Japan Nuclear Watch Thread (latest: JAPAN ABONDONS NUCLEAR PLANT!)

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 12, 2011 11:17 AM GMT
    uh oh..



    Update 1:



    Update 2:

    confirmed cases of radioactive exposure



    Update 3:

    Another explosion at nuclear plant a possibility




    Nuclear Fallout Map released

    *map removed due to unconfirmed credibility*

    Update 4:

    Multiple Nuclear Meltdowns Possible



    Update 5:



    Update 6:

    All 3 Nuclear fuel rods appear to be melting, 4th reactor is on fire.



    Update 7:

    JAPAN ABONDONS NUCLEAR PLANT!!!

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 12, 2011 11:43 AM GMT
    Fuck...
    "But Walt Patterson, of the London research institute Chatham House, said "this is starting to look a lot like Chernobyl"."
    -http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-pacific-12720219
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    Mar 12, 2011 1:48 PM GMT
    The Japanese Government claims that it is not a meltdown. I hope it's true. icon_eek.gif
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14303

    Mar 12, 2011 4:23 PM GMT
    Lets hope that this is not serious. Anything radioactive is very dangerous. Japan has already been through enough tragedy from the recent violent earthquake and tsunami.
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    Mar 12, 2011 4:31 PM GMT
    It's steam. icon_wink.gif

    "However, experts said Japan should not expect a repeat of Chernobyl. They said pictures of mist above the plant suggested only small amounts of radiation had been expelled as part of measures to ensure its stability, far from the radioactive clouds Chernobyl spewed out 25 years ago."

    http://ca.news.yahoo.com/strong-earthquake-jolts-east-japan-tsunami-warning-20110310-220309-642.html
  • mustangd

    Posts: 434

    Mar 12, 2011 4:51 PM GMT
    there are indications of damage to the fuel rods, from super heating. that would be a scenario more like 3 mile island. worst case, if the fuel rods are still being subjected to super heat, and that can't be stopped, then the rods will lose their integrity, and the the reaction will increase without an ability to control it, this was the danger at 3 mile island. we got 3m.i. under control, hopefully the japanese will as well.
    at any rate, japan gets a significant amount of their electricity generated from nuclear power, and much of that capacity is off line, and much will remain off line for a long time, which means, their country will have trouble meeting electrical needs for some time.
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    Mar 12, 2011 5:08 PM GMT
    As bad as it is, that's an awesome video. The actual explosion is just a fraction of a second at the beginning. Said to be a hydrogen explosion (which is invisible) but you can see the shock wave going straight up. Hard to say what's going on right now though. Just a lot of noise from media sources that don't know anything.
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    Mar 12, 2011 6:27 PM GMT
    i livef in japan for 2 years, and i love the japaneese people, but those ppl got some fucked up views, they can't really even say "no", they would just try suggesting alternatives. the gov't tends to declare thing as facts, even though they arent, i went to hiroshima while i was there, it was kina messed up, it was portrayed as an "unfortunate event", but why it actually happened was mostly hidden, i would say there is a very serious chance that there are real problems in that plant, and a meltdown is very possible, theres just no way to know, here's to wising em the best.
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    Mar 12, 2011 6:27 PM GMT
    Why are we still mostly using petroleum, coal and nuclear sources for our energy needs?

    Solar 3,850,000 EJ[6]
    Wind 2,250 EJ[7]
    Biomass 3,000 EJ[8]
    Primary energy use (2005) 487 EJ[9]
    Electricity (2005) 56.7 EJ[10]
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    Mar 12, 2011 7:18 PM GMT
    Johnnyhotsauce saidi livef in japan for 2 years, and i love the japaneese people, but those ppl got some fucked up views, they can't really even say "no", they would just try suggesting alternatives. the gov't tends to declare thing as facts, even though they arent, i went to hiroshima while i was there, it was kina messed up, it was portrayed as an "unfortunate event", but why it actually happened was mostly hidden, i would say there is a very serious chance that there are real problems in that plant, and a meltdown is very possible, theres just no way to know, here's to wising em the best.


    Every country in the world turns history on their favor, specially the US. This however has nothing to do with the current incident in Fukishima dai-ichi plant, the government initially evacuated those within a 10 kilometers radius and right now all of those within 20 kilometers distance from this facility have been evacuated. The Japanese government claims that they have the situation under control trying to keep the calm of their citizens while they work on the issue and take the right steps to prevent their citizens from being exposed to radiation over a nuclear meltdown.
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    Mar 12, 2011 7:20 PM GMT
    q1w2e3 saidWhy are we still mostly using petroleum, coal and nuclear sources for our energy needs?

    Solar 3,850,000 EJ[6]
    Wind 2,250 EJ[7]
    Biomass 3,000 EJ[8]
    Primary energy use (2005) 487 EJ[9]
    Electricity (2005) 56.7 EJ[10]


    Lack of space
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 12, 2011 7:56 PM GMT
    http://www.americanenergyindependence.com/solarenergy.aspxIf the sunshine radiating on the surface of an area 100 miles wide by 100 miles long would provide all of the electricity that America needs, every day, why would Americans hesitate to use it? There are millions of open acres in the deserts of America, where the sun's energy does nothing more than heat rocks and sand.


    solar_cost_curve.gif
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    Mar 13, 2011 1:25 AM GMT
    Update!

  • metta

    Posts: 39089

    Mar 13, 2011 3:45 AM GMT
    For battered Japan, a new threat: nuclear meltdown

    "A partial meltdown was likely under way at a second nuclear reactor, a top Japanese official said Sunday, as authorities frantically tried to prevent a similar threat from nearby unit following a catastrophic earthquake and tsunami."


    http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20110313/ap_on_bi_ge/as_japan_earthquake


    Seeing what an earth quake can do to a nuclear plant with 5 backup supplies that all failed after the earthquake, it makes me wonder If a nuclear plant was ever attached by another country or terrorist, how dangerous could that be?
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    Mar 13, 2011 5:22 AM GMT
    .....wow. .....and this unfortunate event couldn't wait after I visited Japan? ....../:
  • XxXxXxAZNxXxX...

    Posts: 615

    Mar 13, 2011 5:25 AM GMT
    I feel so bad
    but this is why I feel like nuclear anything should be prohibited...too dangerous for people
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    Mar 13, 2011 5:27 AM GMT
    its like watching "2012" without the sound effects. This is horrible.
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    Mar 13, 2011 5:28 AM GMT
    If you live in california i suggest you get yourself some potassium iodide.
  • t0theheights

    Posts: 428

    Mar 13, 2011 5:34 AM GMT
    alonelyplanet saidIf you live in california i suggest you get yourself some potassium iodide.


    You all need educating on nuclear power... another Chernobyl or 3 Mile Island has a .00001% chance of happening -- even in battered Japan. Those tragedies happened before CONTAINMENT facilities were built to prevent crises. Even if there is a "meltdown" in Japan, the containment technology will prevent radiation from leaking out. Nuclear power remains the cleanest and most efficient source of energy for the future and we need much more of it to get us off oil. (France runs 70% on nuclear.) Nuclear power is safe, clean, and efficient.

    The nuclear concerns in Japan are warranted; a meltdown would be extremely costly, but it's not going to irradiate the nation.
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    Mar 13, 2011 7:32 AM GMT
    Update 2!

    confirmed cases of radioactive exposure

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    Mar 13, 2011 7:36 AM GMT
    That's just horrible what is happening over there. I sure hope the U.S. steps up and helps out one of our most valuable allies and friends.
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    Mar 13, 2011 7:17 PM GMT
    Update 3:

    Another explosion at nuclear plant a possibility




    Nuclear Fallout Map released

    *map removed due to unconfirmed credibility*
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    Mar 13, 2011 7:26 PM GMT
    Let's hope this scenario doesn't come to pass and if Japanese are truthful and decide to reveal that in fact, there is a meltdown...then they need to tell the world. As mentioned, potassium iodide would be good option to have...just in case:

    http://www.jcrowsmarketplace.com/1lugolssolution5folkmedicinebydrjarvisincludessandh.aspx

    Interesting article on Miso Soup..check it out:

    http://www.mitoku.com/products/miso/atomic_metals.html
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    Mar 13, 2011 7:30 PM GMT
    The English reporting on this has been horrible and absurdly sensationalist according to friends of mine currently in Japan.

    For one engineer's (he's a systems engineer) summary based on news reporting there:

    http://www.kalzumeus.com/2011/03/13/some-perspective-on-the-japan-earthquake/

    There is currently a lot of panicked reporting about the problems with two of Tokyo Electric’s nuclear power generation plants in Fukushima. Although few people would admit this out loud, I think it would be fair to include these in the count of systems which functioned exactly as designed. For more detail on this from someone who knows nuclear power generation, which rules out him being a reporter, see here.

    • The instant response — scramming the reactors — happened exactly as planned and, instantly, removed the Apocalyptic Nightmare Scenarios from the table.

    • There were some failures of important systems, mostly related to cooling the reactor cores to prevent a meltdown. To be clear, a meltdown is not an Apocalyptic Nightmare Scenario: the entire plant is designed such that when everything else fails, the worst thing that happens is somebody gets a cleanup bill with a whole lot of zeroes in it.

    • Failure of the systems is contemplated in their design, which is why there are so many redundant ones. You won’t even hear about most of the failures up and down the country because a) they weren’t nuclear related (a keyword which scares the heck out of some people) and b) redundant systems caught them.

    • The tremendous public unease over nuclear power shouldn’t be allowed to overpower the conclusion: nuclear energy, in all the years leading to the crisis and continuing during it, is absurdly safe. Remember the talk about the trains and how they did exactly what they were supposed to do within seconds? Several hundred people still drowned on the trains. That is a tragedy, but every person connected with the design and operation of the railways should be justifiably proud that that was the worst thing that happened. At present, in terms of radiation risk, the tsunami appears to be a wash: on the one hand there’s a near nuclear meltdown, on the other hand the tsunami disrupted something really dangerous: international flights. (One does not ordinarily associate flying commercial airlines with elevated radiation risks. Then again, one doesn’t normally associate eating bananas with it, either. When you hear news reports of people exposed to radiation, keep in mind, at the moment we’re talking a level of severity somewhere between “ate a banana” and “carries a Delta Skymiles platinum membership card”.)


    For a more detailed look at a research scientist from MIT's view of why he's NOT worried about Japan's nuclear reactors:
    http://morgsatlarge.wordpress.com/2011/03/13/why-i-am-not-worried-about-japans-nuclear-reactors/
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    Mar 13, 2011 7:38 PM GMT
    I'm removing the maps because I cannot confirm it's authenticity