Bouncing, Speed and Assisting

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 08, 2011 3:42 PM GMT
    I realize that there are occasions for what might be called more brisk movements, though, they are far and few between, right?

    Is it not incorrect to bounce weight off your chest? I can't count how many guys I see daily, not only bouncing, but not controling the weight on the decline. They allow it to fall only to bounce it off of their chest, to "pop it" as I've heard it called.

    Has anyone ever heard of someone cracking their sternum because of this? Not to mention, there's no benefit in not controling the weight, only to opt for the lift alone, right?

    I have a rule. If I'm not able to lift the weight off the bar, never mind actually lifting it at least two to three times, then I'm proabaly not ready for that particular weight or I've burnt myself out. Unless, of course, I'm looking for a max, for which I should be able to lift at least one time.

    And, yet, I see countless guys "lifting" huge amounts of weight, with two to three guys assisting. I'm not talking about a spoter here. I'm talking about two to three guys acutally helping in the lift, the lowering and lift repeat. Where is the benefit?

    If the spoters are making up for 25% of the lift, why not just reduce the weight by 25% or whatever it is and go from there? You're not really lifting the weight anyway, right? Not really. So, again, where's the benefit?

    I've come to realize that I not only benefit more, but I perform better when I focus on quality over quanity or simply "throwing it up". An example is that, whenever lifitng or doing any particular workout, if I feel shaky or am unable to handle the weight "cleanly" or do a quality controled lift, then I still need work. It would not be wise for me to add more weight or seek out two other individuals to lift it for me.

    As a result, I'm not only getting good results, but I feel the difference over all from one week to the next.

    Anyway, if only based on appearance, I'm sure you all are doing what's necessary and the right way. I'm just interested to know what other's opinions are on the matter.
  • geebus

    Posts: 216

    Feb 09, 2011 10:48 AM GMT
    Ok, I'm gonna have a crack at answering these.

    There isn't a "correct" way of performing an exercise unless it leads to structural damage down the track, such as rounding your back during a deadlift. The bounce maybe part of some guy's attempt of using stretch reflex in their training, that or they're training the explosive turn around during the end of the eccentric phase.

    Some people train only in the concentric phase, perhaps to focus on strength gains and efficiency of the lift. It is very difficult to determine whether someone is cheating or they have specific reasons for their lifting style.

    With regards to lifting way more than one otherwise could through "spotters" (I use the word spotter loosely here as they are lifting probably just as much as the "lifter"), that's training their ego haha icon_razz.gif

    Performing clean reps is excellent, but sometimes you need to cheat in order to break through a plateau. Although not necessary, but some people achieve strength or size quicker through cheating.

    As a final note, I'd like to emphasize that there are more techniques in training than one would care to count for. Rep range, movement range, grip, offsets, thickness of bar, tempo, TUT, joint focus (active/ passive insufficiency) and so on and so forth. I tend to give people the benefit of the doubt and assume they know what they're doing unless proven otherwise.
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    Feb 21, 2011 8:25 AM GMT
    I agree that "cheating" might be ok on some lifts because the person might be exhausted or training for a specific action, but bouncing the bar off your chest is just wrong. It doesn't help you in any way. You can't do it in bench press competitions either. If the goal is to make your body stronger, then it is wrong. The problem is that these guys have to take a huge step backwards to do it right and because of their personality, they will die before they go down 100 pounds in the bench. It is best to just do it right all the time. It is safer and you get more benefit out of it. And in the long run, you can become consistently stronger than them and lift until you are 80+ years old. On a personal note, I have benched 420 raw in the 181 class.
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    Feb 22, 2011 2:33 PM GMT
    "It is best to just do it right all the time. It is safer and you get more benefit out of it. And in the long run, you can become consistently stronger than them and lift until you are 80+ years old. "


    Exactly! I realize that there can be alot of pressure, should you allow it, to go well beyond what is... beneficial or actually possible. Though, I believe, as you say, that, in the long run you benefit more from a more appropriate workout. A more steady, solid lift. For me it's a matter of quality over quanity. I'd rather lift my max one solid, unshakey time, than have three spotters "lifting" it three to four for the sake of ego. Where's the real benefit in that?

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    Feb 25, 2011 7:43 AM GMT
    In my eyes, you can't claim to have completed the rep if someone else touches the bar. "I barely touched it".. whatever.They touch it, the rep don't count. If you are doing a weight that someone else has to touch the bar, than it is to heavy. Spotter is supposed to be there for safety, not to assist in completing the lift.