Is solely doing cardio looked down upon in fitness

  • KnuxNole

    Posts: 219

    Mar 11, 2011 6:47 AM GMT
    I consider myself to be fairly active, I keep healthy and run/swim, but it seems everyone considers fitness to be about the weight room. I mean, if someone asked if I was in shape, I would say yes because of those two facts above. But, when I mention I only run and swim, I feel people don't think that's good based on expression. I'm the guy, who runs/swims, eats 3 meals, and that's basically it. I don't see that a problem at all, but maybe I'm wrong, idk.
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    Mar 11, 2011 7:32 AM GMT
    I honestly think that there is absolutely nothing wrong about this. Who cares what people think. icon_wink.gif
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    Mar 11, 2011 7:53 AM GMT
    When I talk to my patients about health, I try to focus on 4 major areas: cardiovascular capacity, strength/coordination, flexibility, and nutrition. The goal is to incorporate each of these in some way into your life.

    The area that I find men tend to neglect the most is flexibility, which, surprisingly, is the independent variable of those 4 that has the strongest correlation with health and longevity.

    So, swimming/running? Good.
    Eating? Also good. Lol.

    Would I recommend adding some weight training? Sure. Lifting weights against gravity doesn't just stimulate muscle gain, it also boosts testosterone to help counteract the natural decrease we experience as we age, works the balance and coordination centers of the brain, and possibly also reduces bone loss.

    But, really, make sure you're getting a good amount of stretching in every day. I do 20 minutes. No joke. Your body with thank you in the long run. icon_wink.gif
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    Mar 11, 2011 8:03 AM GMT
    No there's not a thing wrong with it...I think part of it is that people tend to feel threatened by people who excel at things they don't understand or excel at. If someone has a goal/acccomplished a fitness goal that's different than mine, I say "awesome" because that's what makes for interesting conversation. I feel the same way about different cultures, races, and careers and I'm often more apt to look for similarities. That being said some people just don't want to relate to others, they want to look at themselves as being above you because feeling like they're better than you is the only way they can get any confidence. Sooo you've got to pick your battles...

    I think you just have to stay true to yourself, not everyone you meet deserves a place in your life.
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    Mar 11, 2011 8:37 AM GMT
    No... but you're never going to get one of those muscular guys you lust after if you don't lift. icon_surprised.gif
  • coastguy90814

    Posts: 661

    Mar 11, 2011 9:36 AM GMT
    Hey man it's great that you do what you do even though it's only aerobic but what I would add to this is that it's essential to do weight and resistance training, not so much for looks (aesthetics) but for overall health and fitness. Science shows that if you have more lean muscle on your body, your body works more efficiently as burning calories and keeping you at either your ideal weight. Overtime we lose a little bit of our metabolic rate so having lean muscle whether you decide to grow or just have a muscular frame is essential to keep you metabolism going and help you at keeping your ideal body weight. Cardio alone is not enough for the long haul but good luck!
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    Mar 11, 2011 9:57 AM GMT
    Cardio is great!
    However, your endurance needs to be complimented with strength!
    You are healthy no doubt! Keep up with the cardio you're doing but also add some weight training here and there!

    icon_smile.gif Best of luck to you!
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    Mar 11, 2011 12:45 PM GMT
    too much self-doubt, seeking affirmation from others won't help you grow into a complete person.There is always noises surrounding us telling us different opinions about things that we believe in, so it's important to be able to filter the bad ones and take in the good ones and trust your own instinct.
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    Mar 11, 2011 12:54 PM GMT
    A1EX saidNo... but you're never going to get one of those muscular guys you lust after if you don't lift. icon_surprised.gif


    seriously?

    ddt8665 saidI honestly think that there is absolutely nothing wrong about this. Who cares what people think. icon_wink.gif


    This.
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    Mar 11, 2011 1:03 PM GMT
    "A good balance is delightful" ...

    (paraphrasing a Bible verse of all things)


    But yeah. Card and resistance training and power training are all needed to reap a high level of fitness, IMHO.

    For me, Russian Kettlebell workouts combine these three forms of exercises in many routines; ballistic exercises like KB swings and snatches will get your optometric power training in your glutes and quads, while driving your heart rate way up; and heavier weight Turkish get-ups and overhead press squats will offer good resistance.

    I'm nowhere near being an expert in it, but it is fun, and hope I can get strong enough to do a good 30-45 min session with a 2-Pood (32kg/72lbs) KB soon.
  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16311

    Mar 11, 2011 1:15 PM GMT
    Doing more than just cardio is helpful, but in the end, if you are seeking exercise, cardio is way (way) better than doing nothing. Don't ever think it is "looked down upon", but also don't close your mind to doing more than that. Congrats for doing what you are.....

    icon_biggrin.gif
  • massbuildah

    Posts: 276

    Mar 11, 2011 1:21 PM GMT
    It really all depends on two things:
    1. what are your fitness goals?
    2. what do you enjoy doing?

    Do you want to maintain your physique as is or would you like to be able to swim a bit faster, run a bit faster/longer? Are you interested in gaining a bit of lean muscle mass or losing fat?

    Have you tried lifting?Does it appeal to you?

    Decide what your goals are. Learn what you need to do to acheive them.

    If your goal is to continue to run and swim because you love it and are happy with yourself then why change?
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    Mar 11, 2011 1:34 PM GMT
    coastguy90814 saidHey man it's great that you do what you do even though it's only aerobic but what I would add to this is that it's essential to do weight and resistance training, not so much for looks (aesthetics) but for overall health and fitness. Science shows that if you have more lean muscle on your body, your body works more efficiently as burning calories and keeping you at either your ideal weight. Overtime we lose a little bit of our metabolic rate so having lean muscle whether you decide to grow or just have a muscular frame is essential to keep you metabolism going and help you at keeping your ideal body weight. Cardio alone is not enough for the long haul but good luck!


    This here is good stuff. I understand and even have a high Vo2 myself but struggle with strength training. because of my body type, I dont build or gain strength easily. However, to make gains in cardiovascular ability, you need a program that addresses both.

    I take my NASM cert next monday. Wish me luck !
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    Mar 11, 2011 1:55 PM GMT
    People view exercising in different ways... I know a guy who only does strength training and looks down on cardio. I also know other people who only do cardio. It depends on what your goals are or if you are even doing it to reach a certain goal. Some people do it just because of the way it makes them feel. I personally do both. I say, do whatever the hell you want icon_biggrin.gif As long as your taking care of your body.
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    Mar 11, 2011 1:57 PM GMT
    FierceEyes saidWhen I talk to my patients about health, I try to focus on 4 major areas: cardiovascular capacity, strength/coordination, flexibility, and nutrition. The goal is to incorporate each of these in some way into your life.

    The area that I find men tend to neglect the most is flexibility, which, surprisingly, is the independent variable of those 4 that has the strongest correlation with health and longevity.

    So, swimming/running? Good.
    Eating? Also good. Lol.

    Would I recommend adding some weight training? Sure. Lifting weights against gravity doesn't just stimulate muscle gain, it also boosts testosterone to help counteract the natural decrease we experience as we age, works the balance and coordination centers of the brain, and possibly also reduces bone loss.

    But, really, make sure you're getting a good amount of stretching in every day. I do 20 minutes. No joke. Your body with thank you in the long run. icon_wink.gif


    This^^. You need to add strength/flexiblity training too. Cardio, strength training, flexibility, and nutrition go hand in hand. If you are lacking in the strength and flexibility department, it leaves your joints susceptible to injury.
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    Mar 11, 2011 2:57 PM GMT
    As long as you achieve what you want to, and get everything that you want out of these cardio workouts, that's all you have to worry about. Don't take other peoples' expectations as the "must" of the exercise world.
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    Mar 11, 2011 3:27 PM GMT

    Do what you feel!

    The reality is actually doing something that burns calories automatically puts you ahead of millions of others sitting at home doing nothing but stuffing their faces.


    There's an underlying level of wankiness and pretense that comes with this site ( Muscles + Gay guys = envitable).

    THEIR MANTRA - Everyone must be buff and everyone must be big.

    Really?

    The idea of spending every waking moment lifting weighs or counting reps is a dull way to live, in my opinion.

    Give me the hiking trail, a clear day and a packed lunch any day.

    That's my thing and if cardio is yours - Good to hear it!!

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    Mar 11, 2011 4:01 PM GMT
    catfish5 said
    FierceEyes saidWhen I talk to my patients about health, I try to focus on 4 major areas: cardiovascular capacity, strength/coordination, flexibility, and nutrition. The goal is to incorporate each of these in some way into your life.

    The area that I find men tend to neglect the most is flexibility, which, surprisingly, is the independent variable of those 4 that has the strongest correlation with health and longevity.

    So, swimming/running? Good.
    Eating? Also good. Lol.

    Would I recommend adding some weight training? Sure. Lifting weights against gravity doesn't just stimulate muscle gain, it also boosts testosterone to help counteract the natural decrease we experience as we age, works the balance and coordination centers of the brain, and possibly also reduces bone loss.

    But, really, make sure you're getting a good amount of stretching in every day. I do 20 minutes. No joke. Your body with thank you in the long run. icon_wink.gif


    This^^. You need to add strength/flexiblity training too. Cardio, strength training, flexibility, and nutrition go hand in hand. If you are lacking in the strength and flexibility department, it leaves your joints susceptible to injury.


    … which is why I have a job. icon_rolleyes.gif
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    Mar 11, 2011 5:19 PM GMT
    The five main components of physical fitness are usually listed as:
    1. Cardiovascular fitness - The ability of the circulatory system to supply oxygen to working muscle
    2. Muscular Strength - The amount of force that can be produced by a single contraction of a muscle
    3. Muscular Endurance - The ability of a muscle group to continue muscle movement over a length of time
    4. Flexibility - The range of movement possible at various joints
    5. Body Composition - The relative percentage of body fat compared to lean body mass

    Ideally, one would try to strike a balance in all five of these areas. As a runner/swimmer, you'd probably be good at #1 (obviously), #3 (at least in your legs), and #5 (runners and swimmers tend to be quite lean), and maybe #4. If you exercise just for fun/recreation, I'd say to hell what anyone else thinks and just keep doing what you like. However, if you're competing, you might want to consider some crosstraining involving weight lifting and/or bodyweight exercises.

    Realistically, not everyone will strike a perfect balance for all five. Depending on your body type, you just may be naturally better in one area than others. But that doesn't mean you can't benefit by some training in your weak areas.
  • CAtoFL

    Posts: 834

    Mar 11, 2011 5:55 PM GMT
    The heart of a vertebrate is composed of cardiac muscle. If it fails, the other ones aren't worth so much - no matter HOW hot you look in posing trunks.

    Do your cardio.
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    Mar 11, 2011 6:19 PM GMT
    Great question, it's amazing how many guys I see lifting (or trying) that should be concentrating on cardio. I found that when I started working out because I had gained weight, I did pretty much only cardio. Once I lost a lot of weight, then I started branching out to even out my workout routine. That was just a preference of mine, I still always do more cardio than working out. Anyone who looks down at the cardio side (regardless of how you get it) is ignorant of what fitness is truly all about.
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    Mar 11, 2011 6:39 PM GMT
    KnuxNole saidI consider myself to be fairly active, I keep healthy and run/swim, but it seems everyone considers fitness to be about the weight room. I mean, if someone asked if I was in shape, I would say yes because of those two facts above. But, when I mention I only run and swim, I feel people don't think that's good based on expression. I'm the guy, who runs/swims, eats 3 meals, and that's basically it. I don't see that a problem at all, but maybe I'm wrong, idk.


    What you feel comfortable with is solely personal; as long as you're benefiting from the exercises you do, why would you give a hoot about what they think?

    And more importantly, who gave them the right to 'look down upon' anyone else?
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    Mar 11, 2011 6:51 PM GMT
    I'd love to gain more upper body muscle, but I run competitively. Depending on your choice of cardio, I think, unfortunately, that you're kind of limited to that because any kind of weight gain hinders your performance. icon_sad.gif

    I think a lot of lifers look down on runners and cyclists because our reasons for "working out" are different. Lifters usually want to look good, while runners and cyclists are doing it because they truly enjoy it... For me, as a runner, that enjoyment is only felt after I'm finished, though. icon_wink.gif
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    Mar 12, 2011 3:47 AM GMT
    It's your fitness...do whatever it is that YOU want to do icon_cool.gif