Personal Trainer Help!

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 21, 2011 10:22 PM GMT
    Currently shopping around for a personal trainer, my gym offers personal trainers of course but I feel its way over price and I could get more out of my money through a third party or something. Just wanted to see if anyone had any thoughts on this.

    I did find a website called personaltrainernetwork.com though I am not exactly how it works.

    Any suggestions or help would be cool, thanks icon_smile.gif
  • Profire

    Posts: 224

    Feb 22, 2011 12:11 AM GMT
    Talk to your friends, boss, coworkers, people at the bar, etc.
    I met my trainer while we were at a birthday party for a friend of a friend.

    I told her I was looking for a personal trainer and she gave me her number and I have now been with her for a year and have made huge gains.

    Ask around...there are a lot of people using trainers.
  • KinesiologyMa...

    Posts: 123

    Feb 22, 2011 12:45 AM GMT
    Stephen415 saidCurrently shopping around for a personal trainer, my gym offers personal trainers of course but I feel its way over price and I could get more out of my money through a third party or something. Just wanted to see if anyone had any thoughts on this.

    I did find a website called personaltrainernetwork.com though I am not exactly how it works.

    Any suggestions or help would be cool, thanks icon_smile.gif


    When getting a trainer both can be good private and in a gym like 24. Just remember to see their credentials like being nationally certified. If you truly want a person who knows what they are talking about get one with a degree in kinesiology. And meet them and try them out. Ask for a free session to see if they are worth your time before you invest in like 5 months of training
  • alphatop

    Posts: 1955

    Feb 22, 2011 12:54 AM GMT
    http://menworkoutguide.com/

    and/or

    http://mensworkoutguide.com/
  • MuscleComeBac...

    Posts: 2376

    Feb 22, 2011 1:03 AM GMT
    First: Meet his other clients. Are they getting results, or are they staying the same more or less? Good trainers fire bad clients. Bad trainers just keep them around and get as lazy themselves.
    Two: Someone who has been training clients full time for at least three to five years.
    Three: Someone who works or has worked with clients who have similar goals and body type as you.
    Four: Someone who knows about nutrition as well as exercise physiology and anatomy.
    Five: Watch them train other people. If they're chatty and social - skip it. If they're distant and detached - move on.
    Six: A trainer who is mobile and can move with you if you leave that gym. Desk monkey 'in house' trainers tend to be (though not always) lazy, under-educated in their field, and not sufficiently experienced.
    Seven: It can be very good to find a trainer who looks like you want to look. Not always required, but they should look at least as good or better than their clients.

    Personal Trainers have to have a contract with their clients that includes commitment to push them to new levels and help them achieve real goals. It's not professional company for an hour while you're at the gym, or baby-sitting. It's coaching, investing, and knowing that you're as much a business card for their work as anything else, and taking pride in what you accomplish.

    A truly good trainer is worth the price.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 22, 2011 5:21 PM GMT
    Thanks for all the post all, really helpful suggestions.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 22, 2011 5:57 PM GMT
    I am a personal trainer myself but unfortunately in Green Bay and not Chicago. I just got my personal training certification through ACE so I would suggest going to the ACE website (acefitness.com) and pulling up a listing of ACE'S certified trainers in Chicago. There are lots!! The web site will give you a bio and pic of its trainers in Chicago and start from there. Then do as the earlier posts suggest interviewing and getting list of previous clients etc. Good luck!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 22, 2011 6:31 PM GMT
    Also, double-check that your gym will allow an outside trainer to accompany you. The few gyms I have asked about in Pittsburgh all require the use of their trainers for 'insurance purposes'. Very frustrating. icon_evil.gif
  • tuffguyndc

    Posts: 4437

    Feb 22, 2011 6:57 PM GMT
    Stephen415 saidCurrently shopping around for a personal trainer, my gym offers personal trainers of course but I feel its way over price and I could get more out of my money through a third party or something. Just wanted to see if anyone had any thoughts on this.

    I did find a website called personaltrainernetwork.com though I am not exactly how it works.

    Any suggestions or help would be cool, thanks icon_smile.gif
    i am a trainer and i would be willing to help you. however, if you want, talk to some of the trainers at the gym. many of them will train you outside the gym. also do your homework. ask questions when you meet a trainer. ask them what style of trainer do they have. if you ever hear a trainer who says i only do one thing and not a variety of things when training then that is not a good trainer. ask them about some of the latest training fads. if they can't really tell you about them then run. ha ha ha good luck with your search buddy
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 22, 2011 8:54 PM GMT
    mmkay remember this.

    You pay not for the trainers time you are paying for his experience, his knowledge and his skill.

    You want cheap you get a new trainer, newly certified and lacking experience BUT he or she will get to learn, gain experience and hopefully give you everything they can.

    If you want a great trainer with a ton of experience then you open that wallet you turn it over and you empty it out on the table. In return you will learn a freaking TON of things along the way!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 22, 2011 9:07 PM GMT
    lilTanker said
    If you want a great trainer with a ton of experience then you open that wallet you turn it over and you empty it out on the table. In return you will learn a freaking TON of things along the way!


    "Experienced" trainers aren't always great trainers... I've seen newbies that look like much better than trainers than the ones that have had 30+ years of training experience. It all depends on the individual, which is why you should ask him questions about his training method- etc.

    Also- don't judge a trainer by his appearance.... I had one that was a light-weight bodybuilder with 30+ years of training experience that was a terrible trainer! I felt nothing. Learned nothing. Gained nothing. I did feel a little lighter after out sessions concluded- unfortunately it was due to my empty wallet.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 22, 2011 9:24 PM GMT
    original714 saidAlso, double-check that your gym will allow an outside trainer to accompany you. The few gyms I have asked about in Pittsburgh all require the use of their trainers for 'insurance purposes'. Very frustrating. icon_evil.gif


    That is because house trainers, like wait staff or beauty staff, depend on commissions. They should not have to compete with outside trainers who can charge an hourly rate that does not include all the overhead (equipment, insurance, etc.) a gym has to buy.

    Some other reputable certifications to look for:

    NASM (National Academy of Sports Medicine)
    NCSA (National Conditioning and Strength Association)
    offers the CSCS (Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist) certification
  • MisterT

    Posts: 1272

    Feb 22, 2011 9:27 PM GMT
    While credentials are nice, results are what matters. I know a couple trainers who are private trainers that are not certified, but have more proven results than some trainers i know who have multiple certs and/or degrees. Just because someone knows the information, doesn't mean they can translate that into physical results.

    I'm not certified (yet), but my clients i've trained have make awesome progress. I like explain why I'm having somebody do certain things, and what it is doing for them, rather than the "just do it because I said it will help" that some trainers use. I feel if someone understands how each exercise works and why, then they are more likely to do it, knowledge is good. I also stress good form, and I participate physically, almost like a training partner, rather than just a trainer.

    Watch how the trainer interacts with their clients, do they seem like they are passionate about training, or just there for the pay. You want someone who is truly invested in it, and wants to help you succeed.
  • MisterT

    Posts: 1272

    Feb 22, 2011 9:36 PM GMT
    njmeanwhile said
    original714 saidAlso, double-check that your gym will allow an outside trainer to accompany you. The few gyms I have asked about in Pittsburgh all require the use of their trainers for 'insurance purposes'. Very frustrating. icon_evil.gif


    That is because house trainers, like wait staff or beauty staff, depend on commissions. They should not have to compete with outside trainers who can charge an hourly rate that does not include all the overhead (equipment, insurance, etc.) a gym has to buy.

    Some other reputable certifications to look for:

    NASM (National Academy of Sports Medicine)
    NCSA (National Conditioning and Strength Association)
    offers the CSCS (Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist) certification


    there are ways around using in house trainers, even at gym that don't allow outside trainers. If you bring in your own trainer, just make sure they workout also, like doing each exercise in full sets first, it looks like they are just a training partner.

    Some gyms allow independent trainers. i know a few that have independent trainers as contracts, they just pay a monthly fee to the gym to use the equipment to train their own clients. Some just make the trainer and their clients purchase a gym membership, and some others that have the client as a member just charge the trainer a visitor fee each time.

    If you want an outside trainer, find out what their policy for independent trainers is
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 23, 2011 12:42 AM GMT
    MisterT saidI know a couple trainers who are private trainers that are not certified, but have more proven results than some trainers i know who have multiple certs and/or degrees.


    What he said.
  • nubScotty

    Posts: 282

    Feb 23, 2011 4:10 AM GMT
    Found mine through a womans boot-camp my mom went to, checked out the website cause he told her he did personal training and tossed him an email, turned out he works at a local UC here and does sports medicine. Works out of his house, so he does it for extra cash only paying about $17 a session right now for 1-1.5 hrs icon_biggrin.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 23, 2011 7:43 AM GMT
    A1BOT said
    lilTanker said
    If you want a great trainer with a ton of experience then you open that wallet you turn it over and you empty it out on the table. In return you will learn a freaking TON of things along the way!


    "Experienced" trainers aren't always great trainers... I've seen newbies that look like much better than trainers than the ones that have had 30+ years of training experience. It all depends on the individual, which is why you should ask him questions about his training method- etc.

    Also- don't judge a trainer by his appearance.... I had one that was a light-weight bodybuilder with 30+ years of training experience that was a terrible trainer! I felt nothing. Learned nothing. Gained nothing. I did feel a little lighter after out sessions concluded- unfortunately it was due to my empty wallet.

    You can pick the trainers with experience but have done poorly.

    My experience my intention was to convey "good experience" you will find most of these trainers are booked out.