Anyone diagnosed with cancer

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 03, 2011 3:49 AM GMT
    Just wondering who out there was diagnosed with cancer and survived or is currently facing cancer,
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 03, 2011 5:55 AM GMT
    I had a cancer scare a few years ago. it was pretty scary i just got home from serving overseas and i was getting really sick. the docs just made a mistake i wasnt sick at all.
    Hope all is fine with you !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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    Feb 03, 2011 6:40 AM GMT
    I had (crosses fingers, not officially in remission yet) prostate cancer. I blogged my experience here on RJ:

    http://www.realjock.com/gayforums/150050

    My one advice to anyone with a major disease is to join a support group...live or online. Fellow patients will tell you the truth, while the drs won't.
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    Feb 03, 2011 1:00 PM GMT
    Well, I noticed change and quickly went to the doctor. my suspicions are being confirmed and they are now doing bloodwork and x-rays.icon_confused.gif

    I realize that cancer can happen to even the healthiest of us. lance armstrong is a good example. he is a physiological amazing guy and I am sure that his health aided to his recovery. "Mr. Armstrong's VO2 max is 85 milliliters of oxygen per kilogram of body weight per minute. An average untrained person has a VO2 max of 45 and with training can get it to 60." http://www.nytimes.com/2005/07/24/weekinreview/24kola.html Now that is truly amazing considering his age. My Vo2 is around 58 ml/kg/min and untrained. So if I actually train specifically for cardio, I could likely shift that number a bit. (using new leaf equipment april 2010)

    however, what scares me more is facing this without insurance. icon_eek.gif That is a long story.... So i hope that I dont have to go though chemotherapy.

    then I got to thinking, does this make me a high risk person to insure ?
  • jlly_rnchr

    Posts: 1759

    Feb 03, 2011 1:08 PM GMT
    YoungjockMN saidWell, I noticed change and quickly went to the doctor. my suspicions are being confirmed and they are now doing bloodwork and x-rays.icon_confused.gif

    I realize that cancer can happen to even the healthiest of us. lance armstrong is a good example. he is a physiological amazing guy and I am sure that his health aided to his recovery. "Mr. Armstrong's VO2 max is 85 milliliters of oxygen per kilogram of body weight per minute. An average untrained person has a VO2 max of 45 and with training can get it to 60." http://www.nytimes.com/2005/07/24/weekinreview/24kola.html

    however, what scares me more is facing this without insurance. icon_eek.gif That is a long story.... So i hope that I dont have to go though chemotherapy.

    then I got to thinking, does this make me a high risk person to insure ?

    Thanks to Obama's healthcare reform, it won't matter if you're high risk. They won't be able to hold a pre-existing condition against you. Just gotta wait until 2014.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 03, 2011 1:46 PM GMT
    16 years survivor Stage 3 Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma.. They cut, they burned, they poisoned it... and I'm still here goddammit
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    Feb 03, 2011 1:51 PM GMT
    I fought and beat kidney cancers ass last year and am fighting it again, positivity and support and the "Dana Farber" hospital in Boston are what gets you through it. It's sad cancer doesn't have a cure and it can touch everyone and even children which is the saddest. If you know a person with cancer support them and fight with them.
    '
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    Feb 03, 2011 2:40 PM GMT
    Found a lump in my testicle a few years ago. Had surgery soon afterward. Fortunately, it ended up being benign. But nonetheless, a very difficult time. Thoughts and prayers for all those who are coping with a cancer diagnosis and the effects of treatment.
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    Feb 03, 2011 3:04 PM GMT
    Nobody ever heeds my cancer fighting diet information, but here it is again.

    "What are the benefits of the sulfur compounds found in cruciferous vegetables?

    Broccoli, and the other members of the cruciferous family of vegetables, pack a powerful punch when it comes to cancer prevention. The cancer protective properties of crucifers such as broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, cabbage, and kale are attributed to the fact that these foods contain substantial quantities of the phytonutrients called isothiocyanates, specifically two isothiocyanates called sulforaphane and indole-3-carbinol. Research indicates that sulforaphane has the ability to increase the capacity of the liver to detoxify harmful, cancer-causing compounds. Specifically, sulforaphane increases the activity of the liver's Phase 2 detoxification enzymes. These enzymes (which include glutathione transferases, NAD(P)H: quinone reductase, and glucuronosyltransferases) are well known for their ability to clear a wide variety of toxic compounds from the body including not only many carcinogens, but also many reactive oxygen species, a particularly nasty type of free radical. By jump starting these important detoxification enzymes, compounds in crucifers provide protection against cell mutations, cancer and numerous other harmful effects that would otherwise be caused by these toxins. Research on indole-3-carbinol shows this compound helps deactivate a potent estrogen metabolite (2-hydroxyestrone)that promotes tumor growth, especially in estrogen-sensitive breast cells. Indole-3-carbinol has been shown to suppress not only breast tumor cell growth, but also cancer cell metastasis (the movement of cancerous cells to other parts of the body). ..."


    Broccoli and Cancer Prevention

    The unique combination of antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and pro-detoxification components in broccoli make it a unique food in terms of cancer prevention. Connections between cancer development and oxidative stress, chronic inflammation, and inadequate detoxification are so well-documented in the research that any food improving all three of these metabolic problems would be highly likely to lower our risk of cancer. In the case of broccoli, the research is strongest in showing decreased risk of prostate cancer, colon cancer, breast cancer, bladder cancer, and ovarian cancer. We expect that risk of other cancer types will also eventually be shown to undergo reduction from regular consumption of broccoli.

    http://www.whfoods.org/genpage.php?tname=george&dbid=45

    "How Much Broccoli Is Needed for Cancer Prevention?

    Recent studies have also provided us with a much better idea about the amount of broccoli that we need to lower our cancer risk. At the lower end of the spectrum, it looks like an average of 1/2 cup of broccoli per day-only 22 calories' worth of broccoli! -is enough to provide some measurable benefits. Few people have broccoli on a daily basis. But a 2-cup serving twice a week would still meet this minimum average amount. It's important to remember how little this amount actually in within the context of one week's food. A person eating 2,000 calories per day would be consuming 14,000 calories per week. A 2-cup serving of broccoli twice a week would provide about 178 calories-only 1% of the total weekly calories! At the higher end of the spectrum, studies show that more broccoli might be needed to accomplish other cancer-preventing tasks. For example, one study showed significantly higher urinary excretion of potential carcinogens from well-done, grilled meats given daily consumption of broccoli in the range of 9 ounces (250 grams) per day. That gram amount corresponds to approximately 1.6 cups of broccoli on a daily basis. We've also seen a study showing that "generous" amounts of broccoli can help optimize levels of antioxidants in the blood, especially beta-carotene and
    lutein. (Optimal antioxidant levels can help lower the risk of oxidative stress in healthy cells, which also helps lower their risk of becoming cancerous.) In this study, the term "generous" was used to describe consumption of broccoli in the amount of 3 cups daily. Once again, that amount would not be ridiculously high in terms of calories-3 cups would provide about 132 calories, or 6-7% of a 2,000-calorie diet. But it might be a greater amount that many people would want to consume on a regular basis.

    For us, the bottom line here is not to treat broccoli like garnish. In recipes like our Asian-Flavored Broccoli with Tofu or 5-Minute Broccoli with Feta Cheese and Kalamata Olives recipes, we use 1 pound of broccoli to provide two servings. That's approximately 1.5 cups of broccoli per serving. There is no reason to shy away from 2-3 cup servings of broccoli when enjoying this cruciferous vegetable, especially if you want to optimize its cancer-preventing benefits. But make sure you're not simply "decorating" your plate with single broccoli stalk and floret.

    http://www.whfoods.org/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=9

    My favorite food website: http://www.whfoods.org/foodstoc.php
  • LJay

    Posts: 11612

    Feb 03, 2011 3:44 PM GMT
    First, insurance. Go to you local social services administration and inform yourself. Our city has a teaching hospital which partners with social services. Yours may have also. They are not only generous, they are saints. You can get insurance regardless of pre-existing condition? I am not sure. Find out. It is a matter of law.

    Second, do not diagnose until the test results are in. Even when the results come in, they are always being questioned, modified and reworked. Knowing what is happening is your right and responsibility, but you have no interest in fretting.

    Third, every case is different. The stories are sometimes scary, sometimes helpful and sometimes weird, but they are not your own. Just because 'it happened with someone else' it will not necessarily happen with you.

    You are more than any of this. Work on getting on with your life. That is a great anxiety reducer.

    Good luck!
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    Feb 03, 2011 11:59 PM GMT
    jlly_rnchr said
    YoungjockMN said then I got to thinking, does this make me a high risk person to insure ?

    Thanks to Obama's healthcare reform, it won't matter if you're high risk. They won't be able to hold a pre-existing condition against you. Just gotta wait until 2014.


    I dont think cancer is quite that patient to wait. And once you have an incident, you get to have tons of fun little checkups......to make sure it doesnt come back.

    To LifeFighter: they cant exactly cure cancer because it is just a classification of a disease so it starts for many different reasons and has many different patterns depending on the certain kind of cancer.

    Some kinds of cancer is preventable such as lung cancer by not smoking (sorry to firemen) and colin cancer which eating a diet high in fiber prevents. However some forms such as breast cancer, is more genetic and certain things like breast implants hide cancer. Obviously if you have risks for cancer because of family history, it is important to have more frequent checkups. I did not know that any family members had cancer until I told mom I had cancer and found out that she DID have cancer and kept it under wraps. so...hindsight is 20/20.

    LJay, I have cancer. They are rearranging the schedule to get me in next week. I have gone though the process of public healthcare but I found out that my problem is you HAVE to fail to get connected with other programs and no one tells me that. I hate to say it, but it almost seems to be pick and choose. You need a lawyer to help get you though because it seems that the social workers just tell you "sorry, you dont qualify after conducting an interview."

    after talking to a private clinic about the lack of insurance, THEY actually guided me down the right path and told me that I have to apply and fail so that they can connect me with other people. So Thumbs up for private medicine who actually wants to help you......
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    Feb 04, 2011 12:00 AM GMT
    Thanks for replying guys. All this is great and helpful, especially coming from a community of gay men.
  • motivated

    Posts: 297

    Feb 04, 2011 12:17 AM GMT
    I hope the test results bring good news!

    I am in the medical field specializing in oncology, so if you have any questions about treatment, chemotherapy regimens, things to expect, etc. don't hesitate to shoot me an email.

    Take care!
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    Feb 04, 2011 6:39 PM GMT
    I work for a non-profit benefiting those with cancer. Sending my blessings and thoughts to all of those facing the battle.
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    Feb 04, 2011 11:31 PM GMT
    Good luck with those tests! A pathologist here, so don't know if I can offer much advise outside of diagnostics but feel free to ask any questions.
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    Feb 05, 2011 12:03 AM GMT
    YoungjockMN saidYou need a lawyer to help get you though because it seems that the social workers just tell you "sorry, you dont qualify after conducting an interview."

    ......

    Yeah, I felt like I was living my own episode of Sicko...and I had insurance and drs and a clinic! .... icon_eek.gif
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    Feb 09, 2011 6:53 PM GMT
    just a follow up on this thread.
    I had surgery and things went well. it was only in stage 1 and they think they removed it. I need to do a MRI or cat scan so they can see that it has all been taken care of
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    Feb 09, 2011 7:07 PM GMT
    Congratulations!

    May you remain healthy and blessed.