Meditation tomorrow - what would you do?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 14, 2011 7:02 PM GMT
    I'm leading a meditation tomorrow night with a group of Zen-interested british people. My mind is so full of the tragedy in Japan that I can't think of much else. I just thought I'd ask, what would you bring if you were leading a meditation at this time?

    Woody
  • The6Degrees

    Posts: 53

    Mar 18, 2011 10:44 AM GMT
    Hi Woody,

    Sorry for the late response. I'm assuming you'll be leading more...
    While Zen (in general) has no use for visual stimuli, it may help to take a note from Mahayana practitioners and use a yantra;

    http://www.google.com/images?hl=en&sugexp=ldymls&xhr=t&q=buddhist+meditation+deity&cp=25&newwindow=1&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.&um=1&ie=UTF-8&source=og&sa=N&tab=wi&biw=929&bih=536

    The visual stimulation should help to focus your groups mind on just one thing...rather than 10,000 things.

    icon_smile.gif

    M
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    Mar 19, 2011 12:06 AM GMT
    Thanks M! I'll keep that in mind for next time.

    I do like exploring alternatives to just text or sound, i did one once where everyone had to select objects to hold, stones or glass, which was kinda nice.

    W
  • barriehomeboy

    Posts: 2475

    Mar 19, 2011 12:17 AM GMT
    Isn't Zen a Japanese thing, and wasn't meditation invented by the Japanese? Maybe they should be leading you?
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    Mar 19, 2011 12:46 AM GMT
    barriehomeboy saidIsn't Zen a Japanese thing, and wasn't meditation invented by the Japanese? Maybe they should be leading you?


    meditation was not "invented"; it's not a 'system' that's developed like a formula or a recipe and thought in a Dale Carnegie course for $150 plus tax.icon_biggrin.gif

    Meditation originated, as most spiritual ( dont read religious) practices did, in the world's spiritual cradle of India. Zen is a Japanese version of Buddhism (Mahāyāna Buddhism). and its word (Zen) has its root in the Indian Sanskrit language where it's called dhyana, Dhyana in turn offers approaches of how to emerse yourself deep within yourself - away from the 5 senses - to find and ultimately realize your higher (real) self.

    I might want to add the there are various forms of yoga, out of which it would be fair to say that, while practiced by millions of people, Zen is nevertheless part of a smaller group of yoga practitioners and has its roots and origin in the Indian yogic tradition out of which most of Asia's spiritual teaching take their source.

    The Hata Yoga practice which in America, not in Europe, is generally know as 'practicing yoga' is but 1 of the pillars of the overall yoga, to strengthen the body so it can carry out the mission, which is to support and strengthen the physical existence of the being so it can better execute for what it came to earth to accomplish.

    In it's ultimate meaning, yoga means nothing less then 'union with the Divine. Most can only pursue1 aspect of yoga in 1 lifetime, yet there are systems to combine then .

  • barriehomeboy

    Posts: 2475

    Mar 19, 2011 12:50 AM GMT
    Wow. You`re so knowledgeable and hot. Do you own or rent, and are you looking for an older husband from Canada!
  • barriehomeboy

    Posts: 2475

    Mar 19, 2011 12:51 AM GMT
    Actually I think you made that all up, but you`re too hot to forgive for lying.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 19, 2011 12:58 AM GMT
    woodyman saidI'm leading a meditation tomorrow night with a group of Zen-interested british people. My mind is so full of the tragedy in Japan that I can't think of much else. I just thought I'd ask, what would you bring if you were leading a meditation at this time?

    Woody



    Do you mean bringing a mental attitude and not physical stuff? In that case I'd probably reflect on the thousands of bloody wars and disaster and suffering that modern humans have endured since they emerged 200,000 years ago.
    It doesn't diminish the magnitude of suffering in Japan, but it does put it into perspective: Suffering and periods of despair are inextricable from the human experience, and they happen every minute.