Has Therapy Helped You?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 12, 2011 3:12 AM GMT
    I feel very unmotivated and lethargic. My Mom says I should see a therapist, but I don't know if they can really help me. I know the things I have to do in order to get my life back in order (Going back to college is the big one) it's just I feel very unmotivated with life in general.

    I don't want to take medication; I don't have insurance and never liked the idea of becoming dependent on medicine. I've tried St. Johns Wort and 5-HTP it somewhat helped mostly I noticed it aided me in sleeping.

    Also any tips about finding a therapist or if you think certain therapists are better than others would be greatly appreciated. I guess I'm sort of hoping someone will say "Yes I went to therapy and it changed my life" but that's probably wishful thinking.

  • EricLA

    Posts: 3461

    Mar 12, 2011 8:17 AM GMT
    jprichva saidOkay, I'll say it.
    I did go to therapy and it did change my life.
    But not overnight.


    Ditto. I had the same opinion about medicating myself. But it came to the point I felt I wasn't making any progress with talk therapy. I'm glad I got over it, because whereas I'd describe my mood before as more often than not below the midline, since I've started taking something I'm so much more functional and not preoccupied -- paralyzed -- by feeling bad. It's made all the difference.
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    Mar 12, 2011 8:18 AM GMT
    the gym is a drug store . . .
  • fitnesshound

    Posts: 36

    Mar 12, 2011 1:30 PM GMT
    I think of therapy like this: it's a place I can go where I can discuss deeply held issues with someone who is "on my side" and willing to call me on my shit in a gentle, productive way.

    I would suggest therapy for anyone who has issues they need to work out and who doesn't have someone who will just listen to them without judgment and (in some cases) without trying to fix it for them. Trust me, sometimes too much help is as bad as too little.

    Any reputable therapist will probably suggest anti-depressants if they feel it will help you stabilize, but they shouldn't push them on you if you say "no."

    So, I say...take a chance. icon_smile.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 12, 2011 5:18 PM GMT
    if you're not up to pharmaceuticals, try Chinese medicine and acupuncture. you are exhibiting classic signs of depression and should seek a variety of medical/naturalist advice. Many doctors practice both.............Keithicon_wink.gif
  • allatonce

    Posts: 904

    Mar 12, 2011 7:09 PM GMT
    I definitely think therapy is better than medication in many cases. I don't really have a strong belief in brain drugs, but it is great they are there for those who is works for. In my experience I just need to find things that give me passion and do them. Join a couple things, I think sometimes DOING things that are new and different can help so much.
  • Sparkycat

    Posts: 1064

    Mar 12, 2011 7:36 PM GMT
    You may need to interview more than one therapist to find one you connect with. The therapist does not fix you. You have to do that with the therapist's help. I say that because I know people who decided therapy was not working, quit, and could not grasp the idea that the client does the hard work, not the therapist. Therapy is not just one hour per week, but rather is that hour plus all the time you spend on your own working on what you have learned in therapy, journaling, practicing cognitive therapy techniques.etc.

    Just some random thoughts.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 12, 2011 7:56 PM GMT
    Yep
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    Mar 13, 2011 2:47 AM GMT
    Thanks everyone's advice was helpful. I am going to schedule an appointment Monday to see somebody. The advice of checking out a few therapists is a really good idea.
  • xebec75

    Posts: 243

    Mar 14, 2011 10:10 PM GMT
    Check out therapist who practice CBT. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy is the only proven method of psychotherapeutic intervention that has a statistical correlation to improved mental health function. Meaning...its scientifically proven to work if u follow it. It changed my life.
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    Mar 14, 2011 10:37 PM GMT
    Yeah, you should try CBT. Also hearing them repeat to you what you've said to them can be enough to blow you away. Sometimes we don't recognize the impact of our own thoughts.

    Therapist is actually a word that doesn't mean anything. Anyone can call themselves a therapist. Make sure you are seeing a psychologist. A psychiatrist, on the other hand, is only interested in diagnosing and treating a condition with drugs, which some people need, but I doubt it's for you. A psychologist really has the power to break any thought pattern or belief you hold, so a reputable one should disclose their philosophy to you before starting.
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    Mar 15, 2011 4:24 AM GMT
    Thanks xebec75 and kandsk good information. I found someone that uses a cognitive and dialectical behavioral approach.
  • gumbosolo

    Posts: 382

    Mar 15, 2011 4:31 AM GMT
    Therapy is definitely a good idea, but I'd suggest concurrently examining your diet and exercise habits. Without knowing anything about you personally, I'd submit that a very large portion of mood issues have to do with nutrition and activity. Especially since you use the word "lethargic" which is as much a physical as an emotional sensation.

    Best of luck to you.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 15, 2011 4:52 AM GMT
    gumbosolo saidTherapy is definitely a good idea, but I'd suggest concurrently examining your diet and exercise habits. Without knowing anything about you personally, I'd submit that a very large portion of mood issues have to do with nutrition and activity. Especially since you use the word "lethargic" which is as much a physical as an emotional sensation.

    Best of luck to you.


    Thanks I agree. Diet does play a big role in mood and energy, and so does exercise. I used to exercise everyday and now I force myself to do it about 4-5 times a week and I feel really good while doing it, but about 30-60 min after I'm left feeling sad and moody again.

    I know amino acids from protein are important for neurotransmitters. I also know omega 3 fatty acids, B-Vitamins, and Vitamin-D can all play a role in my mood as well. I've been taking all of these through diet and supplements; I’m really trying to get myself out of this mind set. I know the way I'm viewing life isn't rational and is extremely pessimistic. I just want my life back: normal sleeping patterns, energy, and a happy disposition would mean more than gold to me.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 15, 2011 4:55 AM GMT
    Ask UPRYTE.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 15, 2011 11:51 AM GMT
    Were you being serious, Guy? It sounded really bitchy and incredibly unkind. Uprite has schizophrenia and its a long term illness. I really hope you were not being serious.

    Therapy does help but you have to work at it long term- it will get worse before better and takes a while to sort out your issues, depending on the severity.
  • alphatop

    Posts: 1955

    Mar 15, 2011 12:08 PM GMT
    Like it or not, meds can and will help you. Beside that, lots of sunshine and try this motivational sites, such as
    http://habitforge.com/
    and http://www.lifetc.com/
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 15, 2011 12:29 PM GMT
    Trying as many therapist as you can until you find the right one. it's bit like shopping for a right pair of fitted jeans, different to everyone. I always think a good therapist is like a good teacher, but instead of teaching you how to read the textbook, he teaches you how to go deep into yourself and and overcome the "life-traps" which were resulted by our childhood experiences and early life memories.

    Yes, therapy helped me.And I actually enjoyed the experience.
  • massbuildah

    Posts: 276

    Mar 15, 2011 12:57 PM GMT
    I'll admit it, I have one. And thank God I do. I knew I was holding on to a lot of shit but didn't know how to let it out or talk about it, or even how to verbalize it sometimes. Definitely having 'someone on my side' to listen and not judge is so refreshing! And sometimes just being able to say something out loud to someone impartial, helps to let go of things.

    I know I have things I have to work on for my physical health, and now I know I have things to work on for my own mental health as well. So long as I practice both I maintain positive about my life and feel like I can deal with anything.

    As for meds, Any good therapist will mention them, but the better ones will not go that route up front until they can determine if that's reallly necessary.

    I found mine online and reviewed dozens of profiles of thereapists in the area. I kept coming back to one whose profile and picture really made me feel comfortable. I chose him and he's awesome.

    Good luck.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 15, 2011 1:14 PM GMT
    Therapy will only change your life if YOU do the work needed.. Therapists can NOT change your life, only guide YOU in the process!
    Yes it works..
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    Mar 27, 2011 11:27 PM GMT
    Just an update I ended up seeing an RN and she prescribed me a low dose of an antidepressant it has been working great (knock on wood). Although initially I didn’t want to take a pill I started to look at the depression as a disease the same way a diabetic would need insulin.

    I still don’t love the idea of medication simply because I feel our society uses medicine more like a band aid then actually going to the root of problems, but sometimes you need a boost to see the light at the end of the tunnel.

    I do recommend seeing a psychiatrist over an RN the main reason I saw an RN is due to cost. Also look up reviews for psychiatrists in your area some of them had terrible reviews; I would avoid them.
  • RupCadell

    Posts: 17

    Aug 21, 2011 3:47 AM GMT
    Yeah I have a therapist and it's amazing. Lots of hard work, but the payoff is enormous and lasting.

    I highly recommend it!
  • Lincsbear

    Posts: 2605

    Aug 21, 2011 5:50 AM GMT
    I had a course of counselling in 2006 and it did help me,accelerated my recovery mostly,but you have to want to do it yourself.The counsellor was no more than a kindly guide for me.He gave no answers.In fact,he constantly asked them of me!
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    Aug 21, 2011 2:33 PM GMT
    I have been in therapy for over four years. The major driving force for me me finally deciding to see a therapist was my sexuality. My therapist (who happens to be a lesbian) has definitely helped me, but there are still a lot of things that I still need to work on. Like someone said here, therapy doesn't work overnight. It takes a lot of commitment and hard work.

    Check out the website http://www.psychologytoday.com/. That's how I found my own therapist.

    Good luck!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 21, 2011 2:37 PM GMT
    xebec75 saidCheck out therapist who practice CBT. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy is the only proven method of psychotherapeutic intervention that has a statistical correlation to improved mental health function. Meaning...its scientifically proven to work if u follow it. It changed my life.


    That's not entirely true - though yes CBT is very effective for many forms of psychpathology. Other modalities such as psychodynamic are very effective... it all depends on what you are going to therapy for...

    http://www.apa.org/news/press/releases/2010/01/psychodynamic-therapy.aspx