solutions for stowing dirty laundry after gym?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 27, 2011 1:19 PM GMT
    Hi everyone,

    Just curious what your solution for damp or dirty clothes and towels after gym, if you can't go home right away and the said items have to stew in your gym bag for hours... I've resorted to taking everything out as soon as I get to my car and let everything air dry, or stuffing them in plastic shopping bags and hope for the best... Surely there are more elegant and efficient ways of dealing with this issue? I want to start swimming also; and would like to keep the wet and dry stuff separated if at all possible...

    Any tips and suggestions will be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 27, 2011 1:41 PM GMT
    Sell them on ebay and buy new clothes.
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    Feb 27, 2011 6:16 PM GMT
    I used to run the shoulder strap of my gym bag through the wet speedo and let it hang on the outside.

    I've also seen gym bags with different mesh compartments and watertight compartments to give you multiple options. I've got one that's supposed to be a "cycling" or "tri" bag from REI. It's got the above, plus helmet and shoes compartments. Haven't really used it regularly for gym, so don't know how it holds up. (Mostly use it as an overnight bag.)

    (Currently having the problem of keeping dirty laundry ventilated but secure from mischievous puppies. Don't want it in my closet because it makes it stink in there. I've got a piece of plywood over the hamper with a rock on it.)
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 27, 2011 8:46 PM GMT
    i put the stuff in a plastic bag - shoes go in a diff. bag .
    once i get home, i dump it in the laundry basket but if it's really wet i tend to wash it right away.
    i do all my cardio at home ( running , biking etc. ) so my gym gear is never "soaked" , just sort of humid.
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    Feb 27, 2011 10:20 PM GMT
    If you start swimming, perhaps your facility will have a spin-dryer in the locker room. Many better places do, a small wall-mounted unit you drop your wet suit into, and it spins it to damp dry.

    But I'm not sure merely damp is a problem for just half a day. As noted above, many gym bags, including my own, have separated mesh compartments for this purpose. Just make sure to air-out the bag with the top open after you get home, and the clothes put into a well-ventilated hamper. You may want to periodically spray the bag insides with Fabreze or some other freshner.

    You might also want to keep several hampers if you have the space, as I used to do, in which I separated the clothes the way I would wash them -- whites, colors, delicates, etc. Because putting very damp clothes in a hamper with non-colorfast dry ones might cause some color transfer and spotting.
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    Feb 27, 2011 10:24 PM GMT
    ^^ I've never seen a spin-dryer at a pool before. Often in the locker rooms there's a machine that just washes the chlorine out.

    I suggest just using a plastic grocery bag or something. I always stick my swimsuit in one of those and then put it in my gym bag. Then when I get home I take it out and hang-dry it in my bathroom.

    Make sure you wash out the chlorine before letting it sit in your gym bag or car though.

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    Feb 27, 2011 10:30 PM GMT
    t_h_r_i_v_e said^^ I've never seen a spin-dryer at a pool before. Often in the locker rooms there's a machine that just washes the chlorine out.

    The drill is to take your suit into the shower with you and rinse it with water. You could use a sink, but ordinarily you should be flushing the chlorine off your skin after the pool anyway, so you kill 2 birds with 1 stone.

    Then you put the rinsed suit into the spinner to get it damp dry. I saw a locker room with a suit rinser, but I don't believe it spun it dry. I can rinse a suit under a showerhead myself -- what a spinner can do better than me is to get it damp dry. In any case, this is all dependent upon what the OP has available, and merely some ideas of what he should look for and use.
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    Feb 27, 2011 11:09 PM GMT
    paulflexes saidSell them on ebay and buy new clothes.





    How Much ? icon_smile.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 27, 2011 11:13 PM GMT
    Seriously, change your gym clothes for one of the moisture wicking polyesters.... it will keep you dry and these dry fast and nothing is absorbed like cotton.


    Believe me, these are nothing like the polyester shirts they used to sell and advertise as "no iron" and made you sweat.

    They are a little more expensive but worth it...


  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 27, 2011 11:14 PM GMT
    I have a gym bag that has a compartment for clean and dirty/wet clothes. Works great until I get home late, forget to take them out, and show up at the gym the next day with only sweaty clothes.
  • neosyllogy

    Posts: 1714

    Feb 27, 2011 11:25 PM GMT
    Vinegar.
    Throw some white vinegar in the wash (a cup?, I don't know, I just do it by 'glugs', you can look it up).
    The increased acidity kills bacteria and removes the gym odor from your clothes.
    As such, you don't have to worry about the clothes stewing (I'm assuming you're using clean clothes every time you go the gym).
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    Feb 28, 2011 12:22 AM GMT
    mtlswim said
    paulflexes saidSell them on ebay and buy new clothes.





    How Much ? icon_smile.gif
    twinny dolla icon_biggrin.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 28, 2011 12:31 AM GMT
    I put my sweaty gym clothes, socks, etc., in separate Ziploc bags so they don't contaminate other stuff in my gym bag. As soon as I get home, I either (i) wash them (by hand or in the machine) or (ii) airdry them. Works for me.
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    Feb 28, 2011 2:26 AM GMT
    neosyllogy saidVinegar.
    Throw some white vinegar in the wash (a cup?, I don't know, I just do it by 'glugs', you can look it up).
    The increased acidity kills bacteria and removes the gym odor from your clothes.
    As such, you don't have to worry about the clothes stewing (I'm assuming you're using clean clothes every time you go the gym).


    and how big is the pickle ?
  • LJay

    Posts: 11612

    Feb 28, 2011 2:35 AM GMT
    I don't have a dryer so wet stuff like that gets put on a hanger or over the edge of the tub or wherever until dry and then can be put in the dirty clothes.

    As for getting it home, put it in a plastic bag of some sort. A stinky gym bag can be as bad as stinky gym clothes.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 28, 2011 9:51 AM GMT
    Thanks for everyone's input so far!

    LJay said A stinky gym bag can be as bad as stinky gym clothes.


    This is exactly what I am trying to avoid.