AARRGGHHHHH!!!!! what is your combined utilities bill for this month?

  • rnch

    Posts: 11524

    Feb 08, 2011 8:28 PM GMT
    what is your electric/natural gas/propane electricity and heating bill for the past cycle, relative to what square footage house/apartment/condo?

    my bill, was $205 for electricity and natural gas usage, for a 2000 sq ft house.

    killin' me! more than my car payment.

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    Feb 08, 2011 8:44 PM GMT
    thats cheap...where do u live?
  • rnch

    Posts: 11524

    Feb 08, 2011 8:45 PM GMT
    orlandoguy saidthats cheap...where do u live?


    New Orleans, LA
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    Feb 08, 2011 8:58 PM GMT
    Ours was $61 electrical for a small 1300 Sq Ft condo in south Florida, which I just paid online this past weekend. But we got to keep the AC off, the biggest user, most of the last billing cycle. Yet even in full summer heat it never goes above $90 something.

    When I first moved in here my partner's existing monthly electrical bill was running around $130. But I'm an energy hawk, changed out all the bulbs for fluorescents (I'm now looking at LEDs), made him stop running the 4 ceiling fans 24/7, turn lights off we don't need, and programmed the electronic wall set-back thermostat for the AC, which he had never done.

    I also bought a demand water heater. And bought us a new dishwasher, the existing one broken, to stop our cleaning dishes by hand in the sink (a task I could not tolerate anyway). It may seem counter-intuitive, but a modern dishwasher actually uses less energy than washing by hand, and does a better job at it, too, ours having a certified sanitizing ability.

    So that now, despite a second person living here, with a second computer running all the time, and often watching 2 different TVs, and using more hot water for showers, and more cooking in the kitchen, the monthly electric bill was cut in HALF. It can be done.

    Your problem may be wall insulation, single-pane windows, and air leaks around all the doors and windows, needing thermal shades on windows. Solving that could represent a heavy investment of money. Other than that, all I can suggest is the economies I mentioned above. Plus we could also compare our kilowatt hour costs, because New Orleans may be very high, and that can't be helped.
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    Feb 08, 2011 9:33 PM GMT
    You don't even wanna know.

    Mine was about $2100 for 7000 square feet, but that includes keeping a lot of lab equipment running 24/7, and almost half was propane to heat a large greenhouse in 10-degree weather.

    And I burned a lot of fire wood too.
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    Feb 08, 2011 9:36 PM GMT
    $98.32 for somewhere around 1000 sq ft.
    But, that's just an average for the past 12 months (on averaged billing, auto-pay).
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    Feb 08, 2011 9:42 PM GMT
    wow...why my bill is so high...

    My house is 2500K...ac on once awhile only because we live in florida. But it cost about 190 per months. The house is two stories with about 20 ft ceilings.
  • mizu5

    Posts: 2599

    Feb 08, 2011 9:48 PM GMT
    130 a month in vancouver for 1800 sq ft house

    back in tdot its 210 ish (depends on season) for 3200 sq ft house
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    Feb 09, 2011 6:59 PM GMT
    1650 sq ft. My bill comes every 2 mos. 2 and changed combined.
  • SomeSiciliano...

    Posts: 543

    Feb 09, 2011 7:27 PM GMT

    I am on budget plans at my place in Chicago...220 p/mo for gas year round for 1900 sq feet. Yes, I get screwed in the summer (both months of it) but no fugly $500 surprises when we get brutalized like this winter season. I keep my utilities set to usage market prices for my place in Louisville KY since I am not there as much and the costs and taxes are lower. Worst one so far this season was Dec 2010....about $350 for a 2700 sq/ft house..but was an unusually cold month and I was living there most of the time.
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    Feb 09, 2011 7:27 PM GMT
    $205 combined doesn't seem bad at all. My electric alone was $256 this month. I also had to pay a plumber $215 this week because a tenant at one of my rentals flushed tampons (although that's not a "household utility").
  • ohioguy12

    Posts: 2024

    Feb 09, 2011 7:49 PM GMT
    January for me:

    189 Gas and Electric
    70 for TV (Dish Network)
    40 for Internet
    479 for rent (including water)
    =

    698, which is a lot higher than usual, but thats the price I gotta pay for these long winters
  • rnch

    Posts: 11524

    Feb 09, 2011 10:29 PM GMT
    Art_Deco said...Your problem may be wall insulation, single-pane windows, and air leaks around all the doors and windows, needing thermal shades on windows. Solving that could represent a heavy investment of money. Other than that, all I can suggest is the economies I mentioned above. Plus we could also compare our kilowatt hour costs, because New Orleans may be very high, and that can't be helped.



    i rolled R-30 level fiberglass insulation in the vast, spacious (enough for several more rooms) attic when i bought this historic home, i used most of one year's tax refund to have foam insulation spayed on the underside of the hear of pine flooring, have weatherstripped and covered the 1882 single pane windows with those shrinkable clear plastic sheets from the homo depot, installed a tankless "flow-thru" gas hot water heater, top of the line (in 2005) "high-efficiency" central air conditioning and natural gas central heat.

    my digital "set back" thermostat is at 69 day heat/62 night heat. with the various ceiling vents grille openings adjusted, i maintain to within 1 degree of the thermostat settings in all the rooms.

    the issues i cannot change lie in the uninsulated, plaster walls and the 12 foot ceilings in this old house. it takes a lot of energy to heat up these tall rooms! also, replacing the original circa 1880's single pane windows are forbidden by the historical home commission in this area.

    for years, for decades natural gas rates were so cheap here, peeps would have small space heaters running wide open the 2 or 4 months of cold weather we have here and still only have a twenty or thrity dollar gas bill. the cheap winter heating months were our payback for the high constant use air conditioning bills of july thru october.

    not no more!!!!

    natural gas rates have skyrocketed here in new orleans for the last 5 years. my combined heat and electricity bill for a given january is as high as my constant on air condtitioning electric bill of a given august or september (our peak heat & humidity months here in new orleans).

    ah well.........i knew what i was getting into when i bought this awesome, old, tall ceiling, victorian monster. somehow living in a house that has withstood every hurricane and weather challenge hurled at it in the last century makes me feel snug & secure.



    as the wise man said "it is what it is"!

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    Feb 09, 2011 10:37 PM GMT
    Mine was high for January, up to about $100 for electricity. No gas here. Usually is about 50-60 a month for a 1000 sq ft apt.
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    Feb 09, 2011 10:40 PM GMT
    I think many people in places like the continental US and Canada are very lucky with regards to how much their essential bills are each month. Where I am now (back home in the Caribbean) I help my parents out a bit as I'm living with them for a while, and for 3 people in a 2,500 sq ft house, our bills (water, elec etc) come up to about USD$1100/ month. The electrical bill alone last month was USD$600 of that amount, and water another $350. Now just imagine if we had to rent!That's the price you pay for living on a tiny island. When in Miami and living in a similar sized house with roomates, the total comes up to under USD$500.
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    Feb 09, 2011 10:50 PM GMT
    I use about 250 gallons of propane per year. I heat with wood. The propane is for the refrigerator, range/oven, and on demand water heater. i live 100% off-grid, in a <600 sq ft small cabin. I installed solar electric when I built it and the payout on it (over the average expected life of the components), is just a hair over $13 per month. When I expand it again this spring, it will increase to about $16.00 per month pay back. For water, I collect and store rainwater. If it gets low, I have springs, and ponds.

    So... broke down by month:

    $32 propane
    $13 "electricity"
    $0 water

    $45 Total monthly utility.
  • bchbum

    Posts: 161

    Feb 09, 2011 10:56 PM GMT
    $51 for a 1400 sq ft house. All electric.
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    Feb 09, 2011 11:13 PM GMT
    The 3 primary factors affecting your home energy bills are:

    1. Basic cost of the energy consumed (electricity or gas). And just like gasoline being priced differently around the country, so is energy. It's listed right on your bill and can be compared with other members here. That cost may also be mitigated by discounts for senior citizens and various assistance & incentive programs. And while not actually reducing total annual expenditure, cost averaging programs can protect you from sudden high peaks in your monthly bill.

    2. Home energy efficiency. A broad topic, that includes insulation, window & door sealing, efficiency of the heating/AC unit(s), set-back thermostats, use of florescent & LED lights, supplemental energy sources like solar panels, Energy Star appliances, passive heating & cooling designs, and so forth.

    3. Energy discipline. Keep the temperature as low as tolerable in the winter and as high in the summer. Turn lights and ceiling fans off when the room is empty (you'd be surprised how many people think a fan actually cools the air).

    There isn't much you can do about the first item, aside from taking advantage of any discount programs that may be available to you. You could try lobbying politicians for assistance, but since they're getting more money from the power companies than from you, there's a fat chance of that working.

    Home energy investments can be costly, and outweigh short-term savings. Your projected time of property ownership must guide you there.

    The rest is number 3: up to you. I told the story above of how I reduced my new partner's electrical bill by half (we don't have gas here) after I moved in with him, despite the added costs of a second adult. Investments included a new tankless water heater, and a new dishwasher. But added was this second computer, and things like an electric wine cellar (cooler).

    I remain convinced you can make a big dent in your energy bill if you just put your mind to it.
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    Feb 09, 2011 11:43 PM GMT
    2100 sq ft. Apt

    January.

    $135.00 including: electricity, phone, cell phone, water, parking, gas, cable and Internet.



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    Feb 09, 2011 11:51 PM GMT
    around 30-40 bucks for electricity.
    No heat or water (free)

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    Feb 09, 2011 11:52 PM GMT
    $150 natural gas + $50 electricity=$200 for 2800 sqft 10ft ceilingsicon_sad.gif
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    Feb 09, 2011 11:56 PM GMT
    I know they are pretty bad aren't they. 2300sq ft house. Just gas and electric alone is like over 300.
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    Feb 10, 2011 12:20 AM GMT
    Electricity $79 and gas $38 for 3 months
  • Webster666

    Posts: 9217

    Feb 10, 2011 1:28 AM GMT
    I pay half that, but, in San Francisco, we almost never have to turn on the heat.
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    Feb 10, 2011 5:02 PM GMT
    I hate you all, my heat is paid for and I live in a 750 sf apartment in NYC. I am always good about turning all lights off when not in use (my roommate is not as good), but mine has been around 250 a month all winter.

    PS when I say I don't pay for the heat, the building controls it and so most of the time I have a window open so I don't sweat while wearing basketball shorts around the house.