MUBARAK RESIGNS AS LEADER OF EGYPT

  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16311

    Feb 11, 2011 4:33 PM GMT
    Will be interesting to see what changes do in fact take place ahead!



    From CNN:

    Cairo, Egypt (CNN) -- Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak resigned Friday, relinquishing power after three decades of iron-clad rule in the powerhouse nation of the Arab world.

    Vice President Omar Suleiman announced the resignation on state television and said he was transferring authority to the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces to "run the affairs of the country."

    Tens of thousands of emotional anti-government protesters erupted in deafening cheers on the streets of Cairo after the announcement.

    "Egypt is free!" they chanted.

    It was a moment anti-government protesters had been waiting for after 18 days of rentless demonstrations that called for Mubarak's departure.

    U.S. President Barack Obama said he was notified of Mubarak's decision Friday morning and was closley watching the extraordinary developments unfold in Egypt, a key U.S. ally. He will make a statement Friday afternoon, the White House said.

    A source with close connections to Persian Gulf government leaders told CNN that Mubarak had gone to the Red Sea resort town of Sharm el-Sheikh.

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    Feb 11, 2011 5:29 PM GMT
    Congratulations to the Egyptian people!

    Great see the celebrations going on over there.

    A few nervous leaders in other countries around the region.
  • rioriz

    Posts: 1056

    Feb 11, 2011 5:47 PM GMT
    While I am happy for the Egyptian people I am still timid about what kind of Government may take over. If it should be ran by a more pro Muslim leadership I hope they model themself after the Turkish style democracy! Let's see how the Administration handles this situation from here on
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    Feb 11, 2011 5:49 PM GMT
    TGIFreedom!
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    Feb 11, 2011 5:56 PM GMT
    rioriz saidWhile I am happy for the Egyptian people I am still timid about what kind of Government may take over. If it should be ran by a more pro Muslim leadership I hope they model themself after the Turkish style democracy! Let's see how the Administration handles this situation from here on


    You have a point, soooo, why not come over and wrestle me to take your mind off of it........until the new government is formed. icon_wink.gif
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    Feb 11, 2011 5:59 PM GMT
    Its a beautiful event to watch !!! A peaceful protest brought down a despotic ruler !!!! I hope this spreads to other country's and even more I hope the US doesn't FUCK IT UP in some way for IMPERIAL INTERESTS nor for the INTERESTS OF ISRAEL, where their only concern is their own interests, and they feared the fall of Mubarak because of those selfish interests at the expense of the Egyptian masses. (this is the truth, not anti jew, truth needs to be told does it not)

    Mubarak enriched himself in part from the US aide second only in amount to what it sends to ISRAEL, Swiss Banks have frozen Mubarak's accounts.


    Suleiman was appointed Vice President, and he was largely responsible for cruelty to those apposed to Mubarak, and instrumental in Bush/Cheney rendition of combatants whom they wanted questioned and who also were tortured under Suleiman. GREAT PARTNER WASN'T HE !!!!
    I only hope this truely does mean Democracy for the Egyptions, and not just more of the same under a different banner. The protesters have been promised democratic reforms and an end to emergency status, we'll soon see !!!


    Its most important though that the people of Egypts interests are put first, not Israels nor US interests, through additional and typical interferences.
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    Feb 11, 2011 6:06 PM GMT
    Its now being reported that after yesterdays Mubarak speech where he refused to step down that several Military Generals came to him and demanded he step down or they would take off their uniforms and join the protesters. So its apparent that is ended up being a joint Protester/Military coup.
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    Feb 11, 2011 6:07 PM GMT
    This is a historic moment. Personally, I'm cautiously optimistic - so long as information through cell phones and the internet are allowed to proliferate. A few inspiring words of an Arab poet Abul-Qasim al-Shabi (1909-1934):

    If, one day, a people desires to live, then fate will answer their call.
    And their night will then begin to fade, and their chains break and fall.
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    Feb 11, 2011 6:46 PM GMT
    realifedad said Its now being reported that after yesterdays Mubarak speech where he refused to step down that several Military Generals came to him and demanded he step down or they would take off their uniforms and join the protesters. So its apparent that is ended up being a joint Protester/Military coup.


    I had a feeling this may be the case.
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    Feb 11, 2011 7:11 PM GMT
    Think I just heard that Switzerland has frozen Mubarak's bank accounts.
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    Feb 11, 2011 11:07 PM GMT
    It's about darn time!

    Now, let's have the Egyptian people determine their own future and have a leader look out for their needs rather than pandering to someone.

    Praying that things go well and don't degrade into chaos.
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    Feb 12, 2011 12:34 AM GMT
    Columbusite saidIt's about darn time!

    Now, let's have the Egyptian people determine their own future and have a leader look out for their needs rather than pandering to someone.

    Praying that things go well and don't degrade into chaos.






    Glad to see more of us wanting to see no interference in the Egyptian peoples democracy that is now forming.





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    On a side note !!! Those Egyptian young people that I've been seeing interviewed are HELLA GOOD LOOKING and VERY INTELIGENT !!!! I'm so glad to see this great event coming to improve so many young peoples lives.
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    Feb 12, 2011 3:29 AM GMT
    This should be a lesson to the government of the United States. In my opinion, the Republicans AND the Democrats should pay VERY close attention to what happened in Egypt in just 18 days!!
    Our country is long overdue for a major overhaul.... and most people I know are sick and tired of the promises of the powers that be.
    Perhaps this is the road WE should take and stop the BS in Washington.
    I'm am NOT particularly interested in hearing about who is at fault. To ME, they are ALL guilty of mishandling our hard earned wages and running our country into the ground.
    Indeed!! $233 Million Dollars to Mubarak to buy 9 luxury equipped Gulf Stream Jets???
    If the oppressed public in Egypt can topple a government in just 18 days, why have we had to deal with the excuses for misappropriated money by THIS government for decades???
    Open for discussion....blast me if you will, but I will also learn from what YOU have to say!!!
  • TheIStrat

    Posts: 777

    Feb 12, 2011 3:32 AM GMT
    Ah yes, my plan to rule over a fundamentalist socialist Caliphate will soon be realized.

    free-MrBurnsExcellent.gif
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    Feb 12, 2011 3:41 AM GMT
    Throughout the past couple of weeks I've found it fascinating that the USA's so-called enemies also supported Mubarak's ouster (obviously for different reasons than the USA's). Here are the reactions of some foreign leaders:

    “Egypt now has a really precious moment of opportunity to have a government that can bring the country together. As a friend of Egypt and the Egyptian people we stand ready to help in any way we can.” David Cameron, Prime Minister

    “We are witnessing a historic change. I call on those who now bear the responsibility and will bear the responsibility to make the developments in Egypt irreversible.” Angela Merkel, German Chancellor

    “The conquest by the will of the great Egyptian nation over the resistance and persistence of officials who were dependent on the world powers is a great victory.” Ramin Mehmanparast, Iran foreign ministry spokesman

    “This is the greatest day of my life ... The country has been liberated after decades of repression ... We have got our life back.” Mohamed ElBaradei, leading Egyptian opposition figure

    “I salute the Egyptian people and the martyrs. This is the day of victory for the Egyptian people. The main goal of the revolution has been achieved.” Mohamed el-Katatni, Muslim Brotherhood

    “It’s too early to foresee how (the resignation) will affect things. We hope that the change to democracy in Egypt will happen without violence and that the peace accord will remain.” Israeli official

    “The resignation of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak is the beginning of the victory of the Egyptian revolution. Such a victory was the result of the sacrifices and the steadfastness of the Egyptian people.” Sami Abu Zuhri, Hamas spokesman

    “Congratulations to Egypt, the criminal has left the palace.” Wael Ghonim, Google executive and protester (via Twitter)

    “The Egyptian people demonstrated what they wanted at the end of a persistent action.” Ahmet Davutoglu, Turkish foreign minister.
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    Feb 12, 2011 4:09 AM GMT
    dsmith123 said“It’s too early to foresee how (the resignation) will affect things. We hope that the change to democracy in Egypt will happen without violence and that the peace accord will remain.” Israeli official


    This +5.
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    Feb 12, 2011 11:03 PM GMT
    sxydrkhair saidCongratulations to the Egyptian people! YOUR COUNTRY IS FREE!


    I wouldn't go that far yet. Mubarak handed control over to the military which is supposedly supposed to oversee things. But I trust the military about as much I trust Mubarak. Can you imagine what will happen if the Suleiman (who the US has been pushing for and is a known torturer.) takes over?
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    Feb 12, 2011 11:05 PM GMT
    I so want me an egyptian man. I have been watching tv and they are totally HOTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTttt.
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    Feb 12, 2011 11:06 PM GMT
    I hope they will have a model democracy.....

    BUT

    in places like egypt the only thing that can change is the name of the dictator.
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    Feb 12, 2011 11:38 PM GMT
    alphatrigger said
    dsmith123 said“It’s too early to foresee how (the resignation) will affect things. We hope that the change to democracy in Egypt will happen without violence and that the peace accord will remain.” Israeli official


    This +5.


    I'll say +10.

    Leave it to someone to bring in a rant against Israel...or the Palestinians. For once, will you guys get off your soapbox...it's a complex issue.

    Obama is right. We have to hope for the best. It's the will of the Egyptian people and one would hope they'd see the rationale for a peaceful Middle East no matter what the final form of the government takes.

    I agree with another post above. I think the military told Mubarak to get out. I have a feeling that it was more than just taking off their uniforms and joining the protestors. I have a feeling it had to do more with the risk of being "assassinated" right there and then.
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    Feb 12, 2011 11:51 PM GMT
    I think 'resigns' is putting it rather generously. The reality is, they virtually had to prise his ass out of the Presidential Palace.
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    Feb 12, 2011 11:51 PM GMT
    sxydrkhair saidCongratulations to the Egyptian people! YOUR COUNTRY IS FREE!


    I don't watch the news that much, but I have been following this protest a little bit. Since Mubarak handed over his power to the armed forces, everyone has thought that this is a victory. But doesn't Mubarak control the armed forces? I may be completely wrong here, because I don't know the government in Egypt that well, but that would be a big blow...
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    Feb 12, 2011 11:56 PM GMT
    Allathlete said
    sxydrkhair saidCongratulations to the Egyptian people! YOUR COUNTRY IS FREE!


    I don't watch the news that much, but I have been following this protest a little bit. Since Mubarak handed over his power to the armed forces, everyone has thought that this is a victory. But doesn't Mubarak control the armed forces? I may be completely wrong here, because I don't know the government in Egypt that well, but that would be a big blow...


    The Egyptian army is separate from anything else. We know that in the U.S., the President is the commander in chief of the armed forces, but that isn't the case in Egypt. They are independent.

    Don't worry, I didn't know either until I was watching the news the other day.
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    Feb 13, 2011 12:26 AM GMT
    Best possible scenario (which is also probably the least likely scenario): Egypt emerges with a populist democracy, modeled in legitimacy of the likes of the populist democracies that spread across Latin America in the past decade (though not necessarily modeled in ideology). This would be truly representative, with a focus on helping the poor and disadvantaged. It is the least likely scenario because America and Israel (along with the other Arab dictatorships in the region) will do everything they can to prevent this from taking place. Historically and presently, America despises populist democracies, and if they cannot manipulate election processes or install U.S.-subservient "democracies" then they will resort to destabilization, coups or war. (A good recent example is Haiti, where the people have been collectively punished by America, Canada, France and the West for electing a popular democratic leader, Jean Bertrane Aristide, which was simply unacceptable to Western interests, so he was subjected to two separate coups and destabilization campaigns).

    A more likely scenario is that Egypt is left with a transition into a neoliberal democratic state, in which all the candidates and parties are pre-approved by the U.S., heavily funded by Western NGOs and "democracy promotion" organizations (like the NED, NDI, IRI, USAID, etc). This was done throughout Africa and Latin America in the 1980s and 1990s, as the backlash against dictatorships spread through those regions. The dictatorships of the neoliberal era were Western puppets who were responsible for imposing the brutal "structural adjustment" policies demanded by the IMF and World Bank which amounted to 'social genocide' and extravagant foreign debts, enslaving the people to foreign creditors while enriching a national tiny elite who were subservient to Western interests. Thus, the neoliberal policies were viewed as illegitimate, since they were demanded by foreign powers and imposed by domestic tyrants. Hence, in the late 1980s and early 90s, a new strategy aimed at "democratization" was shaped, in which Western (particularly American) NGOs and "democracy promotion" organizations would fill the gap left by the social destruction of the neoliberal era, and would support neoliberal democracies, with a focus on elections, multi-party systems, "independent" media, and building a civil society, all of which were funded by Western organizations and governments, to ensure that the resulting civil society, parties and politicians were subservient to Western interests. Thus, more legitimacy was granted to the neoliberal program, as it was "democracies" which were now imposing "structural adjustment", and the people had "choice" in elections, where they could 'choose' between two or more rival factions of elites (all of which were subservient to the same foreign interests). This is the American model of democracy, such as having the Democrats and Republicans be presented as "different", allowing the people "choice" in who fucks them over for the same dominant economic interests.

    The "Islamic threat" is largely concocted to scare white people, westerners and others to ensure that if an Islamic populist movement emerges, it could be crushed and destroyed, and everyone would view it as a "triumph" for freedom and democracy.

    There are also a number of other plausible scenarios, such as a military occupation or war, but let's hope that never comes to pass.

    America is attempting to mitigate "transition" or "unity governments" so that it can manage the process of change. This was done in Tunisia, and now it is being done in Egypt, and in both cases, American contact and influence over the respective militaries has been pivotal to this process.

    If one thing is true of all revolutions, it's that the real struggle begins once the regime has fallen. However, Egypt's regime hasn't even fallen. Mubarak is gone (thank god), but that's just the first step. If the revolution does not confront and challenge American and international dominance over their nation (and military), then it will become a still-born revolution.

    I hope Egyptians find a voice in a populist democracy, but Egypt is so strategically important to American, Israeli, and Western interests that it seems unlikely, and I think war or domestic military oppression would be more likely.

    But perhaps there will be a Western-imposed democracy, in which case there could potentially be another backlash years down the line, as its legitimacy is destroyed, just as occurred in Latin America against the Western-imposed "democracies" that emerged in the 80s and 90s, which experienced their backlash with the populist democratic wave spreading across Venezuela, Bolivia, Argentina, etc. But again we see that America does not like populist and representative democracies, with the attempted coup in Venezuela in 2002, and the more recent successful coup in Honduras in 2009, where a subsequent U.S.-supported dictatorship has suppressed and crushed and even killed many opposition leaders, unions and other democracy advocates.

    Empire is a very dangerous game, and unless the protests and revolutions spread and become more anti-imperial as opposed to simply anti-dictatorial, I fear they will be ultimately "managed" through the change. Just like Hilary Clinton said, the US wants an "orderly transition", which in diplomatic speak, means "managed transition", not true inspiring revolution.

    I am happy that the Egyptians managed to get rid of Mubarak, and they have the blood and scars to prove it, but now the real struggle begins.
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    Feb 13, 2011 1:26 AM GMT
    ^^^Gooooooodness. Maybe you should write an article about it icon_wink.gif