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gif
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    Feb 01, 2011 3:21 PM GMT
    Broccoli has sulfur compounds that the body turns into strong anti-cancer enzymes.
  • jperfit

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    Feb 01, 2011 3:31 PM GMT
    [quote][cite]Caslon17000 said[/cite]Broccoli has sulfur compounds that the body turns into strong anti-cancer enzymes.[/quo



    The chemical your talking about is indol-3-carbinol and you would have to eat around 16 bushels of broccoli daily for it to be anti cancer.
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    Feb 01, 2011 4:13 PM GMT
    [quote]



    The chemical your talking about is indol-3-carbinol and you would have to eat around 16 bushels of broccoli daily for it to be anti cancer.[/quote]


    My personal belief is that health effect are cumulative.... One day, it will all pay off.
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    Feb 01, 2011 4:33 PM GMT
    jperfit said[quote][cite]Caslon17000 said[/cite]Broccoli has sulfur compounds that the body turns into strong anti-cancer enzymes.[/quo



    The chemical your talking about is indol-3-carbinol and you would have to eat around 16 bushels of broccoli daily for it to be anti cancer.

    BULLSHIT! ...and when I had cancer, I had no trouble eating a large cereal bowl of cruciferous veggies nightly to help cleanse my body of cancer cells. It dropped my blood test numbers from alarming high to undetectable in 7 months with no further treatment.

    "How Much Broccoli Is Needed for Cancer Prevention?

    Recent studies have also provided us with a much better idea about the amount of broccoli that we need to lower our cancer risk. At the lower end of the spectrum, it looks like an average of 1/2 cup of broccoli per day-only 22 calories' worth of broccoli! -is enough to provide some measurable benefits. Few people have broccoli on a daily basis. But a 2-cup serving twice a week would still meet this minimum average amount. It's important to remember how little this amount actually in within the context of one week's food. A person eating 2,000 calories per day would be consuming 14,000 calories per week. A 2-cup serving of broccoli twice a week would provide about 178 calories-only 1% of the total weekly calories! At the higher end of the spectrum, studies show that more broccoli might be needed to accomplish other cancer-preventing tasks. For example, one study showed significantly higher urinary excretion of potential carcinogens from well-done, grilled meats given daily consumption of broccoli in the range of 9 ounces (250 grams) per day. That gram amount corresponds to approximately 1.6 cups of broccoli on a daily basis. We've also seen a study showing that "generous" amounts of broccoli can help optimize levels of antioxidants in the blood, especially beta-carotene and lutein. (Optimal antioxidant levels can help lower the risk of oxidative stress in healthy cells, which also helps lower their risk of becoming cancerous.) In this study, the term "generous" was used to describe consumption of broccoli in the amount of 3 cups daily. Once again, that amount would not be ridiculously high in terms of calories-3 cups would provide about 132 calories, or 6-7% of a 2,000-calorie diet. But it might be a greater amount that many people would want to consume on a regular basis.

    For us, the bottom line here is not to treat broccoli like garnish. In recipes like our Asian-Flavored Broccoli with Tofu or 5-Minute Broccoli with Feta Cheese and Kalamata Olives recipes, we use 1 pound of broccoli to provide two servings. That's approximately 1.5 cups of broccoli per serving. There is no reason to shy away from 2-3 cup servings of broccoli when enjoying this cruciferous vegetable, especially if you want to optimize its cancer-preventing benefits. But make sure you're not simply "decorating" your plate with single broccoli stalk and floret."

    http://www.whfoods.org/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=9
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    Feb 01, 2011 8:41 PM GMT
    interestin thing i once saw in pbs, seem dat some people are geneticaly predesposed in taste sensitivity against vegetables, so dat vegetables like brocoli taste more bitter to them dan other people
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    Feb 01, 2011 9:47 PM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidI just made some broccoli soup.

    I sauteed a bunch of broccoli, a whole onion (diced) with a couple garlic cloves and then once caramelized I blenderized all ingredients until a smooth consistency, added some chicken broth, salt and pepper and some heavy whipping cream to taste....MAGNIFIQUE!!!


    Ugh... your recipes always make me hungry. And it's at least 2 hours before I get dinner tonight. icon_neutral.gif