Is this right???? no more sit ups ???????

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    Feb 09, 2011 9:25 AM GMT

    No more strenuous sit-ups for a washboard stomach - it would be too good to be true! It is true, at least say Lou Schuler and Alwyn Cosgrove, the authors of the new U.S. fitness Bible "The New Rules of Lifting for Abs".



    You think the old-fashioned crunches are in fact almost no effect: "People think, sit-ups are the same as free weight exercises for the biceps," says Schuler. "You take the bar bends his arm, stretched it again and noted already, such as the biceps working at crunches, it is equally. We feel like contract the abdominal muscles during high-coming and believe they would become just as trained as the arms. " This is not true.

    For abdominal muscles are of course not the same as the biceps or the triceps - they are neither in structure nor in function identical to this. The object of the abdominal muscles, it is not about to lift loads or lift weights. They should rather be based in cooperation with the back muscles and keep our spine especially in the pelvis and lower back during all possible moves in a safe, neutral position.

    As a result, no single sit-up-like workout found in her book. One of the abdominal muscle exercises, Schuler and Cosgrove's see - unlike the sweaty crunches - and not just as simply as if it were the ultimate six pack workout: you go in to the push-up position. Instead of resting, but as usual on the palms, which rely now on the forearms, pay attention to your back straight and hold this position easily. To train the lateral abdominal muscles, one turns to the side, is supported only on one arm and the sides of the feet.

    "Keep this basic exercise for a few seconds is really quite simple after 30, 60 or even 90 seconds to realize, however, how little power in the abdominal muscles in truth is -. In spite of a thousand sit-ups, we may in the past have made, "says Schuler.

    Instead of crunches and similar exercises for the upper body by contracting the abdominal muscles to lift, would enable the muscles to make the Schuler-Cosgrove-long workout. Thus, the back remains straight and stable position.

    The authors of the workout book is not primarily about creating a great six-pack, but rather by a trained to stabilize the spine and abdominal muscles to prevent possible back problems such as injuries. One should therefore always strive to keep his back with every move to (whether in everyday life or in the gym) in a stable position. "Who developed these physical abilities once full, minimize injury and thus increase the efficiency of each workout," said Schuler.

  • gallus81

    Posts: 350

    Feb 09, 2011 12:05 PM GMT
    Nothing new in this; The Plank, or Hovers, are great drills, and I love doing them at the end of a session as a real killer/burner, but I'm not dropping my sit-ups, crunches, etc, as they'e too much fun.
  • Ironman4U

    Posts: 738

    Feb 09, 2011 12:57 PM GMT
    Sit ups and crunches are overrated. Too basic for my taste although I do variations of them. Exercises that combine stability (with your core) are much better functional exercises and will give you a better workout.
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    Feb 09, 2011 3:07 PM GMT
    I love planks, also enjoy an exercise where you kneel and put your forearms on the stability ball and roll out until your abs engage, hold it, then return. These have a name, no idea what it is.
  • tallchris

    Posts: 121

    Feb 09, 2011 6:22 PM GMT
    There are 2 things here. The first is to accept that the washboard "stomach" is about the superficial (external) abs muscles (and low body fat). The main function of them is to shorten the distance between your lower breastbone and your pelvic girdle. So crunches and leg raises work for this purpose, especially when done concentrating on that movement.

    But you need far more than that to build your midsection properly. There are other external muscles - the obliques (side abdomen) which arr used in turning sideways. Then most importantly there are the core muscles, deeper in your abdomen. They support your back and abdomen, though building them won't be very visible. It is essential to build them for overall strength and fitness. The plank and similar exercises work well for this. There is a pleasingly large range of others. They are usually called core stability exercises and you'll find a lot of suggestions on this site. Doing a range of exercises is best.

    There is some effect on the core from doing exercises for the external muscles, and vice versa. Either will work a bit for the other. So you don't have to be religious about it.

    The second thing is that situps do not focus on either. They use your iliopsoas muscles more, which are in the upper front thigh. Ditch them.
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    Feb 10, 2011 12:04 AM GMT
    Ok, now try doing the side planks and then lift the upper leg.
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    Feb 10, 2011 12:21 AM GMT
    The Marine Corps, as well as other US military branches, eliminated sit-ups from their PT tests many years ago. Reason: It's bad for your back. So yeah, this is kinda old news. And this is also the reason why there have been so many ab exercise products over the years. icon_lol.gif

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    Feb 10, 2011 1:06 AM GMT
    xrichx saidThe Marine Corps, as well as other US military branches, eliminated sit-ups from their PT tests many years ago. Reason: It's bad for your back.


    i am not aware of this. every pt standard ive seen includes situps or as they are listed 'abdominal crunches'.
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    Feb 10, 2011 4:28 AM GMT
    blackstrap said
    xrichx saidThe Marine Corps, as well as other US military branches, eliminated sit-ups from their PT tests many years ago. Reason: It's bad for your back.

    i am not aware of this. every pt standard ive seen includes situps or as they are listed 'abdominal crunches'.

    Yeah, maybe I should have clarified. They eliminated the traditional sit-ups and replaced it with crunches or "modified sit-ups". Basically, you're in a regular sit-up position. But you lay your hands/arms across your chest. Then you lift your upper body to perform a crunch, until your elbows touch your thighs. Sucks for guys with short arms because we're still pretty much doing a sit-up, but half-way. Plus, it's timed. So you're trying to max out the reps, and still placing some stress on your lower back.
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    Feb 10, 2011 4:47 AM GMT
    Ironically, I ended up starting a long-standing back problem this way. I put my back in high school out as a result of the move away from the sit-up (which never bothered me) to the static leg raise (which I still can't do without back injury to this day.) Go fig.

    Oh, and thanks to the above posters for the breakdown--that was pretty informative!
  • tallchris

    Posts: 121

    Feb 10, 2011 7:11 PM GMT
    The stress on the back when doing sit-ups is removed by doing them with knees raised, feet on floor. It is doing them with legs straight that stresses the back. But they are still not very good for getting a washboard. Crunches are much better. The dfference is quite subtle - see my previous post for the function of the external abs.
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    Feb 11, 2011 12:50 AM GMT
    The traditional sit-ups are not effective for the abs. The explanation for this alternative gives the reason.

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