Deadlift -vs- Romanian Deadlift

  • bad_wolf

    Posts: 1002

    Mar 03, 2011 11:58 AM GMT
    So I've tried both and they don't seem to do anything for my legs. They work the lower back, which is ok I guess if I was doing a core workout session, but from little I know they're meant to target the glutes and hamstring.

    So which is it and what should I keep an eye out for in my technique.

    Thanks in advance for any help =o)
  • massbuildah

    Posts: 276

    Mar 03, 2011 1:30 PM GMT
    Standard deadlifts are key for overall muscle building. That and the squat are the 2 biggest overall size builders out there. Every mass building program should include them. If you want to really bring up your hamstrings and add significant size, more than you can get from lying leg curls (which don't effectively hit both muscles) then you should be doing stiff-legged deadlifts.
    The difference here is, just as it says, your legs stay straight throughout execution (without locking your knees).

    Make sure your form is down right. No arching or rounding of the back here. keep the focus on the stretch and contraction on the way up.

    You might not want to start with this kind of weight but you'll get the idea:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pSQkOLWZ0fM

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    Mar 03, 2011 1:55 PM GMT
    massbuildah saidIf you want to really bring up your hamstrings and add significant size, more than you can get from lying leg curls (which don't effectively hit both muscles) then you should be doing stiff-legged deadlifts.


    I was just about to post a reply saying the same thing then saw you beat me to it - stiff legged deads FTW. Feet shoulder width apart, knees slightly bent, bend forward at the hips keeping a straight back and bring the bar over your feet, then straighten up again.
  • bad_wolf

    Posts: 1002

    Mar 17, 2011 10:37 AM GMT
    Thanks for the input, will hopefully find out tonight whether I hit the spot or break myself in half.
  • massbuildah

    Posts: 276

    Mar 17, 2011 11:14 AM GMT
    Pure said
    massbuildah saidIf you want to really bring up your hamstrings and add significant size, more than you can get from lying leg curls (which don't effectively hit both muscles) then you should be doing stiff-legged deadlifts.


    I was just about to post a reply saying the same thing then saw you beat me to it - stiff legged deads FTW. Feet shoulder width apart, knees slightly bent, bend forward at the hips keeping a straight back and bring the bar over your feet, then straighten up again.



    perfect desription! Effin love em! lol

    Good luck wolf!
  • bad_wolf

    Posts: 1002

    Mar 21, 2011 1:55 PM GMT
    Just to let you know - ow
  • neosyllogy

    Posts: 1714

    Mar 21, 2011 2:19 PM GMT
    You're using bad form.
    I'd explain how, but given that you expressed you'd be willing to hit women in another thread, I think the world is better with you weaker.
  • bad_wolf

    Posts: 1002

    Mar 21, 2011 2:23 PM GMT
    Ow - as in I hit the spot. And clearly you didn't understand my point regarding the right to defend yourself against an aggressor.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 30, 2011 5:04 PM GMT
    massbuildah saidStandard deadlifts are key for overall muscle building. That and the squat are the 2 biggest overall size builders out there. Every mass building program should include them. If you want to really bring up your hamstrings and add significant size, more than you can get from lying leg curls (which don't effectively hit both muscles) then you should be doing stiff-legged deadlifts.
    The difference here is, just as it says, your legs stay straight throughout execution (without locking your knees).

    Make sure your form is down right. No arching or rounding of the back here. keep the focus on the stretch and contraction on the way up.

    You might not want to start with this kind of weight but you'll get the idea:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pSQkOLWZ0fM



    Not to revive a somewhat dead thread, but should one do deadlifts and squats to build overall size for the upper body as well or is there another exercise for that?
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    Mar 30, 2011 10:35 PM GMT
    Chainers said
    massbuildah saidStandard deadlifts are key for overall muscle building. That and the squat are the 2 biggest overall size builders out there. Every mass building program should include them. If you want to really bring up your hamstrings and add significant size, more than you can get from lying leg curls (which don't effectively hit both muscles) then you should be doing stiff-legged deadlifts.
    The difference here is, just as it says, your legs stay straight throughout execution (without locking your knees).

    Make sure your form is down right. No arching or rounding of the back here. keep the focus on the stretch and contraction on the way up.

    You might not want to start with this kind of weight but you'll get the idea:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pSQkOLWZ0fM



    Not to revive a somewhat dead thread, but should one do deadlifts and squats to build overall size for the upper body as well or is there another exercise for that?




    As someone already stated above, YES. Squats and deadlifts should always be included in any serious weight routine. Hell, I'll go even further......if I were only allowed to pick two exercises to do for the rest of my life, it would be these two. And anyone who says they're not getting anything out of doing them is doing them wrong! Ironically, these are also the two exercises that are done incorrectly more than any other exercise. They are also the most dangerous if done incorrectly, so get proper instruction from someone you trust (ideally a certified trainer.) But for a couple of pointers, the squat should be done to mimic sitting back in a chair. This will feel like you're falling backwards at first if you're not used to doing them. The bar does NOT rest on your shoulders. Let it slide way down your back and hold it there throughout the movement. Make sure your knees stay behind your toes at all times and keep your feet flat on the floor. Shoes are important. Converse Chucks are great for both squating and deadlifting as your feet are less likely to roll. You can also buy expensive squating shoes but I don't think they're necessary. Vibrams Five Fingers are great for this also. With deadlifts, the bar should practically be scraping your shins. Look up with both these exercises.

    I personally prefer Sumo Squats and Sumo Deadlifts. "Sumo" just means you're using a very wide stance. Of course I change it up every 4-6 weeks, but those are my staple movements. Do them deep and with good form and you'll swear you got run over by a truck the next day. (In a good way of course.) Don't listen to people who tell you not to go deep. This is where you will get the most benefit. Hope this helps.
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    Mar 30, 2011 10:47 PM GMT
    Dude scruffypup has hit it dead on, and you can tell.
    My whole goal about gaining weight has finally started to see improvement with deadlifts and squats. No way to emphasize safety in a fucking thread though, cancel your HBO and pay for a trainer a few times to really get the movement down. I think the most common safety mistake with the deadlift is to arch the back anticipating the weight (it was mine). To combat this, I would place my feet shoulder (or just wider) width apart and then I would look down to place my hands, I use inverse grip, one hand facing me the other facing out. Once I know where my hands are to go I stand back up, and look slightly up (never at myself in a mirror or down, this causes you to unknowingly lean forward), and while looking up bend down to where I already felt my hands grasp the bar. You most definitely will feel this in your glutes and hamstrings as well as your lower back. BRING the bar towards your shins as you begin the lift this maximizes the movement on the right muscles and prevents your upper back from stressing it however you will bruise up your shins with that inverse grip... (thats how I know if I'm doin it right).
    Stretching before hand is an absolute. I've always treated deadlifts as a back exercise and not legs, but it does all of it.
    Sumo squats are legit as well. Especially if you are taller, doing regular squats with shoulder width apart can stress the knees more and doesn't isolate the quads like the wide stance. I stick with the wide stance although I can squat more with the regular stance, its not about weight its about 'goin low' and keeping that great form. Same principle applies with squats, look slightly up and not straight ahead and never down, this keeps your ass our, chest out, and back straight.
    Good luck!
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    Mar 31, 2011 5:39 PM GMT
    sportsman saidDude scruffypup has hit it dead on, and you can tell.
    My whole goal about gaining weight has finally started to see improvement with deadlifts and squats. No way to emphasize safety in a fucking thread though, cancel your HBO and pay for a trainer a few times to really get the movement down. I think the most common safety mistake with the deadlift is to arch the back anticipating the weight (it was mine). To combat this, I would place my feet shoulder (or just wider) width apart and then I would look down to place my hands, I use inverse grip, one hand facing me the other facing out. Once I know where my hands are to go I stand back up, and look slightly up (never at myself in a mirror or down, this causes you to unknowingly lean forward), and while looking up bend down to where I already felt my hands grasp the bar. You most definitely will feel this in your glutes and hamstrings as well as your lower back. BRING the bar towards your shins as you begin the lift this maximizes the movement on the right muscles and prevents your upper back from stressing it however you will bruise up your shins with that inverse grip... (thats how I know if I'm doin it right).
    Stretching before hand is an absolute. I've always treated deadlifts as a back exercise and not legs, but it does all of it.
    Sumo squats are legit as well. Especially if you are taller, doing regular squats with shoulder width apart can stress the knees more and doesn't isolate the quads like the wide stance. I stick with the wide stance although I can squat more with the regular stance, its not about weight its about 'goin low' and keeping that great form. Same principle applies with squats, look slightly up and not straight ahead and never down, this keeps your ass our, chest out, and back straight.
    Good luck!


    Truth. The grip- where one hand is overhand and the other under I've found to be easier than going one way or another for some reason. Also, what works for stretching for me (being that I'm 6'7") would be the butterfly stretch where you put the bottoms of your feet together, the one-foot-in-front-of-you-and-reach-it stretch as well as a glute stretch where you cross one leg over the other that's straight and you set the crossing foot as close to your waist as possible. Then I do cardio that works the legs for about 10 minutes. Walk, sprint, jog- it's all good. Less so with walking, but rowing and swimming are both out of the question.

    One thing that I've noticed is that I once tried squatting after deadlifting and I felt more flexible than if I just started with a stretch and squat. Of course I also do sumo squats. When your legs are shoulder width apart at my height and shoe size (14), it's super hard to control your balance anyway.

    One more thing, if any newbs are reading this, deadlifts are also a huge key to explosive strength AND you get a sexy bubble butt in the process. I would call that a win-win, but that's just me. icon_smile.gif
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    Mar 31, 2011 5:45 PM GMT
    http://startingstrength.wikia.com/wiki/Starting_Strength_Wiki


    /thread
  • mikeybat

    Posts: 1

    Feb 24, 2012 9:53 PM GMT
    Try doing hack squats with a narrow stance and heels elevated for quads, and lunges for hams and cheeks. No need for deads of any kind; you get more than enough spinal erector work from squats and lunges.

    Both these exercises will give you a heart-shaped hiney instead of that thick at the top, narrow at the bottom look that powerlifters get. Lunges are great for the hams and cheeks.

    High reps to failure work better than low reps; I alternate between 25-50 and 50-100 every time I plateau, just one set of exercise per bodypart, 3x a week. I lost 90 pounds, but still managed to gain an inch on my arms and 2 on my chest. I never gained so much muscle doing lower reps and more sets.

    Hope that helps.
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    Feb 24, 2012 11:25 PM GMT
    Deadlifts do build alot of muscle............However, its often ugly looking...........Unless you are blessed with amazing genetics for putting it in the right places, alot of gains from deadlifts will go to your traps, and obliques, not areas you want too much size in, unless you want to look narrow and blocky.

    I think the dogma that you must Squat and Deadlift is overplayed..............They can be useful, but So Can Leg Presses and Bent Over Rows..................The Guy who does Bent over rows and Leg Presses, is likely to have a better looking body.............

    Also, doing Squats and Deadlifts in the same week is likely to overtrain the vast majority of trainers, and leave a lack of recovery for the lower back.............

    Sitff Leg Deadlifts, done properly are a good move to target the hamstrings and glutes........particually as a pre exhaust for Leg Presses, for someone who lacks in those areas...........

    Generally, if someone isnt growing, its often they train too much
    45 mins 3 times a week is ideal for most people............