A Virginia middle school student has been suspended for . . . opening the door for a woman whose hands were full.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 05, 2011 12:36 AM GMT
    It seems insane to me that in the name of protecting students against an absurdly low risk, they would hurt them possibly permanently. I wonder if this goes on his/her permanent record.

    http://reason.com/blog/2011/03/04/chivalry-is-dead-was-murdered

    “Students are not allowed to open the doors, and if anyone does, they will be suspended,” said Dr. Wayne K. Smith, executive director of administration and personnel.

    A districtwide policy prohibiting students and staff from opening doors to the outside was recently adopted after a $10,800 security system was installed at the middle school, Southampton High School, Southampton Technical Career Center and Nottoway, Meherrin and Capron elementary schools. Riverdale Elementary had a similar system installed when it was built three years ago.

    All of the schools’ doors are locked during the day. Visitors must ring a buzzer and look into a camera before office personnel can let them in.
    Smith said everyone knew about the policy and its consequences. The middle school student was the first to be suspended for opening a door. Smith did not say how many days of suspension the unidentified student received.

    You can't be too careful. Your average middle school, high school, or college can expect to see an on-campus shooting about once every 12,000 years. If Southhampton Middle School hasn't had at least one shooting since 10,000 B.C., they're really just on borrowed time.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 05, 2011 3:34 AM GMT
    You have got to be kidding me.

    School systems are taking the zero tollerance policy way out of proportion. What ever happened to teaching kids the difference between right and wrong other then know every detail and letter in a policy and procedure manual.

    We are just teaching everyone to be a robot and do nothing for others or show respect and help.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 05, 2011 3:37 AM GMT
    Yet another example of students being made an example of in support of myopic zero tolerance policies. This story belongs among the others listed here and here.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 05, 2011 3:43 AM GMT
    Southhampton County isn't a part of VA I would call... enlightened. It's not far from here but it might as well be a million miles away.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 05, 2011 7:24 AM GMT
    wow, unbelievable. Really, if a person wants to bomb/kill/massacre/steal/etc a school, they'll always find a way. All of this security is really unnecessary and worse, it provokes the unwanted attention.
  • Brando

    Posts: 161

    Mar 05, 2011 8:42 AM GMT
    sxydrkhair saidAh, I always thought my "rich and snob" high school was worse. Can't bring water bottle or coke can to school. You have to buy it from coke/water vending machine, because teachers/staffs think students may use water bottle as explosion. Yeah that may sound ridiculous.


    Yep. Sounds like my old Virginia high school as well.
  • Tiller66

    Posts: 380

    Mar 05, 2011 9:17 AM GMT
    Well this is just one of many ways the terrorists are winning.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 05, 2011 9:24 AM GMT
    This is pretty sad...What H.S becoming to......
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 05, 2011 9:25 AM GMT
    Thanks for answering the question that has been on my mind for the last week. "Why do so few people posses any degree of common sense.?" It would seem that it is being instilled from a young age...
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 05, 2011 10:54 AM GMT
    The Rule of Statism by Fear and Security Theatre starts young.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 05, 2011 3:30 PM GMT


    lol, we had that rule at the phone co I worked for, at the banks I worked for, and at the apartment building I lived in.

    -Doug

    suspension is really heavy-handed, unless she had a history of defeating security systems.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 05, 2011 6:10 PM GMT
    Eh, I worked in a place like that for twelve years. If you're going to have a security system, it doesn't make sense to allow people to bypass it. But someone has to exercise a bit of oversight over the security goons or they will get out of hand.

    For a long time, we were allowed to let someone through a door if we personally verified their security badge. But then things got out of hand when they went to an all-computerized system. Not just the outside doors, but all the office and laboratory doors were tied in. You had to have specific permission to enter anywhere. And any bureaucrat anywhere could lock you out of your own lab on a whim or by mistake, by making a change in the database. They used it to build little empires. (You must pay me $1K to take my shoe-laces safety-training refresher class every quarter, or you will be locked out of your office.) So letting people in manually was forbidden.

    I actually liked it better when we had guys with machine-guns at the gate, and clearly marked kill-zones around the really sensitive stuff. Other than that, they left you alone to do your job.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 05, 2011 9:18 PM GMT
    meninlove said

    lol, we had that rule at the phone co I worked for, at the banks I worked for, and at the apartment building I lived in.

    -Doug

    suspension is really heavy-handed, unless she had a history of defeating security systems.


    I agree that suspension is probably too harsh, but - as others have pointed out - there's no point having a security system is students are going to open the door for people. And perhaps some of you feel that her knowing this woman was a plus, but given that most children are abused by people they know, I think that's a false sense of security. She should have been disciplined but perhaps something short of suspension (is detention done anymore?), would have been sufficient to get the point across and demonstrate the seriousness of the issue.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 06, 2011 6:02 PM GMT
    Well, the security goons where I wurked actually used to test us on stuff like this. Walking around wearing the wrong security badge, and yes, posing as an old lady with her hands full. If you made the wrong move, you got in big trouble. Nothing like instilling a little paranoia in the population.

    One year the "test" was a senior manager walked around before xmas, dressed as Santa Claus, handing out candy canes. (Face with big white beard did not match security badge.) Fortunately, someone turned him in before he got to me.