Quit Meth & Nervous About Working out

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 01, 2011 4:19 AM GMT

    I am 42 and have used meth everyday for over a year. Recently I have quit and with the help of anti-depressants I feel hopeful I can stay off of it.

    My problem is that I haven't gone to the gym in a year and feel really weak, out of shape and not confidant. I'm not skinny nor fat, although I should lose weight instead of gain if it were a choice of the two. (Although in all honesty, when I saw James Franco in white tights, it did look a lot like my body, although not sure that's a good thing for Franco....)

    I am afraid to see the judgmental evaluations of guys in the gym, I live in an extremely superficial gay neighborhood where getting old is considered a criminal offense and being out of shape is also a felony (JK).

    I'm serious. It hurts and I know what people are thinking by the bitch face expressions of disapproval and it is what has kept me away from the gym.

    Any suggestions? Any ideas for a routine to get back into the swing of thingsicon_question.gif
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    Mar 01, 2011 7:31 AM GMT
    OK, no one? hmm...maybe I posted in the wrong section...or maybe no one cares...
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    Mar 01, 2011 10:57 AM GMT
    Or both....


    sad-o.gif
  • tatootim

    Posts: 15

    Mar 01, 2011 11:45 AM GMT
    You might try exercising out of the gym for a bit. Maybe try working out at home and strengthening your core. Meth can really alter how we interpret signals from the world around us. It can distort reality and how we perceive the way others view us. This will go away with time. Congratulations on quitting the Meth. I wish you the best of luck.
  • slimnmuscly

    Posts: 541

    Mar 01, 2011 12:10 PM GMT
    tatootim saidYou might try exercising out of the gym for a bit. Maybe try working out at home and strengthening your core. Meth can really alter how we interpret signals from the world around us. It can distort reality and how we perceive the way others view us. This will go away with time. Congratulations on quitting the Meth. I wish you the best of luck.


    I agree with all this, except I would encourage the OP to just suck it up and go to the gym anyway. Do circuit training on the machines for six weeks to get back into the swing of things, then start incorporating free weights, making your routine more difficult, etc.

    Honestly, what you're experiencing is the same insecurity every out-of-shape person feels when starting to work out, only it's amplified by lingering meth paranoia. Trust me, you don't know what people are thinking; you just think you do. Chances are you're pretty much the last thing on the mind of just about every guy at the gym but yourself. Use that invisibility to your advantage: Get in, do your workout, and get out. And stick with it.

    The good news is that if you used to work out before, it'll be easier for you to get back to where you used to be in terms of size and strength than if you were starting for the first time. Working out will also help your recovery from depression. Don't give up those benefits just to avoid the imagined disapproval of others.
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    Mar 01, 2011 12:26 PM GMT
    Maybe you should relocate, get out of that superficial, hostile neighborhood. Doesn't sound like you like it anyway.
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    Mar 01, 2011 12:27 PM GMT
    Congratulations on getting off of meth. I have no idea what does to/for a person. But I am sure it is a good thing you are off it.

    You're never going to improve if you let the imagined thoughts of superficial people run your life. Don't focus on the present; focus on how good you are going to look in six months. Those bitches will be thinking differently then.

    Hire a personal trainer...even if only for 3 or 4 sessions to teach you how to workout.
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    Mar 01, 2011 12:29 PM GMT
    boulderic saidMaybe you should relocate, get out of that superficial, hostile neighborhood. Doesn't sound like you like it anyway.

    I doubt that will help. Realize all of this is going on in his head.
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    Mar 01, 2011 12:47 PM GMT
    Congrats on getting off the Meth.... Although never had the issues you have with the gym I just loathe dealing with the gym bunnys when I'm trying to work out, so have dealt with finding alternate solutions in the past.

    Try hitting the gym at odd times, late mornings or after lunch.. It's less crowded and annoying. Also although expensive, you do sound like a prime candidate for a private personal trainer. I've been going to one for over a year that trains in a private gym in his home, 3x a week... best thing I ever did.
  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16311

    Mar 01, 2011 1:25 PM GMT
    Glad you are off the meth, congrats for that for sure. I wish your "drug of choice" would be fitness and exercise.

    I know what I'm going to say is pretty simple, but I think it means something.... who gives a shit about what others might think.
    I mean really! There are many (I mean alot) of gentleman who go to the YMCA's in Wichita that are overweight or at least average. Nobody "looks" at them (in that way) at least that I have perceived.

    My suggestion is that you try several gyms (you should anyway). Check out the facilities, the prices and the atmosphere. Select the one you are most comfortable with, considering all involved.

    Again, awesome you are off Meth and I hope exercise will take over.
    Good luck!

    icon_biggrin.gif
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    Mar 01, 2011 1:36 PM GMT
    Have some love for yourself and don't give a damn for what people think. A lot of superficial guys out there who shouldn't matter to you now...

    Put your head up and look forward to the future, the beginning is hard but by the summer you will feel healthy and fit again. I want to see you back here again saying that you succeed and are feeling great!
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    Mar 01, 2011 3:09 PM GMT
    There’s no ‘addiction’ like an endorphin buzz after a really tough free weight workout. Get started by just diving in and doing it and do it until you replace the meth addiction with the endorphin addiction. You’ll be much healthier and have a good time at it. You’re probably well off to get a trainer for a month or so you have some guidance getting started, but once you do, you’ll find it difficult to quit. Even an old codger like me can’t stand not to work out and I mean doing something physical daily.
  • CuriousJockAZ

    Posts: 19136

    Mar 01, 2011 3:24 PM GMT
    Congratulations for getting off the meth. That drug will lead you nowhere good -- but then, you probably already know that by now. Having lived where you live for 20 years before moving back to Arizona, I know all too well the pressures of living in L.A. to stay in shape and look good. No wonder many people there are on drugs -- it's daunting. I remember that there is no better endorphin high than hiking Runyon Canyon. My suggestion is to consider getting yourself back into the exercise routine and in shape by doing exercise activities away from the gym that are not only really great workouts, but also gives you a chance to think and reflect at the same time which, coming off an addiction, you probably need to give yourself the time to do. Another great workout is the stairs in Santa Monica off of San Vicente & 4th St which are the best cardio workout you could ask for. Do other things like rollerblading or jogging on the bike path at the beach or taking a Yoga Class.

    Good luck!!!!
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    Mar 01, 2011 3:48 PM GMT
    First off, congrats for kicking the habit. Hopefully fitness and health will be a part of the total lifestyle change you'll need to enact to really move on from your past.

    I agree with others that the attitude you feel from dudes at the gym is mostly in your head. Personally, unless I'm taking (or teaching) a group fitness class, the gym is not a place where I interact with other people; I use my gym time to be completely selfish. Put your earbuds on and focus on yourself.

    For now, getting fit and healthy is not about other people, it's about YOU. I think that in time, you'll realize that the people in the gym aren't judging you as hard as you once thought. "Gym rats" are usually encouraging and helpful if you give them the chance to be.

    I think yoga might be a good fit for you. There are tons of benefits, both physical and psychological. Obviously, it'd just be a part of your total workout regimen, but I think it can do wonders for people. Another alternative is taking group fitness classes like aerobics of Body Pump (if your gym subscribes to that program). These group classes are all about camaraderie and motivation, no matter your fitness level.

    Good luck and keep the forum posted on your progress!
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    Mar 01, 2011 3:55 PM GMT
    The way you're feeling now is one of many results of your former drug use. Challenge yourself, wrkout and remember this feeling so you never want to return to this state of mind.
    Best of luck to you and your sobriety
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    Mar 01, 2011 4:00 PM GMT
    1. Good for you on quitting meth.
    2. Only worry about what you think, not what others think.
    3. I too would suggest working out at home if you find the gym a social nightmare situation.

    3a. How to facilitate home workouts? A pull up bar that hooks over your door frame - vs one you have to screw into the frame, - a couple of dumbbells of the weight of your choosing, a yoga/workout mat, and watching lots of instructional videos on RealJock.

    4. Run outside. Even in the cold. Builds character.
  • SoDakGuy

    Posts: 1862

    Mar 01, 2011 4:09 PM GMT
    I have a few questions.

    1. Did you go to rehab?

    2. Do you have a sponsor?

    3. Do you go to CMA (Crystal Meth Anonymous) meetings?

    Reason why I'm asking these questions is to know if you have a support system you can reach out to that can help you meet other guys and gals (regardless of sexuality) that have been in your situation and help you get back at the gym.

    The best thing for you to do is to go out and do some research on AND off line. Hell, get a trainer and a nutritionist and tell them exactly what you told us here. They both can help you get your fitness life back on track.
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    Mar 01, 2011 4:18 PM GMT
    1. Absolutely terrific on getting away from meth. You did it for yourself because it will take you life if it doesn't kill you (I hope you understand that).

    2. Working out is part of being and staying healthy. If you know or think others at your gym are frowning on you for that, judging you and making you feel uncomfortable, then perhaps you are at the wrong gym (because that would be wrong for anyone to do to anybody).

    3. Keep taking your anti-d pills and keep your doctor appointments and let him know your thoughts.

    4. Believe in yourself or no one else will either.

    You did something wonderful and big by kicking the meth habit. Cut yourself some slack and go workout and all of this will fade away.

    And can you really afford to worry or consider what people to whom you have no allegiance or love/care about you or know you think of you? I know you have better things to do.

    Get inspired by some of the dudes on this site and go have a good workout, guy.
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    Mar 01, 2011 6:12 PM GMT
    CuriousJockAZ said Another great workout is the stairs in Santa Monica off of San Vicente & 4th St which are the best cardio workout you could ask for.


    I remember that place very well. I'm ready to go back. One full winter in Central Ohio is enough. No wonder I spend three hours a day in the gym.
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    Mar 01, 2011 6:33 PM GMT
    LAREX said
    I am 42 and have used meth everyday for over a year. Recently I have quit and with the help of anti-depressants I feel hopeful I can stay off of it.

    My problem is that I haven't gone to the gym in a year and feel really weak, out of shape and not confidant. I'm not skinny nor fat, although I should lose weight instead of gain if it were a choice of the two. (Although in all honesty, when I saw James Franco in white tights, it did look a lot like my body, although not sure that's a good thing for Franco....)

    I am afraid to see the judgmental evaluations of guys in the gym, I live in an extremely superficial gay neighborhood where getting old is considered a criminal offense and being out of shape is also a felony (JK).

    I'm serious. It hurts and I know what people are thinking by the bitch face expressions of disapproval and it is what has kept me away from the gym.

    Any suggestions? Any ideas for a routine to get back into the swing of thingsicon_question.gif



    Try something like P90X for three months. You can do it at home with a little bit of cheap equipment.

  • JFitNC

    Posts: 50

    Mar 01, 2011 7:03 PM GMT
    If you are worrying about what everyone is thinking at the gym while you are working out it means you are focusing on the wrong thing and aren't there to improve your health. Consider investing in personal training for a short period just to get back into a routine and reoriented in the gym setting. I'm afraid your goals are not exactly conducive to long term results. Gay men have the undeniable habit of focusing too much on the vanity of being in shape instead of the health benefits. Once you concentrate on the latter then you will more like have success in the gym.

    When there try to zone completely into your workout and have a concentrated/intense routine that pushes you. You have to get healthy for you or it won't work and you will end up just having a very unsuccessful time in reaching your goals. Good luck to the OP.
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    Mar 01, 2011 7:27 PM GMT
    First of all: Congratulations on taking the FIRST step to recovery!!

    I hope you are involved in a 12 step program of some kind...CMA and NA are good. But I found more help in AA, being a dually addicted person. I found that in the CMA and NA meetings there was too much talk about how it used to be...where did you score, how much, etc. and not enough focus on what you will become.
    Having been in recovery for over 20 yrs., I can assure you that it will get better.
    The 12 step programs are somewhat designed in 30 day increments. There is a reason for this...and it has a lot to do with physiology. If you have been using for a year, the drug works it's way into the most inner core of you body.
    The first 30 days are usually a little easier than the days that follow...but FOCUS on ONE day at a time. Do NOT think about the next 30, 60 or 90 days. It takes some time for the drug to be totally out of your system, and as it works it's way through your body, you will most likely experience times of real craving...this is because, as the drug comes closer to the surface, it triggers undesired feelings. These are the times you want to be close to others in recovery, as we have all gone through it and can help immensely with YOUR recovery.
    As for the gym...it's not going anywhere. You can do a lot of things without having to feel the scrutiny of others. The gym will always be there...when you feel you are ready!!
    My best to you and YOUR recovery,
    David
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    Mar 01, 2011 8:53 PM GMT
    Forget what other people think. This is about YOU. Not them. Set some goals for yourself and get after them. Once you start getting back into shape, you'll feel so much better physically and mentally. Good luck.
  • inmidair

    Posts: 70

    Mar 01, 2011 9:44 PM GMT
    I've never done meth, but I can imagine that quitting and asking for the help you need takes a lot of personal courage and determination. I hope that you are able to find confidence in the strength that you have already shown, because you've already done a lot worth being proud of.

    When I was younger, people I trained with used to give me looks or even make comments about my level of physical fitness, and it really got to me. As I got older, though, I realized that those people's comments were more about their own issues and insecurities than about me. Besides, anyone who's going to behave like that is not the kind of friend you need right now... or ever.

    Finally, I hope that in reading through the forums a bit you'll find that lots of guys, even guys with delicious-looking bodies, felt (or still feel) insecure about their bodies or in the gym. If you are hoping to make friends and be part of your gym community, there are probably guys out there who are really friendly and not interested in the stinkeye games.

    Congratulations to you, and best of luck. icon_smile.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 02, 2011 12:32 AM GMT
    Celebrate your age dude!!! I just turned 40 and I can't even fully imagine all the great success coming my way.

    I do have to warn you there is a difference between quitting drugs and committing to a healthier lifestyle. I've been around the block on everything from booze to heroine and change is really not an overnight thing. I also caution you to not accept any diagnoses from a Psychiatrist until you have been off of meth for at least one year. It is very dangerous.

    As for acknowledging your physical health, it's a great new step and just think, you still have the other half of your life to live!